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The Spaniards gazed at him with astonishment. From his language he was evidently a Castilian, but to all appearance he was an Indian. He was perfectly naked; wore his hair braided round his head in the manner of the country, and his complexion was burnt by the sun to a tawny color. He had a bow in his hand, a quiver at his shoulder, and a network pouch at his side, in which he carried his provisions.

The Spaniards proved to be a reconnoitring party sent out by Cortez to watch the approach of the canoe, which had been descried coming from Yucatan. Cortez had given up all hopes of being joined by the captives, the caravel having waited the allotted time at Cotoche, and returned without news of them. He had in fact made sail to prosecute his voyage, but fortunately one of his ships sprung a leak, which obliged him to return to the island.

When Geronimo de Aguilar and his companions arrived in the presence of Cortez, who was surrounded by his officers, they made a profound reverence, squatted on the ground, laid their bows and arrows beside them, and touching their right hands wet with spittle on the ground, rubbed them about the region of the heart, such being their sign of the most devoted submission.

Cortez gree:ei Ag::..az with a hearty welcome, azi rais::g hi: fro: the earth, took for his ow: ;---to a large yellow mantle l:::ed with cri: - ... a. i to::ew it over his shoulders. The later however had for a long ::::e go:e e:::::ely :akei, that even this scanty coveri: ; was at first al:ost insupportable, and he had beco:e so ascusto:led to the diet of the natives, that he for:d it difficult to reconcile his stomach to the reat a:d drink set before him. When he had sufficiently recovered from the agitation of his arrival among Christians, Cortez drew from hi: the particulars of his story, and found that he was related to one of his own friends, the Licentiate Marcos de Aguilar. He treated him therefore with additional kindness and respect, and retained him about his person, to aid him as an interpreter in his great Mexican expedition. The happiness of Geronimo de Aguilar at once more being restored to his countrymen was doomed to suffer some alloy from the disasters that had happened in his family. Peter Martyr records a touching anecdote of the effect produced upon his mother by the tidings of his misfortune. A vague report reached her in Spain, that her son had fallen into the hands of cannibals. All the horrible tales concerning the treatment of these savages to their prisoners rushed to her imagination, and she went distracted. Whenever she beheld roasted meat, or flesh, upon the spit, she would fill the house with her outcries. “Oh, wretched mother 1 oh, most miserable of women l’’ would she exclaim ; “behold the limbs of my murdered son 1’’ It is to be hoped that the tidings of his deliverance had a favorable effect upon her intellects, and that she lived to rejoice at his after fortunes. He served Hernando Cortez with great courage and ability throughout his Mexican conquests, acting sometimes as a soldier, sometimes as interpreter and ambassador to the Indians, and in reward of his fidelity and services was appointed regidor, or civil governor of the city of Mexico.

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MICER CODRO, THE ASTROLOGER

Codro, who predicted the end of Vasco Nuñez, is related by the historian Oviedo with some particulars that border upon the marvellous. It appears that after the death of his patron he continued for several years rambling about the New World, in the train of the Spanish discoverers; but intent upon studying the secrets of its natural history rather than searching after its treasures. In the course of his wanderings he was once coasting the shores of the Southern Ocean, in a ship commanded by one Geronimo de Valenzuela, from whom he received such cruel treatment as to cause his death, though what the nature of the treatment was, we are not precisely informed. Finding his end approaching, the unfortunate astrologer addressed Valenzuela in the most solemn manner : “Captain,” said he, 62

To fate of the Italian astrologer, Micer

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