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admirably adapted for small coasters; the fresh water is close to it, and an anchor could easily be landed on the jetty, to which they would secure. The passages between the outer reefs are quite clear. The return of very strong breezes compelled us to get into Champion Bay, for, after we left the small bay, the sea ran so high that it required one man constantly to bale the boat.

At l the three horses were seen near the Chapman, and by 2 the exploring party were down. Messrs. Gregory's report was highly favourable: they passed over an excellent country, as shown by the subjoined journal.

20th.- At 6 h. 30 m. started from Champion Bay, following the beach till 6 h. 35 m., when we turned N. 87° E. over a scrubby country; at 7 crossed the Chapman, at 8 Mount Fairfax bearing S. 4 mile; turned N. 66° E., the country very thinly dotted with wattle, scrub, and some grass. At 8 b. 30 m. crossed a large branch of the Chapman with several small pools of water, the banks high and steep; the country then became more scrubby, with gravelly soil; at 9 altered our course to N. 18° E. and at 9h. 30m. crossed the Chapman, below a small pool of water apparently permanent; 9 h. 50 m. passed over a granite ridge, when the country improved and several fine patches were seen to the eastward; at 10 h. 20 m. ascended a high flat-topped hill of red sandstone resting upon granite, which proved to be the eastern part of Moresby's flat-topped range ; from this summit Mount Fairfax and Wizard Peak were visible. To the eastward the hills were apparently grassy and gradually rose from the Chapman for 8 or 10 miles; at 11 came on a large party of natives, some of whom accompanied us for one mile, pointing out several places where we could obtain water; at 11 h. 10 m. turned N.E. and entered an extensive valley with patches of grass, but not of a good quality; at 30 m. crossed a watercourse trending to the westward, following it for half a mile, we turned N.W. over a scrubby flat till I h. 5 m., when we struck the bed of a small stream, with several small pools of water in it. Halted for dinner, then renewed our route up the stream to the northward ; at 3 it turned to the east, we therefore halted for the night by a small pool with good feed on the banks.

21st.--At 6 h. 35 m. continued our route N. over a hilly country of scrub and grass, with York gums and wattle; the prevailing rocks were quartz, red sandstone, and granite ; at 8 h. 30 m. crossed the bed of a stream 8 yards wide with brackish pools; at 8 h. 50 m. came upon a good grassy country, which appeared to extend 8 or 10 miles E. and N. Clumps of York gums, sandalwood, jam, and black wattle were observed on some of the hills; crossed several inconsiderable watercourses, some trending E. and others W., till 9h. 45 m., when we ascended an elevated

sandy table-land covered with short scrub; at 10h. 35m., not seeing any immediate improvement to the northward, changed the course to the west ; following a deep gully, we struck a small stream trending S.S.W. with numerous small pools of brackish and salt water, traced it down till 11 h. 25 m., when we found a small hole scratched in the bed between two salt pools; the water in the hole was perfectly fresh. Halted till 12 h. 53 m, when we resumed a westerly course, crossing several deep grassy valleys running to the S. At 1 h. 35 m. turned 211° over a hilly quartz and granite country, with very good grass in the valleys and on the tops of the hills; at 2 h. 30 m. again struck the stream bed, the country improving, being covered with grass and thinly scattered jam and black wattle as far as the eye could reach. At 3h. 50 m. this stream being joined by another from the eastward, turned N.N.W.; following its course, at 4h. 30 m. passed a brackish pool, and at 5 bivouacked in the bed of the stream, obtaining water by digging a few inches in the sand.

22nd.At 6 left our bivouac and steered 210° over a fine grassy country; at 7 ascended a small ironstone hill, from which we observed a deep valley trending S.W. In the N. and W. the grassy country extended for at least 10 or 12 miles, presenting to our view 50,000 or 60,000 acres of sheep pasture of a fine description; continued a S.W. course over a granite country with some good patches of grass, but not equal to that passed yesterday; at 8 crossed a small stream bed, which we considered to be the Bowes of Captain Grey ; we then ascended the steep limestone hills on the western bank of the stream, from which we observed the large sandpatch on Point Moore bearing 170°; turning south we crossed the mouth of the Bowes, quite dry, then altered to S.E., with the intention of tracing Captain Grey's route towards Champion Bay; after traversing sandy downs resting on limestone, about 4 miles, came on a deep ravine in the limestone hills: one of the horses being footsore we were obliged to return to the beach, which we followed to Champion Bay, where we arrived at 1, passing the mouths of the Buller and Chapman, and another small stream.

23rd. -- Employed getting the horses on board, before the northerly wind got too fresh; they looked a good deal fatigued; by 9 we were under weigh, and with strong headwinds did not reach this until 27th.

With regard to the practicability of getting the coal down, I think there can be no doubt it could be done; the road by which we returned offered no difficulties but such as would easily be surmounted; the chief one would be the gullies, running out from the table-land near which it lay, but this would be very easily done, by a road being cut at the foot; that there is plenty

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Pub. for the Journal of the Royal Geographical Society by John Murray, Albemarle S'London 1818.

sandy table-land covered with short scy seeing any immediate improvement to the course to the west ; following a de stream trending S.S.W. with numer and salt water, traced it down till 1 small hole scratched in the bed betr in the hole was perfectly fresh. we resumed a westerly course, cro running to the S. At 1 h. 35 m and granite country, with very the tops of the hills; at 2 h. 3 the country improving, being tered jam and black wattle 3h. 50 m. this stream being turned N.N.W.; following brackish pool, and at 5 bis taining water by digging a

22nd -At 6 left our grassy country; at 7 asc we observed a deep valle grassy country extended our view 50,000 or 6 scription; continued a some good patches of day; at & crossed a s the Bowes of Captai stone hills on the observed the large turning south we ci altered to S.E., wi towards Champio: limestone, about hills: one of the ! to the beach, whi rived at l, passir another small st

23rd.— Emp northerly wind by 9 we were u reach this unti

With regar think there ca we returned o surmounted ; from the tabl easily done, b

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wal there can be no doubt, and the river running over what

saw would not be a difficulty, as the shaft could be sunk on .iher bank.

I have several reasons for supposing Champion Bay safe during winter, although open to the northward and westward; the first is the low sand beach, then the vegetation growing close to the high water mark, say 20 yards, whilst all the beach to the southward of Point Moore was blown into high ridges, and was generally about 30 or 40 yards wide : from all I observed I should say that if northerly gales reach there, they must be very much more moderate ; but in Port Grey there was evident proof of the effect of southerly winds.

The small snug harbour in Port Grey is quite sheltered, and admirably fitted for small vessels loading or unloading.

There was a great want of timber over the whole country; but I do not think there is any doubt that water could be obtained anywhere.

Fremantle, 31 Dec. 1846.

VI.- Memorandum respecting an old Globe (supposed date about

1520) in the Public Library of Frankfort-on-Maine ; brought there from a Monastery about sixty years ago. By Mr. H.

BLANCHARD.
Date of discoveries (America).

America.- Columbus (born 1435) left Palos on the 3rd of August, 1492; by the 7th of October he had sailed 750 leagues to the westward of the Canaries, and expected to find the island of Cipangi (Japan). He discovered land that evening, viz., St. Salvador, one of the Bahamas; he arrived at Cuba on the 28th of October, still believing himself to be in Asia ; and, coasting the N. side of Hispaniola, returned to Spain.

On the 25th of September, 1493, he sailed on his second voyage from Cadiz; maile Dominica and Guadaloupe, surveyed Hispaniola, Jamaica, and Cuba, and returned.

On the 20th of May, 1498, he sailed from St. Lucar on his third voyage; made Trinidad and the main land adjacent, thence bearing up for Hispaniola, he returned to Spain under arrest. During this voyage Ojeda sailed from Spain (having Amerigo Vespucci on board his ship) on a voyage in which he coasted from Trinidad to near Darien.

On the 9th of May, 1502, Columbus sailed on his fourth voyage from Cadiz, his attention being wholly directed to discover the strait which he supposed to exist between N. and S. America. He

Durings up for Mia Trinidads, he saileturned. Caloupe, si

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