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VENEZUELA. in Washington, D. C., September 3, 1889, and adjourned September 2, 1890, awarding claims against Venezuela amouuting to $980,572.60. (See U. S. Treaties in Force, 1899, p. 653.) For an account of the arbitration under these four conventions, see Moore's History of International Arbitration, Vol. II, p. 1059.

IX. CLAIMS CONVENTION. Concluded January 19, 1892; proclaimed July 30, 1894. 28 Stat. at L.,

p. 1183, in Spanish and English.

By this convention the claim of the Venezuelan Steam Transportation Company against Venezuela was referred to the arbitration of two commissioners and an umpire, who rendered an award of $141,800. (See U. S. Treaties in Force, 1899, p. 65.5.) For an account of the proceedings of this commission, see Moure's History of Internativnal Arbitration, Vol. II, p. 1693.

Proclamations. The following proclamations concern the relations of the United States with Venezuela:

1. By President Benjamin Harrison, under the Act of Congress of October 1, 1890 (26 Stat. at L., p. 567, 612) announcing the action of Venezuela in admitting certain articles free of duty, and thus obtaining the reciprocity advantages under sec. 3 of said act; March 15, 1892. IX Richardson's Messages, p. 268.

2. By President Cleveland, under the Act of Congress of March 2, 1895 (28 Stat at L., p. 727, 733), suspending the prohibition of the importation of cattle from Venezuela and of hides from all parts of the world; November 8, 1885. IX Richardson's Messages, p. 593.

WÜRTTEMBERG.

(See German Empire and Prussia.)

Treaties and Conventions.

I. CONVENTION ABOLISHING DROIT D'AUBAINE AND TAXES ON EMIGRA

TION. Concluded April 10, 1844; proclaimed December 16, 1844. 8 Stat. at

L., p. 588; in German and English. U. S. Tr. and Con. 1889, p. 1144. U. S. Treaties in Force, 1899, p. 656.

The seven articles are:
I. Taxes abolished.

V. Civil suits.
II. Disposal of real property. VI. Extent of convention.
III. Disposal of personal property. VII. Ratification.
IV. Property of absent heirs.

WÜRTTEMBERG.

II. DECLARATION OF ACCESSION. Signed October 13, 1853; proclaimed December 27, 1853. 10 Stat. at L.,

Treaties p. 103. U. S. Tr. and Con. 1889, p. 1146.

Württemberg acceded to the extradition treaty of 1852 with Prussia and the States of the Germanic Confederation.

III. CONVENTION AS TO NATURALIZATION AND EXTRADITION. Concluded July 27, 1868; proclaimed March 7, 1870. 16 Stat. at L.,

p. 735; in German and English. U. S. Tr. and Con. 1889, p. 1146. U. S. Treaties in Force, 1899, p. 658.

The six articles are: 1. Naturalization recognized. IV. Renunciation of naturalizaII. Liability for prior offenses.

tion. III. Extradition treaty renewed. V. Duration.

VI. Ratification. See also protocol explanatory of terms used in the treaty (printed at foot of treaty in both treaty voluines.)

ZANZIBAR.
(See Muscat. )

Treaty.

TREATY AS TO DUTIES ON LIQUORS AND CONSULAR POWERS. Concluded July 3, 1886; proclaimed August 17, 1888. 25 Stat. at L.,

U. S. Tr. and Con. 1889, p. 1209. U. S. Treaties in Force, 1889, p. 661.

p. 1438.

I. Duty on liquors. II. Consular powers.

The three articles are:

111.
III. Ratification.

INTERNATIONAL CONVENTIONS AND ACTS TO

WHICH THE UNITED STATES IS A PARTY.

I. AMELIORATION OF THE CONDITION OF THE WOUNDED IN TIME OF

WAR. Concluded at Geneva, Switzerland, August 22, 1864; ratifications ex

changed by original signatories June 22, 1865; adhesion accepted by the Swiss Confederation June 9, 1882; proclaimed July 26, 1882. 22 Stat. at L., p. 940; in French and English. U. S. Tr. and Con. 1889, p. 1150. U. S. Treaties in Force, 1899, p. 665.

(The President's ratification of the act of accession, as transmitted to Berne and exchanged for the ratifications of the other signatory and adhesory powers, embraces the French text of the convention of August 22, 1864, and the additional articles of October 20, 1868. The French text is, therefore, for all international purposes, the standard one.

The adhesion of the following States has been communicated: Sweden, December 13, 1864; Greece, January 5-17, 1865; Great Britain, February 18, 1865; Mecklenburg-Schwerin, March 9, 1863; Turkey, July 5, 1865; Württemberg, June 2, 1866; Hesse, June 22, 1866; Bavaria, June 30, 1866; Austria, July 21, 1866; Russia, May 10–22, 1867; Persia, December 5, 1874; Roumania, November 18-30, 1874; Salvador, December 30, 1874; Montenegro, November 17-29, 1875; Servia, March 24, 1879; Bolivia, October 16, 1879; Chili, November 15, 1879; Argentine Republic, November 25, 1879; Peru, April 22, 1880. As given in U. S. Treaties in Force, 1899, p. 665.)

The ten articles are: I. Neutrality of ambulances VI. Care of sick and wounded; and hospitals.

evacuations. II. Neutrality of hospital em- VII. Flag and arm-badge. ployees.

VIII. Regulation of details of exeIII. Extent of neutrality.

cution, IV. Equipment.

IX. Accession of other countries. V. Neutrality of persons caring X. Ratification.

for the wounded. In the proclamation of the foregoing convention and following it in each of the treaty volumes are fifteen additional articles which have never been ratified by the signatory parties.

II. INTERNATIONAL BUREAU OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. Concluded May 20, 1875; proclaimed September 27, 1878. 20 Stat. at L.,

p. 709; in French and English. U. S. Tr. and Con. 1889, p. 1157. U. S. Treaties in Force, 1899, p. 673.

(The treaty submitted to the Senate and attached to the proclamation is in the French language. The text printed in the treaty volumes is from a translation made iu the Department of State. Following the treaty are twenty-two regulations and six transient provisions.)

The fourteen articles are: I. International Bureau of | VIII. Prototypes of meter and kilWeights and Measures es

ogram. tablished.

IX. Expenses. II. Special building.

X. Contributions. III. International committee. XI. Contributions from acceding IV. General conferences.

countries. V. Regulations.

XII. Future modifications. VI. Duties of the bureau.

XIII. Duration. VII. Bureau officials.

XIV. Ratification.

III. CONVENTION FOR INTERNATIONAL PROTECTION OF INDUSTRIAL

PROPERTY. Concluded March 20, 1883; accession announced to Swiss Confederation

May 30,1887; proclaimed June 11, 1887. 25 Stat. at L., p. 1372; in French and English. U. S. Tr. and Con. 1889, p. 1168. U. S. Treaties in Force, 1899, p. 684.

(The text in both treaty volumes is reprinted from the proclamation of the President, the original Convention being in the French language.)

The nineteen articles are: I. Union for protection of X. Articles with false place industrial property

of origin. formed.

XI. Temporary protection to II. Mutual protection of pat

articles at expositions. ents, trade-marks, and XII. Central depot of informacommercial names.

tion. III. Protection of alien resi. XIII. International bureau estabdents.

lished. IV. Protection to applicants. XIV. International conferences. V. Introduction by patentee XV. Special diplomatic CODof articles patented in

ventions, other countries.

XVI. Adhesion of other States. VI. Deposit of trade-marks. XVII. Laws to be enacted. VII. Articles protected.

XVIII. Duration. VIII. Commercial names pro- XIX. Ratification. tected.

Protocol. IX. Seizure

unlawfully marked goods.

of

IV. SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION. Concluded April 15, 1891; proclaimed June 22, 1892. 27 Stat. at L.,

p. 958; in French and English. U. S. Treaties in Force, 1899, p. 691.

The two articles are:
International | II. Ratification; duration.

of

I. Exponses

Bureau.

V. CONVENTION FOR PROTECTION OF SUBMARINE CABLES. Concluded March 14, 1884 ; proclaimed May 22, 1885. 24 Stat. at L.,

p. 989; in French with English translation. U. S. Tr. and Con. 1889, p. 1176. U. S. Treaties in Force, 1899, p. 693.

(The text in both treaty volumes is from the proclamation of the President attached to the original in the French language, submitted to the Senate.)

The seventeen articles are:
I. Application of convention. X. Evidence of violations.
II. Punishment for injuries to XI. Trials.
cables.

XII. Laws to be enacted. III. Requirements for cable lay- XIII. Communication of legislaing.

tion. IV. Payment for repairs.

XIV. Adhesion of other States. V. Rules for ships laying XV. Belligerent action not af. cables.

fected. VI. Vessels to avoid cables. XVI. Operation; duration. VII. Losses from cables.

XVII. Ratification. VIII. Jurisdiction of courts. Additional article. British coloIX. Prosecutions for infrac- nies.

tions.

VI. DECLARATION RESPECTING THE INTERPRETATION OF ARTICLES II

AND IV OF THE CONVENTION OF MARCH 14, 1884, FOR THE PROTEC

TION OF SUBMARINE CABLES. Signed December 1, 1886; proclaimed May 1, 1888. 25 Stat. at L.,

p. 1424; in French and English. U. S. Tr. and Con. 1889, p. 1184. U. S. Treaties in Force, 1899, p. 700.

This declaration was submitted and finally adopted by a protocol found at p. 1183 of U. S. Tr. and Con. 1889.

VII. FINAL PROTOCOL OF AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES

AND OTHER POWERS FIXING MAY 1, 1888, AS THE DATE EFFECT OF THE CONVENTION OF 1884, FOR THE PROTECTION OF SUBMARINE

CABLES. Signed July 7, 1887; proclaimed May 1, 1888. 25 Stat. at L., p. 1425;

in French and English. U. S. Tr. and Con. 1889, p. 1184. U. S. Treaties in Force, 1899, p. 701.

VIII. CONVENTION FOR INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE OF OFFICIAL Docu

MENTS, SCIENTIFIC AND LITERARY PUBLICATIONS. Concluded March 15, 1886 ; proclaimed January 15, 1889. 25 Stat. at L.,

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