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it, as to lowering the rate of wages ?—That are the necessaries of life that a weaver and is a subject I have paid considerable atten- his family use ?-1 have not the statement tion to ever since it was erected, I recollect with me just now, but my colleague is preperfectly well that when it was first intro- paring it. duced the weavers looked upon it as some- Do you ascribe your distress to what is thing foreboding their ruin; and I believe called the Corn Bill?_With respect to the to some degree, though I have no objection Corn Bill, there are many different opinions to improvements in machinery, it has already upon it; but as relates to us as weavers, we gone a length which is beyond what is rea- are persuaded that though the Corn Bill sonable; and certainly it produces a cheap- were off to-morrow, such is the nature of ness of cloth, though it is not directly that our manufactures and the disposition for which is produced by the hand-loom: it cheapness, that they would reduce us just has its effect in shedding its influence in exactly proportionably to the fall of corn. producing the cloth as produced by hand- Do you suppose that what is called Peel's looms, the very same way as a superabun- Bill has been instrumental in affecting either dance of oats in Scotland would reduce the your employment or your wages; do you value of wheat, which was a superior grain, know what is called Peel's Bill for reducing bringing it down below its natural level, the quantity of money ?-Yes, I have heard though there had not been a superabundance tell of Peel's Bill; what I understand by it of that article.

is this, that it has been a means of contractDo you consider that as the power-loom ing the currency. Now, under such cirwith one person can produce as much cloth cumstances as that, there is nothing more as three hand-looms with three persons, and clear than that it must be a general evil to that as there are taxes on the necessaries of the country. I shall illustrate this to you life, that it would be expedient either to just now. The higher the circulation of take off those taxes on the necessaries of money in this country is, so much the betlife, or to put a tax corresponding to the ter; for we stand on artificial ground in evasion of those taxes which the power- comparison with that of the rest of the loom enjoys, upon the power-loom itself ?- surrounding nations of Europe. This beI should conceive for my part that the comes necessary on account of the very taking the taxes off the necessaries of life great burthen of the national debt. If the would be a great benefit, upon the whole, to country has an artificial burthen to bear, it the community; but it would not thereby, becomes absolutely necessary that it should in a relative sense, better the weavers' con- have artificial means of support. If the dition, because it would also be taken off to circulation of the country (that is, the value other tradesmen; still we would be propor- of labour) be £200,000,000. yearly, and the tionably below them in our wages. What taxation £50,000,000., it is clear then that we have principally to complain of at the there is one fourth of it taxation, paid out of present moment is, that we have to pay this £200,000,000. We shall suppose then, dear for the productions of other workmen, by Peel's Bill, or any other measure, the while they again receive our productions currency is restricted to £100,000,000., cheap in return. Now to illustrate this, I being still the yearly value of labour. If we shall give, for example, the case of a shoe- pay still £50,000,000. of taxation, it makes maker: he has 20s. a week; he has 38. in the burthen double; and I might add, that consequence of his high wages, for making if the income all other classes, productive a pair of shoes; for we must pay for the and unproductive, were reduced proporworkmanship besides the leather, and the tionably as the weavers are, it would be pair of shoes will cost us, say 7s. Now if the impossible to pay the taxation, and a nashoemakers' wages were reduced to our tional bankruptcy would be the consestandard, it would take two thirds from his quence. (To be continued.) wages, and he would only have ls. for making a pair of shoes; consequently, with

A FABLE. out any alteration in the real value of the

THE WOOING OF MASTER FOX. article, we would have them all the odds of workmanship less, or 25. cheaper.

(Continued from our last.) Can you ascribe to any causes why you “The Dog was by no means pleased at should be in that particular state of distress meeting so suddenly a creature that had while other classes are not; do you ascribe only to open his mouth to swallow him up it to the power-loom or any other cause at a morsel; however he put a bold face on upon which you can give us information ?- the danger, and walking respectfully up to There may be other causes, but I would the Griffin, said, “ Sir, I should be very ascribe a considerable portion of it to the much obliged to you if you would inform power-loom, and the influence the cheapness me the way out of these holes in the upper of its production sheds on that of the hand- world." kon weavers.

The Griffin took the pipe out of his mouth, Can you show us any statement of what and looked at the Dog very sternly.

“ Hol wretch," said he,“ how comest the country? For instance: let the whole thou hither? I suppose thou wantest to of the expenditure for the relief of the poor steal my treasure; but I know how to treat throughout the kingdom, be apportioned such vagabonds as you, and I shall certainly similar to the land tax. Wherever the eat you up.”

charge of pauperism occurs, let the district "You can do that if you choose,” said provide for it according to the general rules the Dog, " but it would be very unhand- ordered by the Act of Parliament; and those some conduct in an animal so much bigger districts which might have expended more than myself. For my own part, I never than their equalized rate, should be repaid attack any dog that is not of equal size. I through receivers general appointed for each should be ashamed of myself if I did; and county, who should receive the poor levy as to your treasure, the character I bear for according to annual fixed rental, estimated honesty is too well known to merit such a every year from the rates of the assessed suspicion.”

taxes."—We shall be glad to hear further Upon my word," said the Griffin who from C. could not help smiling for the life of him, Mr. Rosser's able, but in some respects,

you have a singularly free mode of ex- visionary brochure, entitled “Credit Perpressing yourself;--and how, I say, came nicious,” together with some other works, you hither?”

shall be noticed as soon as the arrangements Then the Dog, who did not know what now in progress, for the purpose of reviewa lie was, told the Griffin his whole history, ing useful and moral publications, are comhow he had set off to pay his court to the pleted. Cat, and how Reynard the Fox had entrapped The excellent letter of a Gloucester Agri. him into the hole.

culturist, Mr. Birch's, and other favors, in When he had finished, the Griffin said to succeeding numbers. him, “ I see, my friend, that you know how The figures sent by Agricola shall be to speak the truth; I am in want of just examined. Some extracts from the speech such a servant as you will make me to of J. Maxwell, Esq. M.P., on moving for a keep watch over my treasure when I sleep.” committee on the Hand-loom Weavers, shall

"Two words to that,” said the Dog. be given in No. 3. “ You have hurt my feelings very much by suspecting my honesty, and I would much NOTICE TO CORRESPONDING sooner go back into the wood and be

MEMBERS. avenged on that scoundrel the Fox, than

The Agricultural Associations which have serve a master who has so ill an opinion of me; even if he gave me to keep, much less distress, are especially requested to take

sprung up so numerously in consequence of to take care of, all the treasures in the world. active steps to introduce the circulation of I pray you, therefore, to dismiss me, and to the Magazine in every market town and put me in the right way to my cousin the district; agriculture being admitted on all Cat.”—FROM THE PILGRIMS OF THE RHINE. hands to be the foundation of the great home (To be continued.)

trade, which is so miserably depressed.

With a view to this, the Corresponding COMMUNICATIONS RECEIVED. Members are requested to communicate The Secretary of the Committee for con

with the Agricultural Associations in their ducting the Agricultural and Industrial respective districts. Magazine, is directed to convey to C. the

It is also to be hoped that Corresponding thanks of the Committee for his letter re- Members will forward, at their earliest conspecting the burthen of the Poor Law venience, to the Secretary, any details or Assessment, more than one-sixth of which statistical facts relative to the agricultural, is not appropriated to the relief of the commercial, or maritime condition of the Poor. The following suggestion, offered by people. C., is given for the purpose of promoting

Annual subscriptions of £1., and donafurther

investigation into the practicability tions, to be paid to Local Committees, or of the plan proposed :—“The great burthen into the Bank of Matthias Attwood, Esq. of poor rates, as at present levied, is the

M.P. Gracechurch-street, London. Annual inequality of the rates in different towns subscribers of £1. are entitled to five copies and in different counties--some districts of each number for the year; and donors of paying, with all its improvident charges, as £5. £10. £15. £20. or £25., to five, ten, fiflow as three shillings in the pound an- teen, twenty, or twenty-five copies, accordnually on the valued rental—whilst many ing to the amount of donation. These other districts pay as much as eight shil. copies will be furnished to the subscribers lings in the pound, particularly in com

or donors on application to the Publishers, mercial and manufacturing districts. Now, who will forward them according to instrucwhy should not the expense of the main

tions. tenance of the poor be equalized throughout PRINTED BY W. NICOL, 51, PALL MALL.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small]

ENCOURAGEMENT OF DOMESTIC INDUSTRY, AND FOR PROMOTING EFFECTUAL RELIEF FROM

THE GENERAL DISTRESS.

1834.

LONDON:
JAMES COCHRANE AND CO.

11, WATERLOO PLACE, PALL MALL.

SOLD ALSO WHOLESALE BY
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The Fourth Number will be Published on the 1st of December.- Price 2d.

Printed by W. Nicol, Pall Mall.

COMMITTEE.

Chairman-E. S. CAYLEY, Esq., M.P. Yorkshire, N.R. Hon. D. G. Hallyburton, M.P. Forfarshire. George Finch, Esq., M.P. Stamford. Sir G. Cayley, Bart. M.P. Scarborough. Hesketh Fleetwood, Esq., M.P. Preston. Sir Hyde Parker, Bart. M.P. Suffolk. W. C. Harland, Esq., M.P. Durham. Sir R. B. W. Bulkeley, Bart. M.P. Anglesea H. Lambert, Esq., M.P. Wexfordshire. Sir C. Burrell, Bart. M.P. Rape of Bramber. E. C. Lister, Esq., M.P. Bradford. Sir Eardley Wilmot, Bt. M.P. Warwickshire. J. Maxwell, Esq., M.P. Lanarkshire. A. Chapman, Esq., M.P. Whitby.

R. A. Oswald, Esq., M.P. Ayrshire.
R. W. Hall Dare, Esq., M.P. Essex.

G. Sinclair, Esq., M.P. Caithness-shire.
L. W. Dillwyn, Esq., M.P. Glamorganshire. C. Tyrell, Esq., M.P. Suffolk.
John Fielden, Esq., M.P. Oldham.

G. F. Young, Esq., M.P. Tynemouth.
Honorary Secretary-R. MONTGOMERY MARTIN, Esq. F.S.S.,

11, Waterloo Place, Pall Mall, London.

CORRESPONDING MEMBERS.
Aylesbury-Henry T. Ryde, Esq. Linlithgowshire-W. D. Gillon, Esq.
Bakewell— Mr. James Taylor.

M.P
Belfast-J. E. Tennent, Esq. M. P. Macclesfield-Mr. Swinnerton.
BeverleyT. Sandwith, Esq.

Malton-W. Worsley, Esq.
Birmingham--G. F. Muntz, Esq. Manchester-W. Clegg, Esq.
Bolton-Mr. Thos. Myerscough. Northallerton-Right Hon. The Earl
Bury St. Edmund's-R. Dalton, Esq. of Tyrcopnel.
Carlisle, Mr. C. Thurnham. Nottingham-.Mr. John Crosby.
Cambridge Jas. B. Bernard, Esq. Oldham-Mr. W. Fitton.

King's College, Cambridge. Pocklington---Major-Gen. Sir H. M. Cowbridge- Richard Franklin, Esq. Vavasour, Bart. Cricklade. — Thomas Calley, Esq. Richmond-0. Tomlin, Esq. M.P.

Ripon-D. Cayley, Esq. Darlington-Francis Mewburn, Esq. Scarborough-E. H. Hebden, Esq. Doncaster-Sir W. Cooke, Bart. Slockton-on-Tees—Thomas Meynell, Durham --H. J. Spearman, Esq. Esq. EdinburghThe Rt. Hon. Sir John Swansea - Joseph Bird, Esq. Sinclair, Bart.

Tamworth-J. Holte Bracebridge, Ereter-Ralph Barnes, Esq.

Esq. Greenock-R. Wallace, Esq. M.. P. Waruick-Chandos Leigh, Esq. Huddersfield Mr. Richard Oastler. Whitby Dr. Loy. Hull-Jarnes Iveson, Esq.

Worcester--R. Spooner, Esq. and Knaresborough-Mr. John Howgate. J. M. Gutch, Esq. Leicester-Sir Edmund Hartopp, Bt. York - Thomas Laycock, Esq.

Communications to be sent to the Secretary, post paid.

"A LONG PULL, AND A STRONG PULL, AND A PULL ALL-TOGETHER,”

FOR BETTER PRICES, BETTER PROFITS, AND BETTER WAGES.

A PROPHECY

In those days, when England shall have left to perish as intruders on the world of reached the measure of her greatness, verily our Lords the Monied Interest. the hour of her tribulation will be at hand. And, in pursuance of these " sound and And it shall come to pass, that the Nation wholesome" principles, the Philosopher male shall be delivered up for sport and for expe- and female shall propose to diminish the riment, to Loan Jobbers and to Political superabundant population by beastly “preEconomists.

ventive checks” and the morality of inAnd, they shall declare that there is a fanticide! superabundant currency, a superabundant And, our too luxuriant manufactures and population, and a superabundant produce; commerce shall be pruned down to a "sound whereas in truth, there will be no supera- and wholesome" standard, by the removal bundance whatever, except of knavery and of all protecting duties, which will afford folly in their respective brains.

matter of gain and derision to other nations, And, the Nation being prosperous, power. while bankruptcy, desolation, misery and ful and happy, the Philosophers shall pro- despair shall hourly increase at home. nounce its condition to be repugnant to But, the rulers of the state shall adhere "sound general principles ;” and they shall nobly to the "sound and wholesome;" and assert that meat, drink, and clothing, and the Sages shall tell them that it is wrong all other necessaries or comforts, if pur- for a Government to interfere in the way of chased by an artificial currency, are unsub- relief, and the wretchedness and destitution stantial and ideal; and that it is far better of millions shall be left to “the working of to be in a state of solid, tangible misery, Events." than of such fictitious prosperity.

And, if any sufferer should venture to And, having said those things, they shall complain, or to question the wisdom of the be permitted to act accordingly.

" sound and wholesome," he shall be asThen, in pursuance of the “sound and sailed as a public robber, a violator of good cholesome principles," a law shall be passed faith, and it shall be demonstrated to conto double the amount of every man's debts; and this shall be called "stern justice and viction, by h +4-m=bgood faith!”

And, Loan Mongers shall rejoice thereat And, impudence shall be unto the Philo. exceedingly, and Usurers shall extol the sophers as a triple shield of brass. national honour.

And, it shall be said in the Great Council, And, paradox shall in all cases be admit- that it would be desirable to render the ted as self evident fact; sophistry shall Nation dependent on foreign harvests for supersede argument, and the practical ex- food; and astonishing nonsense shall thereon perience of ages, on which the wealth, great be talked touching free trade and the theory ness, and fame of England were founded, of Exchanges. shall be called " antiquated absurdity.” And, to all these rigmaroles the great

And, all the celebrated Statesmen and Council shall lend an admiring ear; and Legislators from Lycurgus to Napoleon, shall Political Economists shall wax powerful, be pronounced ignorant blockheads. and in defiance of human reason and of

Then, shall the strength of a People be human suffering, shall be upheld in their deemed to consist in the fewness of its wild and mischievous schemes ; and lo! connumbers, and the wealth of a Country in fiscation and crime shall proceed with acthe scantiness of its produce.

celerated pace. And, an abundant harvest shall be de- And, persons of great rank and of greater clared a curse, and a numerous progeny a dulness, shall be persuaded that they pergrievous misfortune.

fectly comprehend the mysteries of the And, it shall be held presumption in any “sound and wholesome"; and because the man to propagate his species, except he be arguments of the Philosophers are hollow, a money dealer, or in the enjoyment of a shall fancy that they are profound. protected income.

And, in the midst of all this havoc, the And, the offspring of all others shall be unhappy victims thereof instead of uniting considered as mere human rubbish, and be against the unfeeling plunderers, shall be

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