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(The text in both treaty volumes is reprinted from the translation made in the Department of State and proclaimed by the President with the original treaty, which is in the French language.)

The ten articles are:
I. Bureaus of exchanges to be VI. Expense of transmittal.
established.

VII. Publications of learned asII. Publications to be

ex

sociations. changed.

VIII. Application of convention. III. Lists to be printed.

IX. Adhesion of other States. IV. Number of copies.

X. Ratification; duration. V. Transmission of docu

ments.

IX. CONVENTION FOR THE IMMEDIATE EXCHANGE OF OFFICIAL JOUR

NALS, PARLIAMENTARY ANNALS, AND DOCUMENTS. Concluded March 15, 1886; proclaimed January 15, 1899. 25 Stat. at L.

p. 1469; in French and English. U. S. Treaties, in Force, 1899, p. 704.

The three articles are:
I. Immediate exchange of official II. Adhesion of other states.

journals, parliamentary an. III. Ratification; duration.
nals, documents.

X. GENERAL ACT FOR THE REPRESSION OF AFRICAN SLAVE TRADE. Signed July 2, 1890; ratification deposited with Belgian Government

February 2, 1892; proclaimed April 2, 1892. 27 Stat. at L., p. 886; in French and English. U. S. Treaties in Force, 1899, p. 706.

(The original of this treaty is in the French language and the text given in the treaty volumes is from the translation submitted to the Senate and attached to the proclamation.)

The one hundred articles are: CHAPTER. I. -Slave-trade countries.-Measures to be taken in the places

of origin. I. Moasures to counteract IX. Regulations for use of fireslave trade.

arms. II. Duties of stations, cruisers, X. Transit of arms and ammuand posts.

pition. III. Support of powers.

XI. Information to be furIV. National associations.

nished. V. Legislation to be enacted. XII. Legislation to punish ofVI. Return of liberated slaves.

fenders. VII. Protection fugitive XIII. Prevention of introduction slaves.

of firearms. VIII. Importation of firearms XIV. Duration of firearms proviprohibited.

sions.

of

CHAPTER II.-Caravan routes and transportation of slaves by land.

XV. Stoppage of convoys. XVII, Prevention of sales, etc.
XVI. Posts

caravan XVIII. Care of liberated slaves. routes.

XIX. Punishments.

on

CHAPTER III.- Repression of slave trade by sea.

Section 1.-—General provisions.
XX. Agreement of powers. XXVI. Exchange of informa.
XXI. Maritime zone.

tion. XXII. Right of search, etc. XXVII. International Bureau at XXIII. Vessels liable to search,

Zanzibar. etc.

XXVIII. Slaves escaping to ships XXIV. Effect of present con

of war. ventions.

XXIX. Release of slaves on naXXV. Unlawful use of flag.

tive vessels.

Section II.-Regulations concerning the use of the flags and supervision

by cruisers. 1. Rules for granting the flag to native vessels, and as to crew lists and

manifests of black passengers on board. XXX. Control over native ves- XXXVI. Carriage of negro passels.

sengers. XXXI. Definition of native XXXVII. Entry of vessels. vessels.

XXXVIII. Negro passengers not XXXII. Native vessels which

allowed on native may carry flag.

vessels. XXXIII. Renewal of authority. XXXIX. Vessels excepted. XXXIV. Act of authority.

XL. Forfeiture of license. XXXV. Crew lists.

XLI. Forms to be issued.

2.The stopping of suspected vessels. XLII. Examination of papers. XLVII. Report of detentions. XLIII. Boarding.

XLVIII. Communication to InXLIV. Papers to be examined.

ternational Bureau. XLV. Examination of cargo. XLIX. Disposal of seized vesXLVI. Minute of boarding offi

sels.

cer.

3.-Of the examination and trial of vessels seized. L. Trials.

LV. Choice of arbitrators. LI. Disposal of arrested LVI. Trials. vessels.

LVII. Summary proceedings. LII. Result of condemna- LVIII. Release of innocent vestion.

sels; damages.
LIII. Indemnity for illegal LIX. Penalties.
arrests.

LX. Special tribunals.
LIV. Arbitration of disputed LXI. Communication of in-

CHAPTER IV. Countries to which slaves are sent, whose institutions rec

ognize the existence of domestic slavery. LXII. Prohibition of slave LXVIII. Turkish law. trade.

LXIX. Assistance by Shah of LXIII. Disposition of liberated

Persia. slaves.

LXX. Assistance by Sultan of LXIV. Freedom of fugitive

Zanzibar. slaves.

LXXI. Assistance of diplomaLXV. Sales declared void.

tic and consular offi. LXVI. Examination of native vessels.

LXXII. Liberation office. LXVII. Penal punishments. LXXIII. Exchange of statistics.

cers.

CHAPTER V. Institutions intended to insure the execution of the general

act.
Section 1.of the international maritime office.
LXXIV. International office at LXXVII. Objects.
Zanzibar.

LXXVIII. Archives; translations. LXXV. Organization.

LXIX. Branch offices. LXXVI. Expenses.

LXXX. Annual reports.

Section 11.Of the exchange between the Governments of documents and

information relative to the slave trade. LXXXI. Exchange of informa- LXXXIII. Reports from Zanzibar tion.

office. LXXXII, Central exchange office. LXXXIV. Publications.

LXXXV. Expenses.

women

Section III. Of the protection of liberated slaves. LXXXVI. Offices for liberating | LXXXVIII. Refuge for slaves.

and children. LXXXVII. Registry of releases. LXXXIX. Protection of freed

slaves.

CHAPTER VI. Measures to restrict the traffic in spirituous liquors. XC. Prohibited zone.

XCIII. Excise duty. XCI. Prohibition of importation XCIV. Prevention of introduction and manufacture.

of liquors. XCII. Import duty in certain lo- XCV. Information to be commucalities.

nicated.

CHAPTER VII. Final provisions. XCVI. Contrary stipulations re- XCIX. Ratification. pealed.

C. Duration, XCVII. Modifications.

Protocol. XCVIII. Adhesion of Powers.

XI. CONVENTION CONCERNING THE FORMATION OF AN INTERNATIONAL

UNION FOR THE PUBLICATION OF CUSToms TARIFFS. Signed July 5, 1890; proclaimed December 17, 1890. 26 Stat. at L.,

p. 1518; in French and English. U. S. Treaties in Force, 1899, p. 733.

The fifteen articles are:
I. International Union formed. XI. Assignment of quotas.
II. Object.

XII. Official publications to bo III. International Bureau.

furnished Bureau. IV. Bulletin to be published. XIII. Regulations to be estab V. Personnel of Bureau.

lished. VI. Language to be used.

XIV. Accession of other Statos. VII. Annual reports.

XV. Duration, additions.
VIII. Expenditures.

Regulations.
IX. Quotas of contracting States. Final declarations.
X. Reduction to certain coun-

tries.

XII. CONVENTION REGULATING THE IMPORTATION OF LIQUOR INTO

AFRICA,

Signed June 8, 1899; adhesion of the United States declared Febru

ary 1, 1901; proclaimed February 6, 1901. 31 Stat. at L., p. 1915; in French with a translation in English.

This convention was concluded by Germany, Belgium, Spain, Congo State, France, Great Britain, Italy, Netherlands, Portugal, Russia, Sweden and Norway, and Turkey; all but Turkey ratified it; and Denmark, Persia, Austria and Liberia had acceded to it.

The five articles are:

I. Import duties on liquors.
II. Excise duties.
III. Reservation.

IV. Ratifications.
V. Effect.

XIII. DECLARATION PROHIBITING LAUNCHING PROJECTILES FROM BAL

LOONS Signed at The Hague July 29, 1899; proclaimed November 1, 1901. Pub

lished in leaflet by the State Department in the original French with an English translation.

This declaration was signed by the United States, Germany, Austria, Belgium, China, Denmark, Spain, Mexico, France, Greece, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Montenegro, The Netherlands, Persia, Portugal, Roumania, Russia, Servia, Siam, Sweden and Norway, Switzerland, Turkey, and Bulgaria, to forbid launching projectiles from balloons for a period of

XIV. CONVENTION REGULATING MARITIME WARFARE.
Signed at The Hague July 29, 1899; proclaimed November 1, 1901. Pub-

lished in leaflet by the State Department in the original French with
an English translation.

This convention was signed by the United States, Germany, Austria, Belgium, China, Denmark, Spain, Mexico, France, Great Britain, Greece, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Montenegro, The Netherlands, Persia, Portngal, Roumania, Russia, Servia, Siam, Sweden and Norway, Switzerland, Turkey, and Bulgaria.

The fourteen articles are: I. Military hospital ships ex- VII. Protection of religious and empt from capture.

hospital staff. II. Also private hospital ships. VIII. Protection of captured sick. III. Also hospital ships of neu- IX. Disposal of

captured trals.

wounded. IV. Control of hospital ships by X. Excluded. belligerents.

XI. Rules when binding.
V. Marks and flag of hospital XII. Ratifications.
ships.

XIII. Accession of other powers. VI. Other neutral vessels.

XIV. Convention how denounced.

XV. CONVENTION FOR SETTLING INTERNATIONAL DISPUTES. Signed at The Hague July 29, 1899; proclaimed November 1, 1901.

Published in leaflet by the State Department in the original French with an English translation.

This convention was signed by the United States, Germany, Austria, Belgium, China, Denmark, Spain, Mexico, France, Great Britain, Greece, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Montenegro, The Netherlands, Persia, Portugal, Roumania, Russia, Servia, Siam, Sweden and Norway, Switzerland, Turkey, and Bulgaria.

The sixty-one articles are:
TITLE I. On the maintenance of the general peace.

I. Object of the convention.

TITLE II. On good offices and mediation. II. Mediation

of friendly VI. Mediation advisory, not bindpowers.

ing. III. Right to offer mediation. VII. Mediation not to affect warIV. Duty of mediator.

like preparation or hostiliV. Termination of mediation.

ties.
VIII. Form of special mediation.

TITLE III. On international commissions of inquiry. IX. Commissions to investigate

X. Form of convention, funcquestions of fact.

tions of commissions. 34

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