A System of Chemistry of Inorganic Bodies, Volumen2

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Baldwin & Cradock, London; and William Blackwood, Edinburgh., 1831

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Página 48 - When this motion appears to have entirely ceased, even in the halffilled vessel, it is a sign that the fermentation is finished; and therefore the vinegar is then to be put into casks close stopped, and kept in a cool place. " A greater or less degree of warmth accelerates or checks this, as well as the spirituous fermentation. In France it is finished in about fifteen days, during the summer ; but if the heat of the air be very great, and exceed...
Página 369 - Baikal in Siberia. It is white, melts when heated, and on cooling assumes the consistence of white cerate. It readily dissolves in alcohol, and in other respects it possesses the characters of a solid volatile oil.
Página 335 - Let a drop of the volatile oil fall upon a sheet of writing-paper, and then apply a gentle heat to it. If it evaporates without leaving any stain upon the paper, the oil is pure ; but if it leaves a stain, it has been contaminated with some fixed oil or other. Volatile oils are almost all obtained from vegetables, and they exist in every part of...
Página 409 - ... explosion. The more intimate is the mixture, the better is the powder ; for since nitre does not detonate, except when in contact with inflammable matter, the whole detonation will be more speedy, the more numerous the surfaces in contact. After the paste has dried a little, it is placed upon a kind of sieve full of small holes, through which it is forced. By that process it is divided into grains, the size of which depends upon the size of the holes through which they have passed. The powder...
Página 751 - The eruTT7)2/a of the Greeks, and the alumen of the Romans, was a native substance which appears to have been nearly related to green vitriol, or sulphate of iron; and which consequently was very different from what we at present denominate alum.
Página 458 - It is soluble in twenty times its weight of water, at the temperature of 60°, and six times its weight of boiling water. When exposed to the air, it effloresces slowly and slightly. When heated, it swells, loses about...
Página 213 - ... parts of water, and boil the mixture for some minutes in a glass vessel. The blue colour disappears, and the mixture becomes yellowish green. Pour it upon a filter; and after all the liquid part has passed, pour 10 parts of hot water through the filter to wash the residuum completely. The oxide of mercury decomposes prussian blue, separates its colouring matter, and forms with it a salt soluble in water. The liquid therefore which has passed through the filter contains the colouring matter combined...
Página 440 - Salts of Soda. — In general, the salts of soda are much more soluble in water than those of potash. Many of the salts of the latter alkali contain no water of crystallization ; but most of the salts of soda contain a great deal. One of the easiest methods of ascertaining whether the base of a given salt be soda, is to determine the shape of the crystals which it forms. If it does not shoot into regular crystals, separate the acid by means of sulphuric or nitric acid, and let the newformed salt...
Página 370 - ... when heated, and burn with a strong smell, a bright flame, and much smoke : they are insoluble in water and alcohol, but dissolve most commonly in ether, and in the fixed and volatile oils ; they do not dissolve in alkaline leys, nor form soap ; acids have little action on them ; the sulphuric scarcely any ; the nitric, by long and repeated digestion, dissolves them, and converts them into a yellow substance, soluble both in water and alcohol, and similar to the product formed by the...
Página 93 - ... of the above milk of lime are first put upon it. They are mixed well together, and thus successively the rest of the mixture of lime and water is added. If it were poured in all at once, the benzoin, instead of mixing with it, would grow lumpy.

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