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tion he has not gained much in land. But progressive lines.

progressive lines. This is the long, hard perhaps he has in neighbors, and they are path to profits that the pioneers have as important influences on the profits of a been going these hundred years. The farm as the land itself. Neighbors who third way is not to move at all but to stir have the money and the willingness to up the old neighborhoods. For every spend it for good roads and good churches, farmer who has a chance to make a profit who have the patience and wisdom to by moving there are ten who can make work together for their common advance- more money by stirring up their own ment — such neighbors add many dollars communities. For every dollar that the to the value of every acre of land a man eastern railroads can make hauling farmers has. There are two ways of getting such West as passengers they can make ten by neighbors. One is to move to a place increasing the value of the land along where such people live. In that case their lines, by awakening the old comthe newcomer will have to pay for their munities. The unearned increment of company in increased land values. An- good neighbors will double the value of other way is to go to a new district and many a farmer's property, and the quickest grow up with it, helping to mold it into way to get a good neighbor is to be one.

HOSPITALS FOR COUNTRY FOLK

R. E. E. MUNGER, of Spen- female population of the state; and that cer, la., has for several these diseases and accidents are especially years advocated the estab- frequent in the country, away from proper lishment of county hospitals medical attention, and that they are

that should serve especially largely preventable and curable under the rural population of the state. Dr. hospital care. Munger was one of the men who were of Dr. Munger wrote his rural hospital great help to President Roosevelt's Coun- plan into a bill which the legislature of try Life Commission, and the report of Iowa enacted into law. The first county that commission greatly aided him in to take advantage of this new law was carrying out the purposes he had in mind Washington County. The people voted in his hospital plan, by enlisting national $30,000 worth of bonds, a public spirited sympathy for the improvement of rural citizen bought eleven acres of land and life. His plan was that the state should donated it for a site, and the board of pass a law to permit counties to bond trustees, after visiting most of the hospitals themselves for the erection of hospitals in the upper Mississippi Valley and after in the farming districts.

consulting more than a hundred hospital Dr. Munger conducted a dignified but workers, agreed on plans. The building striking campaign of education to bring was completed and opened to the public about the passage of such a law. He last July. It is fireproof and is equipped pointed out in the newspapers that whereas with every convenience for surgical, inDes Moines had one hospital bed for every fectious, and maternity cases. 275 inhabitants, thirty-seven counties in Kansas and Indiana have recently lowa, containing more than half a million passed laws based upon the law of lowa, inhabitants, had no hospital advantages and legislators of other states are studying of any kind. That two million people of the plan with an interest that will probably rural lowa had access to only 799 hospital soon show results. In lowa itself, Jefferbeds, or an average of one bed to every son County also has under construction a 3,000 people. He showed also that the county hospital under this Act. Dr. Munaverage yearly death rate from the dis- ger's vision and effective enthusiasm have eases and accidents incident to childbirth created a new and helpful agency for the amounted to nearly one per cent. of the betterment of life on the land.

ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS ABOUT FARM LANDS

91.-Q. Is the Delaware-Maryland penin- A. According to the census of 1910, 39 sula well adapted to the growing of white per cent. of the county was included in its potatoes commercially?

3,421 farms, of which 1,457 were occupied by A. Only for the raising of early, short

whites and 1,964 by non-whites. Forty-five season types. The soils are generally too per cent. of the farm land was improved. The light and the climate too warm for the pro- chief crops for 1910 were cotton (44,024 acres), duction of a main, all-summer crop, which is the corn (29,070 acres), hay and forage (2,579 more important from the commercial stand- acres), and fruit, chiefly peaches, plums, and point.

apples.

92.- Q. I am offered 400 acres of cut-over 95.- Q. Some time ago I read that the land in Hernando County, Florida. Can this price of farm land in New York was, in a general be used for general farming or grazing? What way, $7 an acre. What is the situation at would be a fair price per acre?

present? A. We know of no reason for the failure of A. Your source of information must have either of these types of farming on such land, been rather antiquated, for although there but the census figures for 1910 suggest that may yet be some land that may be bought for they are at present less important than horti- $7, the average for the state in 1910 was $32.13. culture. There were in 1910 only 554 dairy In every county but twelve the figure ranged cows, 49 calves, and 807 head of other cattle between $10 and $50. In four of the excepin the county. The value of the hay and tions, along the Great Lakes, the development forage raised was only $7,243, whereas it was of orchards keeps the average price between $27,437 for fruit and nuts, and $37,207 for $62 and $85. In the eight others, grouped vegetables. The cereal crop, valued at $41,280, around New York City, average values of of which about eight ninths was for corn, sug

farm land, according to the 1910 census, gests, however, the possibilities of such crops. range from $124 on eastern Long Island to

The average value of farm land is about $2,591 in Kings County. $22, but whether the acreage you have in mind is better or worse than the average, you can tell 96.-Q. Can you tell me of any man or only by examining it.

firm who can inspect and report on 70 acres of

land at the north end of Lake Worth, Florida, 93.-Q. Where are the best apple-growing or can you tell me about the suitability of the regions of the country?

section for orange growing? A. Passing from the West to the East, the A. We know of no one who makes it his sections that have become renowned as apple business to examine and criticise land, but the producing localities are: certain valleys (Hood State Experiment Station at Gainesville, River, Rogue River, Bitter Root, Boise River, the Commissioner of Agriculture at Tallaetc.) in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and hassee and the United States Bureau of Plant Montana; sections of Colorado; the Ozark Industry (Washington, D. C.) through its country of Missouri and Arkansas; the lake Florida demonstration agent may be able to shore district of Michigan; the uplands of help you. In the section you refer to the mean Ohio and West Virginia; a belt of counties lying annual temperature is 73 degrees Fahrenheit, along Lake Erie; the central part of the state and killing frosts occur, on the average, between and the Hudson River valley in New York; November 18th and April 7th. We would consouthwestern Maine; and the foothills of the sider it therefore a rather dangerous location Appalachian range, from Vermont and New for citrus fruit growing, although 8,510 orange, Hampshire, southward into northern Georgia, 6,840 grape fruit, and 84 lemon trees are reincluding the upper altitudes of New Jersey ported in the county (Palm Beach) in the and Delaware.

census of 1910. Pineapples represent the

bulk of the $259,700 worth of fruit raised, but 94.-Q. What proportion of the land in that vegetable growing is a more important Ashley County, Arkansas, is cultivated, and industry is indicated by the sum of $530,728, what are the principal crops?

the value of the truck crops grown.

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" IN THE HANDS OF RECEIVERS"

386 FEWER AND BETTER DOCTORS

FRANK P. STOCKBRIDGE 388 THE AMERICAN “HOME SECRETARY” (Illus.) B. J. HENDRICK 396 WHAT THE I. W. W. IS (Illustrated)

ARNO Dosch 406 NEW LIGHT ON CANCER

JAMES MIDDLETON 420 WILLARD, OF THE B. & O.

C. M. KEYS 427 WHAT I AM TRYING TO DO -

B. F. Harris 433 HOW CANADA PREVENTS STRIKES - W. L. MACKENZIE KING 438 A WOMAN OF ACHIEVEMENT (Illustrated) - Sarah COMSTOCK 444 MORE SHIPS THAN EVER BEFORE (Illus.) EDWARD Neville Vose 449 ABRAHAM CAHAN, A LEADER OF THE JEWS FRENCH STROTHER 470 TOO MANY CHURCHES

EVERETT T. TOMLINSON 475 THE MARCH OF THE CITIES

479

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Published monthly. Copyright, 1913, by Doubleday, Page & Company. All rights reserved. Entered at the Post Office at Garden City, N. Y., as second-class mail matter

Country Life in America The Garden Magazine - Farming 1518 Peoples Gas Bldg. DOUBLEDAY, PAGE & COMPANY, GARDEN CITY

F.N. DOUBLEDAY, President

H. S. HOUSTON, Vice-President

S. A. EVERITT, Treas.

RUSSELL DOUBLEDAY, Sec'y

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MR. DANIEL WILLARD PRESIDENT OF THE BALTIMORE & OHIO RAILROAD COMPANY AND ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT FIGURES IN THE NEW EMPIRE OF AMERICAN RAILROADS WHOSE REPRESENTATIVE HE IS IN THE CONTROVERSY OVER THE PROPOSED INCREASES IN WAGES TO TRAINMEN AND IN THE PROPAGANDA FOR PERMISSION TO INCREASE FREIGHT RATES

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W

E ARE living in a most of progress has broken down — when our interesting time in politics and industry were sick. And the American life. We are convalescence from the operation of war trying out legally and has been long and costly.

industrially the great The old saying, “Happy is the nation combinations built up in the last ten whose annals are few,” is true when you or fifteen years. We are going to see think of annals, as most of our historians what greater strides we can make in in- do, as being in a large part the records of dustry without a protective tariff; we are wars. But wars do not mark the progress going to try a new currency plan, the first of a people. They mark their worst in fifty years or more; and we are cleaning periods. The real annals of a people are up politics and business at an amazing the exploits of the men of inventive genius rate. Mr. Lamar, with his boasted vil- and constructive minds who make possible lainies, and Mr. Lauterbach, with his ex- the ever-improving standards of life. aggerations, are products of the past.

If we had not made a tremendous These changes in our economic and mistake in economics — the mistake of political life deserve much more attention believing slave labor to be efficient — we than they usually get. As a nation we should not have had the Civil War. If neglect these things. As children we are we did not still mistakenly believe that taught American history as a series of wars, cheap foreign labor is efficient we might from the conflicts with the Indians and the

escape some future industrial strife. French, down through the Revolution, the Weare in an era of construction and progMexican War, and the Civil War to our ress. It is a good time and place in which conquest of the Spanish islands. The to work and to live, and whether you look at true history of the United States is a suc- it merely from the present standpoint or cession of economic and political steps, take a broader view, the prospect is cheerful. here and there interrupted by war. Our Our crops are good, our industries are more serious wars have been operations busy, the tariff and the currency are in a on the body politic. They have come fair way to be improved, and our standards only when some of the regular machinery of living are getting better year by year.

Copyright, 1913, by Doubleday, Page & Co. All rights reserved

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