Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

THE

OBERLIN

QUARTERLY REVIEW,

EDITED BY

Prest. A MAHAN, and Prot. E.: G FINNEY,

August, 184 7.

OBERLIN, O.,
JAMES M: FITCH.

1847.

PUBLIC LIBRARY 140878

ASTOR LENOX AND TILDEN FOUNDATIOS.

1500

OF

ARTICLE LI.

*THE DOOTRINE OF IMPERFECTION."

Examination of two important points in the work reviewed, 1–5. The

real question at issue determined-Argument attributed to the defenders of

the doctrine of sanctification, 5-15. Examination of the arguments of the,

author reviewed, 15_22.

ARTICLE LII.

AN EXAMINATION OF THE REVIEW OF FINNEYS THEOLOGY.

Miscellaneous observations, 23–24. Explanations, 24-29. Points of agree-
ment, 29–33. A point of difference-What is physical Inability ? 33–37. Ex-
amination of our authors disposal of the doctrine that obligation is limited by
ability, 37-41. In what sense the doctrine that the end sanctifies the means
is true, 41, and where false, 42-44. Our author's disposal of the doctrine
that enjoyment is the ultimate good of being, 44–47. Examination of our
author's objections to the doctrine that happiness is the ultimate good of be-
ing, 47–72. Summary, 72–73. Misrepresentations noticed, 73–8ì.

ARTICLE LIIL

SIMPLICITY OF MORAL ACTION.

Recapitulation, 82-84. When is an intention right? when wrong?=how

shall its character be determined ? 84–87.. , he end which weåre required to

will as ultimate the same for all moral agorts, 87–92. Consequences which

flow from the position established, 92–106.

ARTICLE LIV-

CHARLOTTE ELIZABETH.

Result of the love of God shed abroad in the heart, 207. - Intellectual en-

dowments ef Charlotte Elizabeth, 109-112. Her practical aiga, 1,2. Dig.

nity of her style, 112. Clearness of her thoughts, 113–114. Charlotte

Elizabeth a woman of great feeling, 114-115. Her tendency to one-ideaism,

116–119. Her fervent and mature piety, 119–120.

ARTICLE LV.

THE CONFESSION OF FAITH OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH : 121-130.

ARTICLE LVI.

THE CONFESEION OF FAITH OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.

New School distinction between Atonement and Redemption, 131-134.

Self-consistency of the Confession of Faith, 135—142. Relation of the New

School to the Confession of Faith, 142–147. Attitude in which Theological

Discussions have placed New School Men, 147—150.

ARTICLE LVII.

THE LAW OF RIGHT.

The Law of Right an intuitive moral judgment, 151–161. Important sug-

gestions, 161-164.

ARTICLE LVIII.

· ROMANS VII: 14,25, NOT CHRISTIAN EXPERIENCE.-165–196.

ARTICLE LIX.

SIMPLICITY OF NORAL ACTION.

Preliminary Remarks, 197—198. By a law of absolute necessity, what-

ever of moral energy the will at any time possesses, passes into its ultimate

intention, 198—208. Examination of arguments, 208–216. Observations,

216-218.

ARTICLE LX.

REFLECTIONS ON NATIONAL LITERATURE APPLIED TO THAT OF ENGLAND.-219-227.

ARTICLE LXI.

LIBERTY AND LABOR.

Introductory Observations, 228-232. Liberty and Labor have a joint mis-

sion, 232–234. Relations of Liberty to Labor-Labor dependent on Liberty,

234-242. Labor ought to be wedded to Liberty, 242—247. Results of such

a union, 247–252.

NOTICES OF NEW WORKS.

ARTICLE LXII.

SIMPLICITY OF MORAL ACTION :-255-285.

ARTICLE LXIII.

LIGHT AND LOVE:

Light and the relation it sustains to Love, 285–301. What further light

is to be predicated of all true Christians, 301-306. Sundry propositions

examined in their order, 306-310.

ARTICLE. LXIV.

SOLOMON'S SONG.

The Book variously interpreted, 311. Solomon the Author, 311. The

daughter of Pharaoh, the bride, 311-312. Objections to the view that the

book illustrates the mutual love of Christ and his church, 312-316. The de-

sign of the book, 316–320.

ARTICLE LXV.

PIETY AND PHILANTHROPY.

In all earth-born religions, and in all corruptions of the true religion, Piety

and Philanthropy are set forth as antagonisms, 321–333. In the Christian

religion these principles have been harmonized and conjoined as the two es-

sential elements of one system, 333–349.

ARTICLE LXVI.

History OF THE DOCTRINE OF ORIGINAL SIN :-250-261.

ARTICLE LXVII.

SANCTIFICATION ; Essie xvwi PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL Essays :

Argumentům ad invidiam, *262-263. Testimony of the Fathers, 264–365.

Imputeď arguments,.miş-statements and replies, 366–370

SELECT PASSAGES OF SORPTURE CONSIDERED :

Genesis 6": 14, pågės“ 371-472.

ARTICLE LXVIII.

REPLY TO THE WARNING AGAINST ERROR.

Peculiarities of the Warning, 373—376. First issue: foundation of faith,

376 377. Second issue: foundation of moral obligation, 377–386. Third

issue: nature and authority of moral law, 386–389. Fourth issue: nature

of obedience to moral law, 389–395. Fifth issue: Spirituality and extent of

moral law, 395—397-399. Seventh issue: nature and ground of justifica-

tion, 399_-402. Eighth issue: immutability of justification, perseverance

unto life, 402-406. Ninth issue: sanctification, 406—412. Tenth issue:

nature of depravity, 412—418.

ARTICLE LXIX.

COME-OUTISM AND COME-OUTERS.

The duty of Come-outism as ascertained in the light of New Testament

church order, 419–430. How do the churches of this country compare with

that essential law ? 430—449.

ARTICLE LXX.

EXPOSITION OF HOSEA IV: XVII:-450-455.

ARTICLE LXXI.

SKETCH OF THE LIFE Rev. Wm. COCHRAN, 456–472.

ARTICLE LXXII.

PRINCIPLES OF CHURCH DISCIPLINE, 474–487.

ARTICLE LXXIII.

IDEA OF RETRIBUTION :-488-500.

THE

OBERLIN QUARTERLY REVIEW.

VOLUME III....No I.

AUGUST, 1847.

ARTICLE LI.

“The Doctrine of Imperfection."

Lectures on the moral imperfection of Christians; designed

to show, that while sinless perfection is obligatory on all, it is attained by none: By Seth Williston, author of the Harmony of Divine Truth; a Vindication of the Doctrines of the Reformation, etc. New York, M. W. Dodd, 1846, pp 262.

By PRES. A. MAHAN.

The work above named is very highly commended by the advocates of the doctrine which it professes to elucidate and confirm. We do not review it, because that therein are found any new and important arguments against the doctrine it professes to overthrow, or in favor of that which it intends to establish. We have in view another and different end, an end which the reader will not fail to apprehend, as he progresses through the present article. Two paragraphs which we meet with in the preface demand special attention before we advance into the interior of the work itself. The first sets forth the intention of the author, in the publication of these Lectures. In the proclamation, either through the tongue or pen, of any particular doctrine, an individual always has in view some particular end, and that end, if intelligently pursued, can in no case be higher than the doctrine proclaimed as a means to that end, is intrinsically adapted to secure. No intelligent man, for example, would ever undertake to demonstrate the fact, that no individual ever did or ever will raise a certain weight, and aim to produce that conviction as a means

« AnteriorContinuar »