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SPAIN. (23 Stat. at L., p. 53), suspending the tonnage duty on vessels arriving from San Juan and Mayaguez in Porto Rico; January 31, 1885. VIII Richardson's Messages, p. 284.

6. By President Cleveland, under sec. 4228 of the Revised Statutes, revoking the proclamation of February 14, 1884; October 13, 1886. VIII Richardson's Messages, p. 489.

7. By President Cleveland, under sec. 4228 of the Revised Statutes, suspending discriminating duties of tonnage and impost on Spanish vessels and their merchandise imported from Cuba and Porto Rico or any foreign country; October 27, 1886. VIII Richardson's Messages, p. 490.

8. By President Cleveland, under sec. 4228 of the Revised Statutes, suspending discriminating duties of tonnage and impost on Spanish vessels and merchandise imported in them from any country; September 21, 1887. VIII Richardson's Messages, p. 570.

9. By President Benjamin Harrison, under the Act of Congress of October 1, 1890 (26 Stat. at L., p. 567, 612), announcing the action of Spain in admitting certain articles free of duty into Cuba and Porto Rico and thus obtaining the reciprocity advantages under sec. 3 of said act; July 31, 1891. IX Richardson's Messages, p. 148.

10. By President Cleveland, under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1891 (26 Stat. at L., p. 1106), granting the benefit of the copyright laws to the subjects of Spain; July 10, 1895. IX Richardson's Messages,

p. 592.

11. By President McKinley, announcing a blockade of the Island of Cuba; April 22, 1898. 30 Stat. at L., p. 1769. X Richardson's Messages, p. 202.

12. By President McKinley, declaring certain principles to be observed in the war with Spain concerning neutral flags and goods, blockades, arrival of Spanish vessels at, and departure from, the United States, and the right of search; April 26, 1898. 30 Stat. at L., p. 1770. X Richardson's Messages, p. 204.

13. By President McKinley, enlarging the blockade of Cuba and ex. tending it to San Juan, Porto Rico; June 27, 1898. 30 Stat. at L., p. 1776. X Richardson's Messages, p. 206.

14. By President McKinley, under the protocol of August 12, 1898, (given in full in INSULAR CASES APPENDIX, Vol. I), directing a suspension of hostilities in the war with Spain; August 12, 1898. 30 Stat. at L., p. 1780.

For the proclamations of neutrelity by other nations during the war between the United States and Spain, see For. Rel. C. S., 1898, pp. 841

et seq.

Diplomatic Correspondence. 1. The case of the vessel Colonel Lloyd Aspinwall was referred to two arbitrators by diplomatic correspondence, May 25-June 16, 1870. S. Ex. Doc. 108, 41 Cong. 2d. Sess. For an account of this case, see Moore's History of International Arbitration, Vol. II, p. 1007.

2. By letters in January, 1885, the claim of an American citizen against

SPAIN.

an account of the arbitration under this agreement, see Moore's History of International Arbitration, Vol. II, p. 1055.

3. By letters signed January 10 and 11, 1885, a modus vivendi establishing the most favored nation privileges as to customs dues was concluded. For. Rel. U. S. 1894, p. 632.

SWEDEN.

Treaty.

TREATY OF AMITY AND COMMERCE. Concluded April 3, 1783; proclaimed by the Continental Congress Septem

ber 25, 1783. 8 Stat at L., p. 60; in French and English. U. S. Tr. and Con. 1889, p. 1042.

This treaty terminated by its own limitations in 1798; the articles revived by the treaty of 1816, and by Article XVII of the treaty of 1827, are printed in U. S. Treaties in Force, 1899, p. 601.

The twenty-seven articles and the separate article are:
I. (Peace and friendship.) XIV. Goods on enemy's ships.
II. Most favored nation privi- XV. Instructions to naval ves-
leges.

sels.
III. (Privileges to Swedish sub- XVI. Bond from privateers.

jects in United States.) XVII. Recaptured ships ; omIV. (Privileges to United

bargoes. States citizens in Swe- | XVIII. Regulations for war with den.)

common enemy.
V. Religious freedom.

XIX. Prizes.
VI. Effects of deceased per- XX. (Shipwrecks.)

XXI. Asylum for ships in dis. VII. Commerce in case of war.

tress. VIII. Extent of freedom of com- XXII. Property rights in case of

merce.
IX. Contraband goods.

XXIII. Letters of marque.
X. Goods not contraband. XXIV. (Shipping privileges.)
XI. Ships' papers in case of XXV. Visit of war vessels.

XXVI. (Consuls.)
XII. Navigation in time of war. XXVII. Ratification.
XIII. Detention of contraband Separate article. Duration.

goods, etc.

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war.

war.

SEPARATE ARTICLES. I. Defense of ships in Sweden. IV. Right to trade. II. Defense of ships in United V. Freedom of vessels from States.

search. III. (Mutual protection of merchant vessels.)

Proclamation. The following proclamation concerns the relations of the United States with Sweden:

SWEDEN.

By President Cleveland, under the Act of Congress of March 2, 1895 (28 Stat. at L., p. 727, 733), suspending the prohibition of the importation of cattle from Sweden, and of hides from all parts of the world; November 8, 1895. IX Richardson's Messages, p. 593.

SWEDEN AND NORWAY.

(See also Norway.) Treaties and Conventions.

I. TREATY OF AMITY AND COMMERCE. Concluded September 4, 1816; proclaimed December 31, 1818. 8 Stat.

at. L., p. 232; in French and English. U. S. Tr. and Con. 1889,

p. 1053.

This treaty of fourteen articles expired by its own limitations September 25, 1826, and was replaced by the treaty of 1827. (See U. S. Treaties in Force, 1899, p. 611.)

II. TREATY OF COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION. Concluded July 4, 1827; proclaimed January 19, 1828. 8 Stat. at L.,

p. 346; in French and English. U. S. Tr. and Con. 1889, p. 1058. U. S. Treaties in Force, 1899, p. 611.

The twenty articles are:
I. Freedom of commerce and XI. Shipping privileges.
trade.

XII. Discharge of cargoes.
II. Shipping dues.

XIII. Consular officers and pow. III. No discrimination on im

ers. ports.

XIV. Deserters from ships. IV. No discrimination on ex- XV. Shipwrecks. ports.

XVI. Quarantine. V. Trade with St. Bartholo- XVII. Articles of former treaty mew.

revived. VI. Coastwise trade.

XVIII. Blockade rules. VII. No discrimination in pur- XIX. Duration. chases.

XX. Ratification. VIII. Tonnage, etc., dues. Separate article. Trade with FinIX. No restriction on imports. land. X. Transit privileges, boun

ties, etc.

III. EXTRADITION CONVENTION. Concluded March 21, 1860; proclaimed December 21, 1860. 12 Stat, at

L., p. 1125. U. S. Tr and Con. 1889, p. 1066.

This treaty of seven articles was concluded between the United States and Sweden and Norway. It was superseded as to Norway December 8, 1893, by the treaty of June 7, 1893, and as to Sweden April 17, 1893, by the treaty of January 14, 1893. (See U. S. Treaties in Force, 1899,

SWEDEN AND NORWAY.

IV. NATURALIZATION CONVENTION. Concluded May 26, 1869; proclaimed January 12, 1872. 17 Stat. at L.,

p. 809; in Swedish and English. U. S. Tr. and Con. 1889, p. 1068. U. S. Treaties in Force, 1899, p. 619.

The six articles are: I. Recognition of naturalization. IV. Extradition convention conII. Liability for prior offenses.

tinued. III. Restoration to former citizen- V. Duration. ship.

VI. Ratification.
Protocol,

V. EXTRADITION TREATY. Concluded January 14, 1893; proclaimed March 18, 1893. 27 Stat. at

L., p. 972. U. S. Treaties in Force, 1899, p. 621.

The twelve articles are:
I. Surrender of accused. VIII. Restrictions on trials.
II. Extraditable crimes.

IX. Property seized with fugi. III. Procedure.

tive. IV. Provisional detention.

X. Persons claimed by other V. Nondelivery of citizens.

countries. VI. Political offenses.

XI. Expenses. VII. Limitation.

XII. Effect; ratification.

Proclamations. The following proclamations concern the relations of the United States with Sweden and Norway:

1. By President Johnson revoking the exequaturs of the consuls for Sweden and Norway at New York and New Orleans, respectively; March 26, 1866. VI Richardson's Messages, pp. 428 and 429.

2. By President Johnson annulling the preceding revocation; May 30, 1866. VI Richardson's Messages, p. 432.

3. By President Grant, under the Act of Congress of June 11, 1864 (13 Stat. at L., p. 121), establishing consular courts of Sweden and Norway under said act; May 11, 1872. VII Richardson's Messages, p. 175.

SWITZERLAND.

(Swiss Confederation.) Treaty and Conventions.

I. CONVENTION AS TO PROPERTY RIGHTS. Concluded May 18, 1847; proclaimed May 4, 1848. 9 Stat. at L., Trea

ties p. 100; in French and English. U. S. Tr. and Con. 1889, p. 1071.

This convention of three articles is superseded by the Convention of 1850. (See U. S. Treaties in Force, 1899, p. 626.)

SWITZERLAND. II. CONVENTION OF FRIENDSHIP, COMMERCE AND EXTRADITION. Concluded November 25, 1850; proclaimed November 9, 1855. 11 Stat.

at L., p. 587; in French and English. U.S. Tr. and Con. 1889, p. 1072. U. S. Treaties in Force, 1899, p. 626.

The nineteen articles are as follows: I. Personal and property IX. Export and import duties. privileges.

X. Future commercial priviII. Civil duties and immuni

leges. ties.

XI. Differential duties. III. Return of citizens.

XII. Shipping; shipwrecks. IV. Passports.

XIII. Extradition of accused. V. Real and personal property XIV. Extraditable crimes. rights.

XV. Mutual surrender. VI. Civil suits.

XVI. Expenses. VII. Consular officers and privi- XVII, Political offenses. leges.

XVIII. Duration. VIII. Most favored nation com- XIX. Ratification.

mercial privileges.

III. EXTRADITION TREATY. Signed May 14, 1900; proclaimed February 28, 1901. 31 Stat. at L.,

p. 1928; in French and English.

The fourteen articles are: I. Extradition.

IX. Prosecution only for extraII. Extraditable offenses.

dited crime. III, Accessories extraditable. X. Deferring extradition. IV. Special court.

XI. Persons claimed by two or V. Procedure.

more countries. VI. Provisional arrest.

XII. Disposition of articles seized. VII. Political crimes excepted. XIII. Expenses. VIII. Limitations.

XIV. Repeal of certain articles of

treaty of 1850.

Proclamation. The following proclamation concerns the relations of the United States with Switzerland:

By President Benjamin Harrison, under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1891 (26 Stat. at L., p. 1106), granting the benefit of the copyright laws to the citizens of Switzerland; July 1, 1891. IX Richardson's Messages, p. 147.

Diplomatic Correspondence. By correspondence dated April 27, and May 14, 1883, (published in leaflet by the State Department) a reciprocal registration of trademarks, under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1881 (21 Stat. at L., p.

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