Child-pictures from Dickens

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Ticknor and Fields, 1867 - 241 páginas
 

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Página 149 - So Martha hid herself, and in came little Bob, the father, with at least three feet of comforter exclusive of the fringe, hanging down before him; and his threadbare clothes darned up and brushed, to look seasonable; and Tiny Tim upon his shoulder. Alas for Tiny Tim, he bore a little crutch, and had his limbs supported by an iron frame! "Why, where's our Martha?" cried Bob Cratchit, looking round. "Not coming,
Página 152 - Suppose it should not be done enough! Suppose it should break in turning out! Suppose somebody should have got over the wall of the...
Página 153 - ... blushed to hint at such a thing. At last the dinner was all done, the cloth was cleared, the hearth swept, and the fire made up. The compound in the jug being tasted and considered perfect, apples and oranges were put upon the table, and a shovel-full of chestnuts on the fire.
Página 20 - She was dead. No sleep so beautiful and calm, so free from trace of pain, so fair to look upon. She seemed a creature fresh from the hand of God, and waiting for the breath of life ; not one who had lived and suffered death. "Her couch was dressed with here and there some winter berries and green leaves, gathered in a spot she had been used to favor. ' When I die, put near me something that has loved the light, and had the sky above it always.
Página 20 - And now the bell — the bell she had so often heard by night and day, and listened to with solemn pleasure, almost as a living voice — rung its remorseless toll for her, so young, so beautiful, so good. Decrepit age, and vigorous life, and blooming youth, and helpless infancy, poured forth — on crutches, in the pride of health and strength, in the full blush of promise, in the mere dawn of life — to gather round her tomb.
Página 142 - The door of Scrooge's counting-house was open, that he might keep his eye upon his clerk, who, in a dismal little cell beyond, a sort of tank, was copying letters. Scrooge had a very small fire, but the clerk's fire was so very much smaller that it looked like one coal. But he...
Página 90 - and Floy, come close to me, and let me see you ! " Sister and brother wound their arms around each other, and the golden light came streaming in, and fell upon them, locked together. " How fast the river runs, between its green banks and the rushes, Floy ! But it's very near the sea. I hear the waves ! They always said so f " Presently he told her that the motion of the boat upon the stream was lulling him to rest.
Página 152 - Oh, a wonderful pudding ! Bob Cratchit said, and calmly too, that he regarded it as the greatest success achieved by Mrs. Cratchit since their marriage.
Página 144 - ... that — as a good time: a kind, forgiving, charitable, pleasant time: the only time I know of, in the long calendar of the year, when men and women seem by one consent to open their...
Página 148 - There's such a goose, Martha !" "Why, bless your heart alive, my dear, how late you are!" said Mrs. Cratchit, kissing her a dozen times, and taking off her shawl and bonnet for her with officious zeal. "We'da deal of work to finish up last night," replied the girl, "and had to clear away this morning, mother!

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