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meetings, and size of oak timber, allowed I would next move for " A copy of the reto be received into his inajesty's dock-port made by the purveyors of the navy, yards, on the established contracts since to the admiralty, on the 2d of Aug. 1802, 1776, and the lowest meetings, and size respecting the foreign timber which had of timber which is applicable to the building been served into Deptford yard, by Mr. of frigates and sloops of war.” This would John Larking." It was stated in the reshew the shameful prodigality which had port, that it was very inferior to English taken place in the employment of timber timber, some of the best of it approaching in the king's yards, where none was re- nearly in quality to the worst English oak, ceived but such as was applicable to the and that it could bear no competition construction of ships of the line, or 50-gun with it in point of durability.--His next ships. The consequence of this practice motion would be for a Copy of the conis, that frigates and sloops are built and re-tract or agreement which has been made paired with it ata most exorbitant expence,

since 15th May 1804, by the navy board, there being none received of the sizes adapt- with Mr. John Larking, for the importaed for the smaller classes of ships.--His tion of foreign oak timber; also an acnext would be for "An account shewing the count shewing any other allowance which quantity of sided timber converted in Dept- is to be made to him, on the said timber, ford-yard, in Oct. Nov. and Dec. 1804 ; than is therein expressed, and the sums of and in Oct. Nov. and Dec.1803, specifying money which have been advanced to him the number of trees which were found to be on account thereof."-His next for “ An sound, and the number which were found account shewing the number of shipwrights, to be defective in each month.' One and also of apprentices, employed in the balf of the trees in that yard, in 1801, were merchants' yards in G.Britain, according to rotten and defective. The salutary regu

the returns made to the admiralty in April lation of a timber-master took place about 1804." This would shew the number of shipthat period, and the consequence has been wrights to be about 5000, and the number of that the timber which has been received apprentices of all descriptions, to be about since that period has been good and ser-3700.- Next, for “ An account shewing viceable.- He would next move for “ An the amount of the tonnage of the merchant account shewing the sums of money which shipping of G. Britain, on the 1st Jan.1804, have been advanced as loans by the navy distinguishing the foreign from the Britishboard to Mr. John Larking, Mr. John built.” The tonnage, he understood to Bowsher, or any other timber merchants, be nearly two millions of tons.- Next for specifying the time when such loans were “ An account .shewing the numbers and made, and the conditions thereof." In tonnage of shipping which have been built consequence of those loans, those two in the merchants' yards of G. Britain, contractors had been enabled to drive all between the 1st Jan. 1793, and the 31st competitors out of the market.-His next Dec. 1804, or as late as the same can motion would be for “ An account shew- be made out, by the returns at the customing the price of timber in the king's yards, house." From this it would appear, that on the 18th of Feb. 1801, and the ad- in the merchant yards nearly 100,000 tons vances which have been since made there- per year, exclusive of the ships of war on on; the advantages given by the alteration contract, have been built.— Next for in the mode of measurement, and qualifi-“ An account, shewing the number of cations to be shewn in money.” “From ships and vessels of each class in the this it would appear that timber was ad- royal navy, and their tonnage; the foreignvanced 15 per cent. in 1802 ! and that a built ships to be distinctly stated, and further advance of nearly 40 per cent. took those which have been built in the merplace in June 1804. His next was for chant-yards from those which have been * Copies of the reports which have been built in the king's yards.” From this acmade to the navy board by the officers of count it would appear, that the whole the dock yards, on examining the Stetin navy amounts to about 530,000 tons; of timber which was used in his majesty's which about 114,000 tons have been taken ships some years since, by way of experi. from the enemy, and about 260,000 tons ment, to ascertain its durability.” These built by contract : only 156,000 tons have reports would shew that the timber is of been built in the king's yards, although such very inferior quality, that it is not they contain 3000 shipwrighis, besides worth the expence of workmanship.--- lle apprentices. He would next move for

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Copies of all letters and representations the time to be stated when other grounds
which have passed between the admiralty were made ; also, whether the grounds
and the navy boards, and between these were stated verbally or in writing, and by
boards, and the master shipwrights of his whom, if in writing. Copies thereof to
majesty's dock-yards, or any other person be laid before the house." "He understood
since the 27th Oct. 1803, on the subject that the merchant-builders complained
of shoaling the shipwrights." Repeated re- that they sustained considerable loss from
presentations had been made on the im- the ships which they built in 1800 for 211.
propriety of the system pursued iu working per ton, and that they were now held
the shipwrights in the king's yards, which strictly to the terms of their contract, and
the late admiralty had endeavoured to made responsible for any bad workmanship
correct.--He would also move for“ Copies that may be discovered at a future period.-
of all letters which have passed between Next for the “ Copy of a letter from the
the navy board and the master shipwrights Navy Board to the Admiralty, dated the
of the several dock-yards, since the 1st 24th Nov. 1802, inclosing the offer made
of June 1804, respecting the time when by Mr. Brindley to build a 74-gun ship
the ships ordered to be built in his majesty's and a frigate." This gentleman, he was
yards can be completed.” This would shew, informed, offered to build, a 74 at 211,
that if the men were properly shoaled, and per ton, two years after the time the other
not detained, by the want of materials, builders say they suffered such loss. His
there would be no occasion to employ the two next motions would be • For a sche-
merchant builders.His next motion dule of the prices for workmanship and
would be for“ a statement shiewing the materials, which the Navy Board has
number of shipwrights that should build a agreed to pay the merchant-builders for
74-gun ship of 1730 tons in one year, to ships ordered to be repaired by them since
be entitled, according to the prices for the 1st of June 1804, and against each
workmanship allowed by the present scheme article to be stated the sum which it costs
of task, to three days pay for one, or 6s. 3d. the public in Deptford-yard ;” also,
per diem.” At the rate of 6s. 3d. per day, statement to be made by the officers of
the present wages, 48 shipwrights should Deptford-yard, shewing for what price per
build a 74-gun ship, of 1730 tons, in one ton a ship of 74 guns and 1730 tons, could
year, or 312 days; and the whole sum for be built in that yard, in Jan. 1800 and
workmanship would amount to 46711.-1805; according to the scheme of task for
His two next would be for“ A list of workmanship, and the prices paid in that
ships which have been launched from his yard for rough oak timber, and the other
majesty's dock-yards, between the 1st of necessary materials at the above-mention-
Jan. 1793,

and 31st of Dec. 1804.” ed periods.” The merchant-builders had Also, “ An account shewing the number of demanded, and are to be paid about 71 shipwrights borne in all the yards, on the per cent. more than the prices in Deptford 31st of Dec. of each year, from 1793 to yard, where a 74 could be built for about 1804 inclusive; the sums paid to them for 181. per ton in 1800, and about 241. per wages in each year, and the number of ton at the present moment.--The two ships of 74 guns, and 1730 tons, which the next were for “A statement, shewing the sums so paid in each year would pay for defective or improper workmanslrip and the workmanship in building, according materials, which have appeared in his to the prices allowed by the present scheme n.ajesty's ships Ajax and Achilles. Also, of task.” In the 9 years prior to 1802, only the amount of the several repairs which 11 ships of the ļine, 2 fifties, 14 frigates, have been done to them, or of the esti, and 4 sloops had been launched in mate for repairing the latter; the time the king's yards, and money has been when they were launched, commissioned, actually paid equal to the building of and paid off, prior to Aug. 1802, to be 523 sail of the line.-His next would be stated. Also “ A copy of the letter sent

For a statement of the grounds upon to the admiralty, by the captain of his which the merchant ship-builders declined majesty's ship Ardent, dated 28th March to contract with the Navy Board for the 1804, on the subject of the iron bolts Building of ships of 74 guns, at a lower which had worked out of that ship.” The price than 361. per ton, such parts therc- Ajax and Achilles were only 4 years in of to be distinctly stated as were adduced commission, and they have, each since at the time tl:ey made their first offer, and cost from 12 to 20,0001, in repairs.-lle

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should next move for “ An account of the should be referred to a committee of their Additional Naval Force ordered to be lordships. Whatever the decision of the provided between the 15th and 30th of house should be, respecting the motions May 1804; together with an estimate of which he had read, he should not regret the expence thereof; the number of that he had brought the subject under guns and men each ship was to carry, to discussion. If he were wrong in the asbe distinctly stated.” Also, “ Copies of sertions he had made, the noble lord to all letters or representations which have whom they applied would have an oppor. been made by adiniral lord Keith, or the tunity of refuting them, and their lordships transport board, to the admiralty, respect- would be able to deterinine the points at ing the inefficiency of the Additional Naval issue between them. Although he thought Force, called defence ships, and armed the papers he should move for, necessary transports, and a statement shewing how for the full understanding of the question, they have since been disposed of.” Also, if they should be refused, he would still " A siatement of the force, under the persevere in his original intention, and command of admiral lord Keith, on the bring the whole of the subject, at a conveni15th of May 1804, and the 20th of March ent opportunity, under discussion. He would 1805." The defence ships had been re- not trouble their lordships with any

farther presented as being of no use, but rather observations, but make the first motion.au incumbrance, and they had all been The motion having been read from the ordered to be employed as transports. Lord woolsack, Keith’s force had been reduced nine sail Lord Melville rose, and assured the of the line and several frigates, and 9 noble lord, that nothing could be more sloops and 21 gun-brigs had been added.- adverse to his wishes, than to oppose the He would move for A list of the gun- production of any papers, which could brigs which were ordered to be fitted as possibly tend to impede the discussion of fire vessels, in June, July, and Aug. the important subject, which it was the 1804, specifying their force, and when professed object of all his motions to bring they were launched, when they were or- before their lordships. If the noble lord dered to be fitted as fire vessels, and when could prove his proposition, it would afthey were returned to the service of gun- ford him, and the whole kingdom, he was brigs.” Notwithstanding the clamours that persuaded, greater satisfaction than any had been raised against the late admiralty event which had ever occurred in the hisfor not having provided a sufficient num- tory of the naval administration of this ber of guo-brigs, immediately after the country. If he could prove that the king's present board came into office, nine of the yards, in times of difficulty, were equal to best were ordered to be fitted as fire-ships the keeping in repair of the great naval for some expedition which was not carried establishment of this country, and to add into effect. His last two motions would ten sail of the line to it annually, he who be for “ A list of ships and vessels ordered made the discovery would deserve to be to be built in the king's yards, and con- considered as the greatest benefactor to tracted for in the merchant's yards, from the country that has ever existed. He Jan. 1771, to the present time; the price would be among the foremost to express per ton, after all abatements have been bis gratitude to such a man. He thought made, to be stated against each ship built it necessary to remind the house that the by contract." Also“ Copies of the repre-motion respecting the late and present sentations made to the navy board by the naval administration, was not of his seeking, officers of Woolwich yard, after having He acted upon the defensive, and the difsurveyed the Hope merchant ship, now ferent papers which he had moved for, called the Hyæna; also a copy of the order were intended to be employed rather in to the officers of the yard to value her his own vindication, than for the purpose previous to her being purchased.” He of criminating others.

With regard to would take up no more of their lordships' one of the principal charges against him, time than to mention how he would pro- that of building in the merchant yards, he pose to proceed, if the papers he moved would assert, that, from the foundation for should be granted. It was his intention, of the navy, to the present time, no board ai some future day, to move that all the of admiralty ever existed in this country, information wbich had been laid on the with the exception of the last, which in times table respecting that important subject, of difficulty bad not recourse to building in

the

“ Copies of all letters and representations the time to be stated when other grounds which have passed between the admiralty were made ; also, whether the grounds and the navy boards, and between these were stated verbally or in writing, and by boards, and the master shipwrights of his whom, if in writing. Copies thereof to majesty's dock-yards, or any other person be laid before the house." He understood since the 27th Oct. 1803, on the subject that the merchant-builders complained of shoaling the shipwrights." Repeated re- that they sustained considerable loss from presentations had been made on the im- the ships which they built in 1800 for 211. propriety of the system pursued in working per ton, and that they were now held the shipwrights in the king's yards, which strictly to the terms of their contract, and the late admiralty had endeavoured to made responsible for any bad workmanship correct. --He would also move for“ Copies that may be discovered at a future period.of all letters which have passed between Next for the “Copy of a letter from the

navy board and the master shipwrights Navy Board to the Admiralty, dated the of the several dock-yards, since the 1st 24th Nov. 1802, inclosing the offer made of June 1804, respecting the time when by Mr. Brindley to build a 74-gun ship the ships ordered to be built in his majesty's and a frigate." This gentleman, he was yards can be completed.” This would shew, informed, offered to build, a 74 at 211. that if the men were properly shoaled, and per ton, two years after the time the other not detained, by the want of materials, builders say they suffered such loss. His there would be no occasion to employ the two next motions would be 66 For a schemerchant builders.His next motion dule of the prices for workmanship and would be for “ A statement shiewing the materials, which the Navy Board has number of shipwrights that should build. agreed to pay the merchant-builders for 74-gun ship of 1730 tons in one year, to ships ordered to be repaired by them since be entitled, according to the prices for the 1st of June 1804, and against each workmanship allowed by the present scheme article to be stated the sum which it costs of task, to three days pay for one, or 6s. 3d. the public in Deptford-yard ;" also, “A per diem.” At the rate of 6s. 3d. per day, statement to be made by the officers of the present wages, 48 shipwrights should Deptford-yard, shewing for what price per build a 74-gun ship, of 1730 tons, in one ton a ship of 74 guns and 1730 tons, could year, or 312 days; and the whole sum for be built in that yard, in Jan. 1800 and workmanship would aniount to 46711.- 1805; according to the scheme of task for His two next would be for“ A list of workmanship, and the prices paid in that ships which have been launched from his yard for rough oak timber, and the other majesty's dock-yards, between the 1st of necessary materials at the above-mentionJan. 1793, and 31st of Dec. 1804.” ed periods.” The merchant-builders had Also, “ An account shewing the number of demanded, and are to be paid about 71 shipwrights borne in all the yards, on the per cent. more than the prices in Deptford 31st of Dec. of each year, from 1793 to yard, where a 74 could be built for about 1804 inclusive; the sums paid to them for 181. per ton in 1800, and about 241. per wages in each year, and the number of ton at the present moment.--The two ships of 74 guns, and 1730 tons, which the next were for “A statement, shewing the sums so paid in each year would pay for defective or improper workmanslip and the workinanship in building, according materials, which have appeared in his to the prices allowed by the present scheme ndajesty's ships Ajax and Achilles. Also, of task.” In the 9 years prior to 1802, only the amount of the several repairs which 11 ships of the line, 2 fifties, 14 frigates, have been done to them, or of the estiand 4 sloops had been launched in mate for repairing the latter; the time the king's yards, ayd money has been when they were lauuched, commissioneda actually paid equal to the building of and paid off, prior to Aug. 1802, to be 523 sail of the line.- His next would be stated." Also “ A copy of the letter sent " For a statement of the grounds upon to the admiralty, by the captain of his which the merchant ship-builders declined majesty's ship Ardent, dated 28th March to contract with the Navy Board for the 1804, on the subject of the iron bolts building of ships of 74 guns, at a lower which had worked out of that ship.” The price than 361. per ton, such parts therc-Ajax and Achilles were only 4 years in of to be distinctly stated as were adduced commission, and they have, each since at the time tl:ey made their first offer, and cost from 12 to 20,0001, in repairs.--He

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1805.-State of the Naty. (150 meetings, and size of oak timber, allowed would next move for " A copy of the reto be received into his inajesty's dock- port made by the purveyors of the navy) yards, on the established contracts since to the admiralty, on the 2d of Aug. 1802, 1776, and the lowest meetings, and size respecting the foreign timber which had of timber which is applicable to the building been served into Deptford yard, by Mr. of frigates and sloops of war.” This would John Larking.". It was stated in the reshew the shameful prodigality which had port, that it was very inferior to English taken place in the employment of timber timber, some of the best of it approaching in the king's yards, where none was re- nearly in quality to the worst English oak, ceived but such as was applicable to the and that it could bear no competition construction of ships of the line, or 50-gun with it in point of durability. His next ships. The consequence of this practice motion would be for a “Copy of the conis, that frigates and sloops are built and re-tract or agreement which has been made paired with it at a most exorbitant expence, since 15th May 1804, by the navy board; there being none received of the sizes adapt- with Mr. John Larking, for the importaed for the smaller classes of ships. His tion of foreign oak timber; also an acnext would be for "An accountshewing the

count shewing any other allowance which quantity of sided timber converted in Dept-is to be made to him, on the said timber, ford-yard, in Oct. Nov. and Dec. 1804 ; than is therein expressed, and the sums of and in Oct. Nov. and Dec.1803, specifying money which have been advanced to him the number of trees which were found to be on account thereof."--His next for - An sound, and the number which were found account shewing the number of shipwrights, to be defective in each month." One and also of apprentices, employed in the balf of the trees in that yard, in 1801, were merchants' yards in G.Britain, according to fötten and defective. The salutary regu- the returns made to the admiralty in April lation of a timber-master took place about 1804.” This would shew the number of shipthat period, and the consequence has been wrights to be about 5000, and the number of that the timber which has been received apprentices of all descriptions, to be about nace that period has been good and ser- 3700..Next, for “ An account shewing riceable.He would next move for “ An the amount of the tonnage of the merchant account shewing the sums of money which shipping of G. Britain, on the 1st Jan.1804, have been advanced as loans by the navy distinguishing the foreign from the British board to Mr. John Larking, "Mr. John built.” The tonnage, he understood to

or any other timber merchants, be nearly two millions of tons.—Next for specifying the time when such loans were “ An account shewing the numbers and made, and the conditions thereof." In tonnage of shipping which have been built consequence of those loans, those two in the merchants yards of G. Britain, contractors had been enabled to drive all between the 1st Jan. 1793, and the 31st competitors out of the market.--His next Dec. 1804, or as late as the same can mation would be for “ An account shew- be made out, by the returns at the customing the price of timber in the king's yards, house." From this it would appear, that on the 18th of Feb. 1801, and the ad- in the merchant yards nearly 100,000 tons vances which have been since made there-per year, exclusive of the ships of war on on; the advantages given by the alteration contract, have been built.- Next for in the mode of measurement, and qualifi- “ An account, shewing the number of cations to be shewn in money." From ships and vessels of each class in the this it would appear that timber was ad- royal navy, and their tonnage; the foreignfanced 15 per cent. in 1802 ! and that a built ships to be distinctly stated, and further advance of nearly 40 per cent. took those which have been built in the merplace in June 1804. His next was for chant-yards from those which have been

Copies of the reports which have been built in the king's yards.” From this ac's made to the navy board by the officers of count it would appear, that the whole the dock yards," on examining the Stetin navy amounts to about 530,000 tonis; of timber which was used in his majesty's which about 114,000 tons have been taken ships some years since, by way of experi- from the enemy, and about 260,000 tons ment, to ascertain its durability." These built by contract : only 156,000 tons have reports would shew that the timber is of been built in the king's yards, although such very inferior quality, that it is not they contain 3000 shipwrights, besides worth the expence of workmanship.--lle apprentices. He would next move for

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