The British Drama: A Collection of the Most Esteemed Tragedies, Comedies, Operas, and Farces, in the English Language, Volumen1

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J.B. Lippincott, 1859

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Página 242 - Twere now to be most happy, for I fear My soul hath her content so absolute That not another comfort like to this Succeeds in unknown fate.
Página 179 - ... can Rolla's words add vigour to the virtuous energies which inspire your hearts ? No ! — You have judged as I have, the foulness of the crafty plea by which these bold invaders would delude you.
Página 404 - Oh, prayers will be said in empty churches at the usual hours. Yet you will see such zealous faces behind counters as if religion were to be sold in every shop.
Página 197 - I wonder you'd lose a thought upon such an animal; the most peremptory absurd clown of Christendom, this day, he is holden. I protest to you, as I am a gentleman and a soldier, I ne'er changed words with his like. By his discourse, he should eat nothing but hay : he was born for the manger, pannier, or pack-saddle. He has not so much as a good phrase in his belly, but all old iron, and rusty proverbs: a good commodity for some smith to make hobnails of.
Página 462 - There yet remain Three legions in the town. The last assault Lopt off the rest; if death be your design,— As I must wish it now— these are sufficient To make a heap about us of dead foes, An honest pile for burial. Ant. They're enough. We'll not divide our stars; but, side by side, Fight emulous, and with malicious eyes Survey each other's acts. So every death Thou giv'st, I'll take on me, as a just debt, And pay thee back a soul.
Página 388 - Ha, how? Faith and troth I'm glad of it; and so I have: that may be good luck in troth, in troth it may, very good luck. Nay, I have had some omens: I got out of bed backwards too this morning, without premeditation; pretty good that too; but then I stumbled coming down stairs, and met a weasel; bad omens those: some bad, some good, our lives are chequered.
Página 393 - I ask you, if you can love me, you must say no, but you must love me too. If I tell you you are handsome, you must deny it, and say I flatter you. But you must think yourself more charming than I speak you : and like me, for the beauty which I say you have, as much as if I had it myself. If I ask you to kiss me, you must be angry, but you must not refuse me. If I ask you for more, you must be more angry, — but more...
Página 455 - Tis true, I have a heart disdains your coldness, And prompts me not to seek what you should offer; But a wife's virtue still surmounts that pride. I come to claim you as my own; to show My duty first; to ask, nay beg, your kindness: Your hand, my lord; 'tis mine, and I will have it.
Página 464 - Already, death, I feel thee in my veins: I go with such a will to find my lord, That we shall quickly meet. A heavy numbness creeps through every limb, And now 'tis at my head; my eyelids fall, And my dear love is vanished in a mist. Where shall I find him, where? O turn me to him, And lay me on his breast !— Caesar, thy worst; Now part us, if thou canst.
Página 384 - Rail ? at whom ? the whole world ? Impotent and vain ! who would die a martyr to sense in a country where the religion is folly? you may stand at bay for a while; but when the full cry is against you, you shan't have fair play for your life. If you can't be fairly run down by the hounds, you will be treacherously shot by the huntsmen. No, turn pimp, flatterer, quack, lawyer, parson, be chaplain to an atheist, or stallion to an old woman...

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