The Journal of speculative philosophy: Ed. by Wm. T. Harris. microform, Volumen6

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[etc.] D. Appleton, 1872

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Página 244 - How that might change his nature, there's the question. It is the bright day that brings forth the adder; And that craves wary walking. Crown him? — That; — And then, I grant, we put a sting in him, That at his will he may do danger with.
Página 134 - It blesseth him that gives, and him that takes : 'Tis mightiest in the mightiest ; it becomes The throned monarch better than his crown. His sceptre shows the force of temporal power, The attribute to awe and majesty, Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings ; But mercy is above this sceptred sway : It is enthroned in the hearts of kings, It is an attribute to God himself, And earthly power doth then show likest God's, When mercy seasons justice.
Página 245 - tis a common proof That lowliness is young ambition's ladder, Whereto the climber.upward turns his face; But when he once attains the upmost round, He then unto the ladder turns his back, Looks in the clouds, scorning the base degrees By which he did ascend. So Caesar may. Then lest he may, prevent.
Página 244 - It must be by his death : and, for my part, I know no personal cause to spurn at him, But for the general. He would be crown'd : — How that might change his nature, there's the question : It is the bright day that brings forth the adder ; And that craves wary walking.
Página 318 - It can therefore be said that this content is the exposition of God as he is in his eternal essence before the creation of nature and a finite mind.
Página 135 - That, in the course of justice, none of us Should see salvation: we do pray for mercy; And that same prayer doth teach us all to render The deeds of mercy.
Página 249 - This was the noblest Roman of them all; All the conspirators save only he Did that they did in envy of great Caesar; He only, in a general honest thought, And common good to all, made one of them. His life was gentle, and the elements So mix'd in him that Nature might stand up And say to all the world, 'This was a man!
Página 247 - Here comes his body, mourned by Mark Antony: who, though he had no hand in his death , shall receive the benefit of his dying, a place in the commonwealth ; As which of you shall not ? With this I depart ; That, as I slew my bes't lover" for the good of Rome, I have the same dagger for myself, when it shall please my country to need my death.
Página 243 - My country — may she ever be right; but, right or wrong, my country.
Página 286 - We have no knowledge of anything but phenomena ; (and our knowledge of phenomena is relative not absolute.) We know not the essence nor the real mode of production of any fact, but only its relations to other facts in the way of succession, or of similitude. These relations are constant, that is, always the same in the same circumstances. The constant resemblances which link phenomena together and the constant sequences which unite them as antecedent and consequent, are termed their laws. The laws...

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