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VOLUME 5:1-3

January 5 March

1901

Missing

THE RIVERSIDE ART

ART SERIES

Edited by ESTELLE M, HURLL Gives full-page representative pictures of representative artists, with full information, including the stories which the pictures illustrate.

It is a good preparation or substitute for Foreign Travel. It appeals to Teachers of Art as a text to Teachers of Literature as supplementary reading, and to all others who wish to have at hand the most important things in and abont art.

Issues for the Present School Year

RAPHAEL (October),

MICHELANGELO (February,) REMBRANDT (December), JEAN FRANCOIS MILLET (April).

64 Representative Pictures with 332 Pages of Text.

40 cents, net.

Each book, about 100 pages, 12mo, Paper, 30 cents, net; clo.

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:

The four numbers, paper $1.00; cloth, $1.50, postpaid.

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FIFTY-TWO Professors and Instructors give a total of eighty-three Courses in the following named subjects:

Ancient and Modern Languages, English Literature, Science and Art of Education, Psychology, Ethics, History, Political and Social Science, Mathematice, Physics, Chemistry, Botany, Geology and Physiography, Geography, Physiology, Drawing and Art, Mechanical Drawing and Designing, Shop-work in the Mechanic Arts, and Natare Study.

ООООООООООООООО

The instruction is suited to High School and other teachers, and to Professors, graduates and undergraduates of Colleges.

Matriculated students of the University, whether graduate or undergraduate, may receive credit to the extent of ten University hours. Others receive certificates of attendance and of work satisfactorily done.

A Single Tuition Fee of $25 for the entire Summer Session is charged.
ITHACA Summer temperature is but little higher than that experienced at Saranac
O Lake and Lake George. For full announcement and book of viewe, address

THE REGISTRAR,
CORNELL UNIVERSITY,

ITHACA, N. Y.
0000000000

TWENTIETH CENTURY

CENTURY TEXT-BOOKS

NOW READY

A HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN NATION. ByANDREW C. McLaughlin

Professor of American History in the University of Michigan. 12mo, cloth, $1.40. PLANT RELATIONS. A First Book of Botany. By John M. COULTER, A.M.

Ph.D., Head Professor of Botany in the University of Chicago. 12m, cloth, $1.10. PLANT STRUCTURES. A Second Book in Botany. By John M. COULTER, A.M Ph.D., Head Professor of Botany in the University of Chicago. 12mo, cloth, $1.20. This second book takes up plant structures, functions and classification, and may

precede the first book if preferred. It is designed to cover the work of one-half the school year in either of the first two years of a high-school course.

ENGLISH TEXTS SHAKSPERE'S MACBETH. Edited by RICHARD JONES, Ph.D. ADDISON'S SIR ROGER DE COVERLEY PAPERS. Edited by Professor FRANKLIN T.

BAKER, A.M. SELECTIONS FROM MILTON'S SHORTER POEMS. Edited by F. D. NICHOLS. MACAULY'S ESSAYS ON MILTON AND ADDISON, Edited by GEORGE B. AITON, A.M. DRYDEN'S PALAMON AND ARCITE. Edited by GEORGE M. MARSHALL, Ph.B.

Uniform binding. Cloth, 50 cents: boards. 40 cents. Send for complete prospectus. D. APPLETON & COMPANY, Publishers NEW YORK

BOSTON

CHICAGO

USE THE BEST For Draughting-Sketching

Eagle No. 314 Draughting, or No. 251 Nerograph. For Free Hand Drawing

Eagle Standard Nos. 172, 272, 372. For Vertical Writing

Eagle Vertical Steel Pens No. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. For Shading, or Ordinary Writing

Eagle Steel Pens No. E 120, 170, 370, 410, 460, 480.
Colored Pencils Eagle Pencil Compass No. 569
All Colors.

Has no equal.
Send for samples and mention this publication.
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NEW YORK

SERIES-VOL. V.
SERIESGOLDEN ERA-VOL. XLIV

SAN FRANCISCO, APRIL, 1900.

NUMBER 4 ESTABLISHED 1852

с THE LOVE AND STUDY OF NATURE:

A PART OF EDUCATION.*

BY DR. G. STANLEY HALL, PRESIDENT CLARK UNIVERSITY, WORCESTER.

Y subject, "The Love and Study of Nature,” is both very old and very worn.

Nature has always been studied and such work has always been approved.

Trite and hackneyed as the theme is, however, you will all admit that study is one of the most ennobling occupations of man, that love is the highest sentiment, and that nature in its broadest sense is the largest theme in the world; so that at the outset it must be evident that in the limited time at my disposal I can only touch my rast theme at a few points, and these in only the most general terms.

To begin with, I wish to urge that science, art, literature, religion and human history and society are the five great objects, not only of education, but of human interests. Nearly all of the courses of study in the world have been framed of the material in these departments, and every one of them roots in the love and study of nature.

This may not seem obvious without a little reflection. Let us therefore glance at the history of each of these departments, --first, of science.

I. Astronomy, for instance, which originated with Eudoxus and Hipparchus and was developed by Copernicus, Gallileo and Kepler, is a creation of one of the sublimest of all human interests, that in the heavens above us. From Tycho Brahe, isolating himself on his lonely island for years to devote himself more exclusively to the stars, down to Professor Pickering, in his all-night work in photographing the entire sky on a vast co-operative plan; Professor Holden, at the summit of Mount Hamilton; Mr. Lowell, on Chimborazo, trying to settle the vexed problem of canals in Mars; the late Dr. Gould, in his long years of voluntary exile from home in South America; Professor Todd, on his eclipse expeditions,—all are animated by this great love, and the whole science of astronomy was created by its saints, martyrs and hermits, smitten, by the great passion to push knowledge to its remotest bounds, that mankind might know something concerning infinite space and its stellar population.

Physics and chemistry, to those who know their history from Roger and Sir Francis Bacon thru the period of alchemy and the black arts; botany, which has tempted men into inhospitable lands, sometimes dangerous, and generally involving more or less hardship; biology, consecrated by the service of all sorts and conditions of devotees, from Linnæus, Lamarck, Cuvier, St. Hilaire and Audubon, down to Darwin, Hagen, and all the Challenger and other expeditions; geography, from Marco Polo to Stanley and Nansen; geology, from Pliny down; anatomy, from Haller

*A lecture delivered before the State Board of Agriculture of Massachusetts.

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