The philosophical works of David Hume, Volumen3

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II
3
III
8
IV
14
V
31
VI
37
VII
42
VIII
50
IX
57
XXII
224
XXIII
245
XXIV
256
XXV
283
XXVI
285
XXVII
302
XXVIII
317
XXIX
333

X
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XI
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XII
90
XIII
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XIV
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XV
124
XVI
156
XVII
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XVIII
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XIX
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XX
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XXI
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XXXI
348
XXXII
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XXXIII
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XXXIV
384
XXXV
391
XXXVI
411
XXXVII
421
XXXVIII
509
XL
533
XLI
538
XLIII
548
XLIV
561

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Página 236 - There never was a civilised nation of any other complexion than white, nor even any individual eminent either in action or speculation. No ingenious manufactures amongst them, no arts, no sciences.
Página 322 - Accordingly we find, that, in every kingdom, into which money begins to flow in greater abundance than formerly, every tiling takes a new face : labour and industry gain life ; the merchant becomes more enterprising, the manufacturer more diligent and skilful, and even the farmer follows his plough with greater alacrity and attention.
Página 152 - Honour's a sacred tie, the law of kings, The noble mind's distinguishing perfection, That aids and strengthens virtue where it meets her, And imitates her actions where she is not.
Página 266 - Though it be certain, that beauty and deformity, more than sweet and bitter, are not qualities in objects, but belong entirely to the sentiment, internal or external ; it must be allowed, that there are certain qualities in objects, which -are fitted by nature to produce those particular feelings.
Página 105 - But though all kinds of government be improved in modern times, yet monarchical government seems to have made the greatest advances towards perfection. It may now be affirmed of civilized monarchies, what was formerly said in praise of republics alone, that they are a government of Lav: s, not of Men.
Página 138 - To balance a large state or society (says he), whether monarchical or republican, on general laws, is a work of so great difficulty that no human genius, however comprehensive, is able, by the mere dint of reason and reflection, to effect it. The judgments of many must unite in the work; experience must guide their labor; time must bring it to perfection, and the feeling of inconveniences must correct the mistakes which they inevitably fall into in their first trials and experiments.
Página 56 - And, as such a violent government cannot long subsist, we shall at last, after many convulsions and civil wars, find repose in absolute monarchy, which it would have been happier for us to have established peaceably from the beginning. Absolute monarchy, therefore, is the easiest death, the true Euthanasia, of the British constitution.
Página 286 - When a man deliberates concerning his conduct in any particular affair, and forms schemes in politics, trade, economy, or any business in life, he never ought to draw his arguments too fine, or connect too long a chain of consequences together. Something is sure to happen, that will disconcert his reasoning, and produce an event different from what he expected. But when we reason upon general subjects...
Página 308 - Laws, order, police, discipline, — these can never be carried to any degree of perfection before human reason has refined itself by exercise, and by an application to the more vulgar arts, at least, of commerce and manufacture. Can we expect that a government will be well modelled by a people who know not how to make a spinning-wheel, or to employ a loom to advantage...
Página 18 - It may easily be observed, that, though free governments have been commonly the most happy for those who partake of their freedom ; yet are they the most ruinous and oppressive to their provinces : And this observation may, I believe, be fixed as a maxim of the kind we are here speaking of.

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