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North Carolina.
North Dakota.
Ohio.- JAKO
Oklahoma.
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota.
Tennessee..
Texas..
Utah.....a
Vermont.
Virginia
Washington.
West Virginia
Wisconsin.
Wyoming-

6, 297, 760, 000
2, 869, 620, 000
21, 632, 520,000
4,672, 330, 000
4,010, 110,000
33, 699, 640,000
2, 244, 190,000
2,796, 040,000
3, 421, 470,000
4, 929, 860,000
11, 515, 270,000
1, 802, 710,000

993, 330, 000
5, 702, 450,000
5,996, 770, 000
5, 481, 710,000
9, 197, 500,000
1, 140, 490,000

1, 228, 643, 400

412, 537, 200 5, 389, 888, 200 1, 390, 071,000

744, 360, 600
8, 331, 457, 800

645, 710, 400
798, 169, 800
484, 282, 800
085, 152, 200
3, 246, 488, 400

331, 823, 400

260, 077, 800 1, 264, 516, 200 1, 291, 420, 800

968, 565, 600 2,080, 622, 400

224, 205, 000

148, 802, 000

92, 910, 000 1, 252, 637, 000

92, 915, 000 113, 776,000 2, 336, 513, 000

321, 865, 000
103, 694, 000

85, 568,000
165, 512, 000
164, 924, 000

64, 395, 000
182, 272, 000
229, 383, 000
192, 423, 000
154, 822, 000
489, 951,000
21, 622, 000

102, 640, 400

9,062, 400
407, 142, 300
58, 260, 100
39, 942, 551*
552, 683, 400
41, 385, 000
18, 217, 700

7, 555, 900
67, 373, 300
232, 411, 800
14, 302, 346*
10, 374, 900
49, 549, 100
55, 909, 170*
56, 348, 600
117, 197, 100

8, 217, 348*

64, 270, 558 25, 583, 426 374, 391,600 66, 142, 516 58, 030, 698 559, 715, 442 40, 559, 090 38,063, 146 31, 823, 286 69, 886, 432 190, 315, 730 23,087, 482 14, 351, 678 74, 878, 320 96, 717, 830 63, 646, 572 142, 268, 808 13, 103, 706

34, 601, 669 14, 352, 168 127, 579, 422 28, 999, 229 18, 949, 947 169, 643, 289 10, 208, 133 16,058, 366 15, 129, 260 20, 501, 486 65, 128, 019 10,012, 894 4, 525, 831 21, 755, 438 30, 727, 980 26, 235, 479 45, 516,000 6, 838, 253

. .

You can obtain the figures for your State by reading the table as follows: In 1926 the value of tangible property in Connecticut was $6,180,720,000; the yearly income was $1,416,975,600; the amount in savings accounts was $739,038,000. This State expended $102,500,600 for construction of buildings; and a total of $98,589,788 for the following articles: Soft drinks and ice cream, theaters, candy, chewing gum, tobacco, sporting, goods and toys, jewelry, perfumes, and cosmetics. As compared with these indications of its resources and buying power, Connecticut expended $32,765,727 in 1926 for public elementary and secondary schools.

The following statements may be made for the United States, based upon the percentages of columns 8 to 12. For every half cent (0.55 c.) expended in 1926 for public schools the people of the United States had $100 of tangible wealth; for every $2.25 expended for schools the people of the United States had $100 of current income; for every $8.18 expended for schools there was $100 in the savings accounts; for every $29.42 expended for schools the people of the United States expended $100 for building construction; and for every $32.39 expended for school $100 was expended for the above mentioned luxuries. A similar statement may be prepared for your State, using the percentages given. For a further discussion of the significance of tables such as this consult pages 8 and 9, and 28 and 29 of the January, 1927, issue of the Research Bulletin of the National Education Association.

Sources of data.The value of tangible property in the United States is estimated from data of the National Bureau of Economic Research, the National Industrial Conference Board, and the United States Bureau of the Census. Income for the United States from News Bulletin of the National Bureau of Economic Research, February 21, 1927. The total was distributed among the States on the basis of the per cent of total income found in the States in the years 1919 and 1920. Amounts in savings accounts are compiled by American Bankers Association, New York City. Expenditures_for building construction were obtained from the F. W. Dodge Corporation. The figures followed by an asterisk are independently estimated. The expenditures for luxuries are rough estimates based upon the best figures available. Figures as to cost of public elementary and secondary schools are those of the United States Bureau of Education. They include building costs as well as current expenses. The cost of education in Florida is double that for the previous year, owing to the fact that heavy expenditures for buildings were necessary to replace school property destroyed by the tornado. Similar special circumstances affect the expenditures of certain other States.

Membership in Departments of the National Education Association, 1927 (From the Journal of the National Education Association, March, 1928-prepared by the research

division of the National Education Association

Department of super

intendence

Department of secondary Department of elementary school principals

school principals

States and other units

Num- Num- Per
Num- Num- Per

Num- Num- Per
ber ber cent

ber ber cent Rank

ber ber cent Rank of eligi

Rank
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United States.--7, 284 3, 114 42.75 Alabama..

117 58 49. 57 Arizona..

38 26 68. 42 Arkansas.

120 49 40.83 California.

213 92 43. 19 Colorado.

46 44. 66 Connecticut.

123 55 44. 72 Delaware

17 14 82. 35 District of Columbia.. 34 21 61. 76 Florida.

99 34 34. 34 Georgia

231 48 20. 78 Idaho.

70 10 14. 29 Illinois

315 194 61. 59 Indiana

207 88 42. 51 Iowa.

192

71 36.98 Kansas.

176 77 43. 75

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Membership in Departments of the National Education Associations, 1927—Con

Department of super

intendence

Department of secondary Department of elementary school principals

school principals

States and other units

Num- Num- Per
Num- Num- Per

Num- Num- Per
ber ber cent

ber ber Rank

cent

ber ber cent Rank eligi

Rank
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182 111 191

52 281 201 160 120 201

77 136

9 88 175

48 458 164

72 264 153

65 432 49 82 88 149 392

56 116 155

86 104 182 35 2 2 1

34 49 23 33 121 152 65 53 84 13 44

1 19 133

13 178 48 13 159 86 10 193 29 20 22 29 334 19 11 36 20 43 104 21 1

18. 68 44. 14 12.04 63. 46 43. 06 75. 62 40. 63 44. 17 41. 79 16. 88 32. 35 11. 11 21. 59 76.00 27.08 38. 86 29. 27 18. 06 60. 23 56. 21 15. 38 44. 68 59. 18 24. 39 25.00 19. 46 85. 20 33. 93

9. 48 23. 23 23. 26 41. 35 57. 14 60.00 50.00

44 623
20 353
49 224

6 186
23 378

4 682 28 560 19 513 25 877 46 217 34 620 51 34 41 108

3 189
36 124
29 902
35 733
45 487

9
13 707
47 299
17 1, 136
11 26
38 322
37 337
43 430
1

1, 200
33 94
52 98
40 515
39 374
26 289
12 473
10 80
14 12

Kentucky.
Louisiana.
Maine.
Maryland.
Massachusetts.
Michigan..
Minnesota.
Mississippi.
Missouri.
Montana.
Nebraska.
Nevada.
New Hampshire.
New Jersey
New Mexico.
New York.
North Carolina.
North Dakota.
Ohio.
Oklahoma.
Oregon..
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina.
South Dakota..
Tennessee
Texas.
Utah..
Vermont.
Virginia.
Washington
West Virginia.
Wisconsin.
Wyoming
Alaska..
American Samoa..
Canal Zone.
Foreign.
Guam.
Hawaii.
Philippine Islands.
Porto Rico.
Virgin Islands.

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5 276 54 24 321 69 96 300 14 14 19 29 205 39

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377 2, 181

290 2, 330 7, 706

565

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This table compares membership of the various States in three departments of the National Education Association. You may obtain figures for your State by reading the table as follows: In Alabama there are 117 school executives eligible for active membership in the department of superintendence. This State has 58 members in this department. ' In Alabama 49.57 per cent of those eligible for membership in this department are members. This gives Alabama a rank of fifteenth among the States and Territories as to the per cent of those eligible who hold membership in the department of superintendence.

in Alabama there are 327 principals of secondary schools. This State has seven members in the department of secondary school principals. In Alabama 2.14 per cent of those eligible for membership in this department are members. This gives Alabama a rank of 38.5 among the States and Territories as to the per cent of those eligible who hold memberhsip in the department of secondary school principals.

In Alabama there are 2,844 principals of elementary schools. This State has 48 members in the department of elementary school principals. In Alabama 1.69 per cent of those eligible for membership in this department are members. This

gives Alabama a rank of 40 among the States and Territories as to the per cent of those eligible who hold membership in the department of elementary school principals.

Do superintendents, seconday school principals, or elementary school principals have the highest per cent of membership in their professional departments in your State?

Column 2 includes chief executive officers of public-school systems, State, county, and local, even though the title is not superintendent in all cases, and heads of normal schools and teacher-training institutions. Column 6 includes principals of public junior, senior, four-year high schools, and of combined high schools and elementary schools. Column 7 is the membership of the National Association of Secondary School Principals. Column 10 includes principals or head teachers of elementary schools having two or more teachers.

Growth of Education Associations

(From the Journal of the National Education Association, April, 1928)

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