The Tragedie of Anthonie, and Cleopatra

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Lippincott, 1907 - 614 páginas
Presents the romantic tragedy about the relationship between Mark Antony and the Queen of Egypt.

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Página 347 - My bounty is as boundless as the sea, My love as deep; the more I give to thee, The more I have, for both are infinite.
Página 180 - His life was gentle, and the elements So mix'd in him that Nature might stand up And say to all the world, 'This was a man!
Página 29 - And he sent them to Bethlehem, and said, Go, and search diligently for the young child, and when ye have found him, bring me word again, that I may come and worship him also.
Página 296 - Nay, do not think I flatter ; For what advancement may I hope from thee, That no revenue hast but thy good spirits, To feed and clothe thee ? Why should the poor be flatter'd ? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee Where thrift may follow fawning.
Página xvii - His legs bestrid the ocean : his rear'd arm Crested the world : his voice was propertied As all the tuned spheres, and that to friends ; But when he meant to quail and shake the orb, He was as rattling thunder. For his bounty, There...
Página 487 - O, wither'd is the garland of the war, The soldier's pole is fall'n : young boys and girls Are level now with men ; the odds is gone, And there is nothing left remarkable Beneath the visiting moon.
Página 119 - I sent thee late a rosy wreath, Not so much honouring thee As giving it a hope that there It could not withered be; But thou thereon didst only breathe And sent'st it back to me; Since when it grows, and smells, I swear, Not of itself but thee!
Página 309 - As an unperfect actor on the stage Who with his fear is put besides his part, Or some fierce thing replete with too much rage, Whose strength's abundance weakens his own heart...
Página 580 - Egypt, thou knew'st too well My heart was to thy rudder tied by the strings, And thou should'st tow me after ; o'er my spirit Thy full supremacy thou knew'st, and that Thy beck might from the bidding of the gods Command me. Cleo. O ! my pardon. Ant. Now I must To the young man send humble treaties, dodge And palter in the shifts of lowness, who With half the bulk o...
Página 137 - HIGH on a throne of royal state, which far Outshone the wealth of Ormus and of Ind, Or where the gorgeous East with richest hand Showers on her kings barbaric pearl and gold...

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