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OREGON ORGANIZING COUNTRY CHILDREN

BY

MUSA GEER

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ESS than ten years ago, State Many prejudices were broken down and,
Superintendent Alderman, in without realizing it, the fathers learned

little Yamhill County school in from the boys much that was efficient. Oregon, saw the children of the school In the meanwhile the Oregon Agricultaking up a collection to buy popcorn. tural College, the coöperating influence At the same time, he saw a plot of vacant between the Oregon farmers and the ground near the school house, and it scientists, established the "extension farm occurred to him that they might better movement.” This not only aids the raise the popcorn than buy it.

parents, but helps the children. ProviFrom that idea 60,000 children have sion was made by the college for a field become better citizens. They have raised worker to visit farming centres all over the not only popcorn, but chickens, pigs, state. Information was given out telling melons, potatoes, asters, roses, almost about ways to increase acreage yield, every thing that grows.

rotation of crops, better market facilities, The State Bankers' Association, when more economical and better cooking. they heard of the idea, called it "earth The schools soon became the social education” and lent their aid to it. Two centres, where a community spirit grew. years later, Mr. O. M. Plummer, secretary This year lantern slides and phonographic and treasurer of the Portland Union records of the world's good music will Stock Yards, became convinced of the instruct and entertain these gatherings. value of the children's work and, through The Oregon State Fair, in 1912, spent his organization, helped to publish fifty $3,500 in prizes for school industrial work. thousand copies of a booklet that gave The railroads and electric lines gave free practical and scientific information on transportation to all displays that were “How to Raise Prize-Winning Pigs." made by the children. One little girl, At the same time, the Commercial Club who lived off the railroad, wheeled her of Portland put out a similar publication prize-winning chickens two miles in a baby on "Boys and Girls on the Egg Problem. buggy to the fair. Another little girl, Both these booklets were distributed to seven years old, put thirty dollars in the the pupils in all parts of the state. bank after the fair was over-her net

Superintendent Alderman wrote the profits from a fifteen-dollar prize on a teachers a letter in which he said:

trained colt, a five-dollar prize for the

biggest watermelon, and other cash prizes Ask the children if they know how to grow for vegetable displays. The best cake potatoes, pumpkins, corn, etc. Ask how many was baked by a twelve-year-old boy. of them like watermelons or muskmelons. Ask

The Oregon legislature of 1913 passed them if they know how to feed chickens; if

a measure providing an appropriation to they know that if they buy three settings of

defray the expenses and salaries of two eggs from one neighbor and three hens from another, and in March put the two together,

industrial field workers, who are to visit they will probably raise some prize winners every county in the state, make a study for the fair. The children of Oregon can

of representative schools in every county, double the egg production in three years. and file reports of existing conditions with

the State Superintendent of Public InA marvelous interest was awakened struction. One result of the hog-raising in the boys and girls of Oregon. Gardens contest in 1912 was that enough pigs were laid out at home and at school. were raised by the boys and girls to supGood work brought good results and ply the Portland Union Stock Yards for gained the hearty support of the parents. three months without any outside help.

ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS ABOUT FARM LANDS

86.-Q. We think of starting a meat mar- wheat, 80,771; coarse forage, 14,705; alfalfa, ket and grocery store in Brooklet, Bulloch 8,658; wild grass, 6,565; and barley, 5,717. County, Georgia, and of raising lots of hogs as well. What do you think of the place and the 89.-Q. A friend and myself, both familplan?

iar with practical and scientific agricultural A. The census of 1910 gives the population methods, think of starting a farm on the order of Brooklet as 361, which we consider scarcely of the Taft Ranch described in the January a large field for the commercial side of your World's Work, though, of course, much plan. The hog-raising phase ought to be well smaller. We wish to raise cattle, hogs, horses, adapted to conditions in the county, in con- poultry, fruit, and vegetables. Our capital nection with general farming. The percentage is $13,000. Which of the following states do of improved land on farms is steadily increas- you consider best suited to our purpose: ing, and the average value of land has risen Arkansas, Texas, California, or Oregon? from $4.48 to nearly $22 an acre in ten years. A. Either the Ozark country of Arkansas We advise a careful study of the United States and Missouri or eastern Texas ought to supply Soil Survey of Bulloch County, 1910, as your the necessary items of cheap land, mild climate, next step.

sufficient rainfall, and sufficient available

acreage to permit future expansion. Soil and 87.-Q. I want to take up a Government climate are excellent in California and western homestead, but hardly know which state to Oregon, but prices are likely to be prohibitive. choose. How would you compare Colorado In our opinion, the success of the Taft Ranch and Minnesota for fruit raising or general depends as much upon the magnitude of its farming on such lands?

operations as upon any other element. As A. Outside of the Government irrigation $13,000 is probably a small fraction of the projects there is to-day comparatively little investment it represents, you are, in this homestead land that is really valuable for respect at least, somewhat handicapped. farming, especially for fruit raising. Such However, many of the details of management opportunities as there are, are likely to be on the Taft place should prove successful on better in Colorado for the specialized types of other farms whether large or small. agriculture, and in Minnesota for general farming and dairying. We suspect that the 90.- Q. Please advise what a young martraveling expenses involved in locating a ried man, in danger of losing a $2,000 satisfactory homestead would almost equal position through a change in his business. the total cost of buying better land that should do with $4,500 as an investment. I could be found with less search.

have a liking for farming, but do you think

two people, willing to work hard, could get a 88.-Q. May I inquire about agricultural living from a small farm for a year or two, conditions in Sherman and Decatur counties, looking toward success later? Kansas? Is there sufficient rainfall, or a A. We believe that two people endowed supply of water for irrigation; and what crops with health, a real love for the country, and, if are grown?

possible, some farm knowledge, could make a A. Conditions in these counties are thor- success of farming with $4,500 in several parts oughly discussed in the Reconnaissance Soil of the country, but it is for you to choose Survey of Western Kansas, 1910, which you whether your investment shall be in this can obtain free from the United States Depart- direction or along financial lines. We frankly ment of Agriculture. For more detailed believe that a good farm will give greater climatic data ask the Weather Bureau at returns for the amount invested than the Washington for Section 38 of the Summary of strongest 4 per cent. or 5 per cent. bonds, but, Climatological Data. The chief crops and of course, the paying ability of the farm detheir acreages in Sherman County, according pends on the investor himself, whereas the to the 1910 census, were: corn, 171,034 acres; return from stocks and bonds does not. You wheat, 54,074; alfalfa, 41,624; wild grasses, must expect, however, to take at least two 21,553; coarse forage, 8,776; and oats, 7,388; years, and probably four or five, to get really and in Decatur County, corn, 109,002 acres; established.

ARTHUR W. PAGE, EDITOR

CONTENTS FOR JULY, 1913

Mr. Cordell Hull

Frontispiece THE MARCH OF EVENTS An EDITORIAL INTERPRETATION

243
Mr. J. F. A. Strong
Dr. Luther H. Gulick

Mr. Clarence J. Owens
Colonel George Pope

Mr. Edwin Hatfield Anderson Dr. John Casper Branner
Senator F. M. Simmons

Governor George H. Hodges Dr. David Starr Jordan
Mr. Norman Hapgood

Governor Hiram W. Johnson The Growth of American Cities

Mr. George W. Wootten A Wider Outlook

Postal Savings Bank Success Lobbyists

An English View of the Japanese Question To Restrict Immigration

More Wine and Ostrich Feathers Selling Our Goods Abroad

Studying Foreign Farming For Cordiality as well as Peace

For a Natural National Highway Mr. Bryan's Peace Plans

A New Profession Who is Bottling Up Alaska?

To Reform Civil Service Reform Tramps

Guiding the Boy Gangs For Freehold Farmers

Better Children to Teach Captains of Industry

Private Pensions for Mothers
The Business of Being a Director

Ancient Customs in Colleges
A Remarkable Study of a Rural Community A County Commission Government
Meeting of Shovels

A Survey of Our Era
The Unnoticed Floods

A Lesson in Investments
The Physical Valuation of Railroads
AN ARCHITECT'S "INVESTMENT” IN STOCKS

- 276 THE INTERLOCKING DIRECTORATES OF WAR

D. S. JORDAN 277 MRS. ANDREW, IRONMASTER (Illustrated) Sarah COMSTOCK 279 A NEW ART IN HEALTH EXHIBITS (Illus.) J. W. HARRINGTON 286 WHO GOVERN THE UNITED STATES II (Illus.) ARTHUR W. Page 293 THE NEW FREEDOM VII

WOODROW WILSON 302 CONSERVATION THAT PAYS ITS WAY

E. T. ALLEN 310 GERMANY: A MODEL OR A WARNING?

Samuel P. ORTH 315 THE TRUTH ABOUT TUBERCULOSIS - - EDGAR ALLEN FORBES 321 AMUSING AMERICA'S MILLIONS (Illustrated) Dana GATLIN 325 CONQUERING THE COST OF LIVING (Illustrated) H. W. Lanier 341 “THE ANGEL OF THE ROUNDHEADS”

G. L. PRICE 349 NINE PATRIOTIC INVENTORS

FRANKLIN FISHER 352 THE MARCH OF THE CITIES PHILADELPHIA's WOOLEN STOCKING

357 FORWARD TO THE LAND

THE VALUE OF GOOD NEIGHBORS
HOSPITALS FOR COUNTRY FOLK

359

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Published monthly. Copyright, 1913, by Doubleday, Page & Company. All rights reserved. Entered at the Post Office at Garden City, N. Y., as second-class mail matter

Country Life in America The Garden Magazine - Farming CHICAGO

GARDEN CITY 1918 Peoples Gas Bldg. DOUBLEDAY, PAGE & COMPANY,

N. Y. F.N. DOUBLEDAY, President H. S. HOUSTON, Vice-President S. A. EVERITT, Treas. RUSSELL DOUBLEDAY,

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Copyright by Harris & Ewing MR. CORDELL HULL REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS FROM THE FOURTH DISTRICT OF TENNESSEE, WHO IS THE AUTHOR OF THE INCOME TAX SECTION OF THE TARIFF BILL WHICH IS THE DEMOCRATIC ADMINISTRATION'S MEASURE TO PUT INTO EFFECT THE 16TH AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION

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T IS a good time to have confidence Each group is afraid that the other will not only in the essential prosperity “play politics” and do them an injury. of the country but in one another. A great deal of money and, what is It is unfortunately a common thing more important, a great many reputations

to hear people in business speak in could be saved if the men of business and condemnation of all men in politics, and the men of politics could come to undersimilarly unfortunate that men in political stand each other with intelligence and life hold an attitude of suspicion toward charity. In both pursuits there are many men of business. The trouble arises indications that American morals are mainly in the difference in their viewpoints. improving and improving rapidly. The It is strikingly exemplified at times by attitude of employers toward labor is very the experiences of business men who different from what it was twenty-five or go into politics, and vice versa. They even fifteen years ago. There is less sharp are confronted with new sets of facts practice than there used to be. And the and conditions which very often make attitude of business toward the public a great difference in the angle of their has changed for the better. In politics, vision. There are, of course, business the last few years have seen vigorous men with no outlook beyond their fights against many forms of “honest pocketbooks, but they are probably graft” that long existed unmolested. fewer than at any other time in the history Campaign contributions with strings to of the country. There are men in politics them are done with, and we have even with narrow views and unworthy purposes, come to a day when a President publicly but even a casual investigation will denounces the profession of lobbyist which convince any one that our politics is has flourished in Washington for generacleaner than ever before. There are tions. With conditions so much improved exceptions in both groups, wicked men and the illegitimate relations between in both business and politics, but the business and politics less and less active, , humanity underlying both classes is much it is surely time to begin to build up a the same, particularly in the ability clearly feeling of mutual confidence and respect to see the shortcomings of the other. between the men in these pursuits.

Copyright, 1913, by Doubleday. Page & Co. All rights reserved

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