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PRE FACE.

On an occasion so interesting to the Editors as the completion of their HUNDREDTH VOLUME, they were induced in the Preface to the first part of that Volume), to enter somewhat at length into the history of the GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE ; accompanied by remarks on the various kinds of information to be found in the long series of their labours. To that Preface, to avoid repetition, they beg leave confidently to refer their readers. It exhibits the principles by which the Gentleman's Magazine has always been governed ; and those principles will still continue to influence its conductors.

Warmly attached as they are to the Crown, Religion, Laws, and Institutions of their country, they cannot conceal their anxiety in these stirring times. After so many thousands of lives have been sacrificed, and millions of treasure expended, it is melancholy to reflect that the overthrow of the great Tyrant of France has not effected the main object for which it was intended—the re-establishment of permanent peace, on the bases of Religion and Loyalty. Napoleon, by suppressing Anarchy through Despotism, controlled the insurrectionary spirit; nor would he have suffered such a spirit to have been dominant in Flanders, Italy, Spain, Portugal, or Poland. It is very true that he would have made the population soldiers fighting under the banners of France; but no soldiers, because they are dependent men, are or can be real republicans, in conduct or action. If we have extinguished the despotism of Napoleon, we have only resuscitated the spirit of insubordination which existed before he attained eminence, and though we have captured the French artillery, their mines have exploded; while the vain nation has achieved the moral conquest of influencing the opinions of the people of all countries, and of rousing a physical action utterly invincible. It would be premature to hazard a prognostication concerning events, which have made all Europe a volcano in eruption. Placing our trust in a superior Power, we wait the results.

Nor will we indulge in commonplace, concerning the tendency of a democratic spirit when in contention with aristocracy. We shall only

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say, that when Law has obtained that domination which commands obedience, the middle ranks know their security; and when knowledge is diffused, their competency to contend with prescriptional claims. It has ever been the result of a commercial and monied establishment in a nation to overpower hereditary aristocracy. Government, in all nations, began with clans, and was followed by Timocracy (the amount of property determining the share of governing power), and this was in turn overthrown by Democracy, the leaders becoming in the end tyrants.

To use the words of the Editor of Madame du Deffand's Letters, recently published,

“ The great question of numerical majorities marshalled against all exclusive institutions, and against all accumulations of property, seems about to be placed in the most unequivocal terms before all the Governments of Europe. On the manner in which they receive and reply to these intimations depend such fearful chances as the mind almost recoils from investigating. On the one side, more popular institutions may be feared, as possibly leading to a want of public peace and security; on the other side, strengthening the arm of power in the old institutions, may serve only to envenom opposition, and produce prolonged disorder."

May our beloved King and his Ministers steer the safe course between these opposite extremes; and thus prove themselves to be the happy means, under Providence, of handing down our glorious Constitution in Church and State, to the latest posterity.

June 30, 1831.

THE

GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE.

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[PUBLISHED FEBRUARY 1, 1831.] London Gaz.-Times-Ledger

Norwich, Oxf., Portsm.. Pres. Morn. Chron.--- Post llerald

ton. Sherb., Shrewsb., SouthMorn. Advertises---Courier

amplon, Truro, Worcester 2... Globe. Standard. Sun.Star

Aylesbury, Bangor, Barnst., Brt. Trav. Record-Lit Gaz

Berwick, Blackb., Bridgew.. St. James's Chron. Packet..

Carmar., Colch., Chesterf , Even. Mail.--Eaglish Chron.

Devizes, Dorch., Doncaster, 8 Weekly Pa...29 Sat. & Sun. 0

Falmouth. Glouc., Halifax. Dublio it. Edinburgh 19

Henley. Hereford, LancasLiverpool 9-Manchester 7

ter, Leaming Lewes, Linc. Exeter 6. Bath, Bristol, Sh.ef

Litchf. Macelesf. Newark, field, York, 4 - Brighton,

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Newc. on-Tyne, Northamp., Canterbury. Leeds, Hull.

Reading, Rochest., Salish, Leicester, Nottingh. Plym.

Staff., Stockport, Taunton, Stamf. 3.... Birming. Bolton.

Swansea, Wakef., Warwick, Bary, Cambridge, Carlisle,

Whiteh., Winches.. Windsor, Chelmsf.,Cheltenh , Chester,

Wolverhampton, 1 each. Coved., Derty, Durh., Ipsw..

Ireland 61--Scotland 37
Keodal, Maidst , Newcastle,

Jersey 4-Guernsey 3
JANUARY, 1831.
Original Communications.

Review of Dew Publications.
MINOR CORRESPONDENCE

History of Ipswich .....

...41 History of Tithes........

Hunter's English Monastic Libraries.........44 Castle and Family of Poligosc..........

Pinkerton's Correspondence......... ..46 Priory of Hurley, Berkshire

Wilson's Memoirs of De Foe. ........ 49 Lady Place, Hurley......

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Excerpta Historica Lovelace, Wilcocks, & Kempenfelt Families 11 Logan's Scottish Gaël..... Notices of the Family of Copinger .........12 Nicolas's State of Historical Literature......60 Foreign Literary Fragments..........

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Palgrave's Reply to Mr. Nicolas Critical Remarks on French Writers......... 16 Moore's Life of Byron.......

.64 Syrian Christians of St. Thomas in India...ib. A Clergyman's Advice to his Flock, &c...67, 68 Trial by Combat, temp. Richard II ......... 18

FINE ARTS. .............. Organic Remains at Blackdown Hills, Devon 19 | LITERARY INTELLIGENCE.--New Publications 70 Geological Effects of the Deluge....... .21 Meetings of Societies, Fairfax Papers, On the Author of Chobeleth............... 22 Savings Banks, Letter from Mr. Tooke to Dr. Johnson and Bruce the Traveller......... 28 Lord Brougham on Local Courts, &c... 71-74 On Breaking the Line in Naval Tactics ...ib. ANTIQUARIAN Researches, 75.- Poetry ... 76 On the Children of Edw. IV......... ...ib.

Distorical Chronicle. Christening of the Princess Bridget, 1480...25

ForeignNews, 77.--Domestic Occurrences....78 Classical Literature.

Promotions, 79-Marriages, &c................ 80 Cambridge Prize Compositions............26, 27

OBITUARY; with Memoirs of Lord Henley, New Translation of the Psalms............... 28

Hon. P. Roper, Count Lipsingen, Visc'tess On the Greek Sapphic Ode at Cambridge...31

Massareene, Capt. Sir R.C. Spencer, Archd. Game of “ Micatio Digitorum" ....

Parkinson, F.R.S., T. Sherwood, M.D. &c. 81 The recent Proceedings on the proposed Re Bill of Mortality.–Markets, 94.—Shares ...95 moval of the Screen at York Minster 33-40 | Meteorological Diary.—Prices of Stocks Embellished with Views of Lady Place at Hurley, Berks; the Interior of a

Room at the TANKARD INN, Ipswich ;
And a Representation of the ANCIENT DUCKING-STOOL.

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By SYLVANUS URBAN, GENT.

Printed by J. B. Nichols and Son, Cicero's HEAD, 25, Parliament Street, Westminster ;

where all Letters to the Editor are requested to be seat, Post-Paid.

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St. Peter's Church, Hammersmith
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FRONTISPIECE.
St. John's Chapel, Bethnal Green
View of Lady Place, at Hurley, Berks.........
Interior of a Room at the Tankard Inn, Ipswich......
* Ropresontution of an ancient Ducking Stool.........
Town of Ham in Picardy. ...
*Monumental Enligy of Archbishop Tregury, in St. Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin......... 198
Plan of the Improvements near Charing Cross........
*The New Buildings in West Strand.
*The Lowther Arcado...............
Miscellaneous Antiquities, consisting of Coins, Rings, &C..........
*Romalom at St. Michaela, Crooked Lane........

295 Ho. Mary's Chupel, Lambeth ............

297 Trinity Church, Chelson............

.... ib. View of Rowdoll, in the Parish of Washington, Sussex. ........ Vlow of Nhermanbury Placo, Sussex........

il. * Earthen Jar found in a Danish Port at Ballyvolane near Cork ..... Lebowood Church, Shropshiro....... Longnor C'hmpel, Shropshire.........

il. Clifton Momponelom Bike.............

...... 401 * Auclent Noulpture of St. George, in the Porch of Ruerdean Church, Gloucestershire 404 All Malmes' Churoli, Poplar......... Wout lackney (hurelt.................

.... ib. Monument of Laurence Neymour at Mighinn Ferrars...... *The Grave of Mihop Ken at Brome, Somersetohire. ('owolorp Onk, Vorhwhile, *Roman Antiquities found at Crendon in Buckinghamshire...... ............. 580, 581

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PRE FACE.

On an occasion so interesting to the Editors as the completion of their HUNDREDTH VOLUME, they were induced in the Preface to the first part of that Volume), to enter somewhat at length into the history of the GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE ; accompanied by remarks on the various kinds of information to be found in the long series of their labours. To that Preface, to avoid repetition, they beg leave confidently to refer their readers. It exhibits the principles by which the Gentleman's Magazine has always been governed ; and those principles will still continue to influence its conductors.

Warmly attached as they are to the Crown, Religion, Laws, and Institutions of their country, they cannot conceal their anxiety in these stirring times. After so many thousands of lives have been sacrificed, and millions of treasure expended, it is melancholy to reflect that the overthrow of the great Tyrant of France has not effected the main object for which it was intended—the re-establishment of permanent peace, on the bases of Religion and Loyalty. Napoleon, by suppressing Anarchy through Despotism, controlled the insurrectionary spirit ; nor would he have suffered such a spirit to have been dominant in Flanders, Italy, Spain, Portugal, or Poland. It is very true that he would have made the population soldiers fighting under the banners of France; but no soldiers, because they are dependent men, are or can be real republicans, in conduct or action. If we have extinguished the despotism of Napoleon, we have only resuscitated the spirit of insubordination which existed before he attained eminence, and though we have captured the French artillery, their mines have exploded; while the vain nation has achieved the moral conquest of influencing the opinions of the people of all countries, and of rousing a physical action utterly invincible. It would be premature to hazard a prognostication concerning events, which have made all Europe a volcano in eruption. Placing our trust in a superior Power, we wait the results.

Nor will we indulge in commonplace, concerning the tendency of a democratic spirit when in contention with aristocracy. We shall only

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