The Irish Dominicans of the Seventeenth Century: First Published at Louvain in 1706. Reprinted with an English Translation, and an Appendix Containing ... Ancient Dominican Foundations in Ireland

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W. Tempest, 1902 - 288 páginas
 

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Página 40 - Dublin, he informed he lords -justices of the prisoner he had brought with him, and of the good testimony he had received of his peaceable carriage, and of the pains he had taken to restrain those with whom he had credit from entering into rebellion, and of many charitable offices he had performed, of all...
Página xviii - Children and servants are wholly taught and catechised by them . . . they withdraw many from the Church that formerly had conformed themselves ; and others, of whom good hope had been conceived, they have made altogether obstinate, disobedient and contemptuous.
Página xviii - ... refuse to take the Oath of Supremacy, as is requisite by the statute. . . . The people in many places resort to Mass now in greater multitudes, both in town and country, than for many years past, and if it chance that any priest known to be factious and working be apprehended, both men and women wOl not stick to rescue the party.
Página 40 - When his lordship came to Dublin, he informed the lords justices of the prisoner he had brought with him, and of the good testimony he had received of his peaceable carriage, and of the pains he had taken to restrain those with whom he had credit, from entering into rebellion, and of many charitable offices he had performed : of...
Página 15 - ... and established themselves in Moneyscalp, where they erected a cabin, the site of which is to this day shown in the garden of Mrs. Mullan, and the people still point out with veneration the stone that was their door-step, and another stone that served them for an altar when their congregation became too large to find accommodation within their humble dwelling. Here they were visited in 1751 by Dr. Thomas de Burgo, who, in his " Hibernia Dominicana," says : — " The members of this convent in...
Página 40 - Ormond, he voluntarily confessed that he was a papist, and that his residence was in the town, from whence he refused to fly away, with those that were guilty, because he not only knew himself very innocent, but believed that he could not be without ample testimony of it; having by his sole charity and power, preserved very many of the English from the rage and fury of the Irish; and therefore he only besought his lordship...
Página 40 - Dublin, he informed the lords justices of the prisoner he had brought with him, and of the good testimony he had received of his peaceable carriage, and of the pains he had taken to restrain those with whom he had credit, from entering into rebellion, and of many charitable offices he had performed : of all which there wanted not evidence enough, there being many then in Dublin, who owed their lives and whatever of their fortunes was left, purely to him.
Página 40 - Kildare the soldiers found a priest, -one Mr. Higgins, at Naas, who might, if he pleased, have easily fled if he apprehended any danger in the stay. When he was brought before the Earl of Ormond, he voluntarily confessed that he was a papist, and that his residence was in the town, from whence he refused to fly away with those that were...
Página 48 - Holiday, because time served not to stay for the searching of it out, we left commission with the Bishop, the mayor and other discreet persons, to enquire and search for the same, who within two days after our departure laboured so diligently, though it were carefully shifted out of the way, as they found it and burnt it...
Página 46 - ... from his own cathedral on the rock of Cashel. His name is celebrated in the works of many foreign and domestic writers. In 1245 he assisted at the first general council at Lyons, to the acts of which his name is subscribed. A charter, confirmed by assent of King Edward II., was granted in 1317, by Sir Roger de Mortimer and his council, in favour of the Dominican community, by which the ward, or custody, of the gate of the lately erected city walls, nearest to the abbey of St.

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