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1 Column 8 enables each State to compare its membership achievement with that of other States in its size group. The States marked “A” have 30,001 or more teachers; those marked "B" have 20,001 to 30,000 teachers; "C" 10,001 to 20,000;“D" 2,001 to 10,000; “E” 2,000 or under.

? Includes enrollment in both white and colored associations (separate organizations).
3 Indicates that the figure is an estimate.
* Does not include city of Wilmington.

Figure does not include members enrolled in State-wide organizations for colored teachers.
The per cents in excess of 100 per cent are accounted for by the fact that members are enrolled among teachers in private schools, institutions of higher learning, and laymen.

1 The rank of the New York State Association is lowered by the fact that New York City teachers at present work largely through local organizations. There a are pproximately 30,000 teachers in New York City.

This table shows the growth of professional organizations and indicates the relative standing of each of the States with respect to membership in both National and State associations. The total membership in the National Education Association was 4,982 on January 1, 1908; 170,053 on January 1, 1927; and 181,350 on January 1, 1928. This latter figure is 20.12 per cent of the 901,280 teachers in the United States and Territories.

The figures for State associations for January 1, 1908, show a membership in these associations of 65,993. The figures for January, 1927, are 613,728, and for January 1, 1928, are 650,368, which is 72.16 per cent of the 901,280 teachers in the United States and Territories.

In the United States in 1927, 19.07 per cent of the teachers of the country were enrolled in the National Education Association; the corresponding per cent for 1928 given at the head of column 6 is 20.12. During the same year the per cent of teachers enrolled in State associations increased from 68.84 to 72.16, the per cent given at the head of column 11. The preceding per cents are based upon estimates as to the number of teachers in each State in 1927 and 1928. These estimates are as accurate as available data permit. The figures of column 2 include teachers, principals, supervisors, and administrative officers. The figures for State associations are based on signed reports from the officers of those associations.

Enrollment in American schools during 1925–26, including elemenatry, secondary, and higher institutions, public and private

(From the Journal of the National Education Association, May, 1928—Prepared by the Research Division of the National Education Association)

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New Jersey
New Mexico...
New York
North Carolina.
North Dakota.
Ohio.
Oklahoma..
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina.
South Dakota..
Tennessee
Texas.
Utah..
Vermont.
Virginia..
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin.
Wyoming
Alaska.
American Samoa.
Canal Zone
Guam.
Hawaii.
Philippine Islands
Porto Rico
Virgin Islands.

874,563

116, 768 2,555, 594

925, 773

223, 190 1, 468, 838

721, 948

200, 970 2, 479, 852

154, 688 612, 842 187, 582

742, 617
1, 538, 518

152, 132
85, 066
731, 778
348, 860
487, 691
710, 552
58, 411

629, 774

79, 529 1, 643, 215

734, 170

149, 565 1, 031, 644

565, 884

142, 711
1, 581, 767

96, 486
435, 425
138, 166

600, 584
1,015, 951
110, 695

53, 551
481, 799
258, 814
346, 716
415, 888
40, 474
3,772
1,800
4, 303
2,837

54, 782
1,053, 799
206, 201

3,070

114, 563

1,389

6, 778
146, 479

7, 218
89, 972

1 Includes pupils in college preparatory departments connected with higher institutions.
: Includes collegiate departments, graduate and professional schools.
3 In column 12 the figure for each štate is the per cent that the sum of columns 3, 4, 5, and 6 for a given State is of its population 5 to 17 years of age.

* The ratio of elementary and secondary school enrollment to population 5 to 17 years of age is more than 100 per cent due to one or more of the following factors: (1) Children
below 5 or above 17 years of age are enrolled in elementary and secondary schools; (2) the estimates of population increase since 1920 of those 5 to 17 years of age may be too low; and
(3) reports as to enrollment made to the U. S. Bureau of Education may include duplicates. These same factors probably enter to some degree to affect the figures for all States.

• Estimates as to population 5 to 17 years of age are not available for Territories, consequently the data given for Territories are not complete.

You can obtain the figures for your State as follows:

In Alabama there were 829,729 (column 2) children 5 to 17 years of age. The enrollment in public elementary schools was 538,984 (column 3); in private elementary schools, 13,461 (column 4); in public secondary schools, 51,511 (column 5); in private secondary schools, 7,062 (column 6); in public higher institutions, 4,509 (column 7); and in private higher institutions, 3,191 (column 8). A total of 595,004 (column 9) students were enrolled in all public schools (elementary, secondary, and higher institutions) and a total of 23,714 (column 10) students were enrolled in all private schools, making a grand total of 618,718 (column 11) students enrolled in all elementary, secondary, and higher institutions, both public and private.

The per cent relationship of enrollment in elementary and secondary schools (611,018—the sums of columns 3, 4, 5, and 6) to population 5 to 17 years of age in Alabama (829,728) was 73.64 per cent. This per cent gives Alabama the ratio of enrollment in elementary and secondary rank of 47 among the States of the Union in schools to population 5 to 17 years of age.

Source of data: Figures of columns 2 to 8, inclusive were obtained through the courtesy of the statistical division of the United States Bureau of Education.

Figures showing membership growth in National Education Association and its

constituent affiliated State associations during the period when the movement for a department of education has been most active

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Mr. BLACK. Could you tell us the names of anybody who ever, before any of these associations you are in contact with, expressed themselves as being against this bill in any of these meetings leading up to resolutions for the bill?

Mr. MORGAN. There have been scores of discussions. It would be unnecessary to take the time of this committee to tell of those discussions. The proceedings of the National Education Association have been spread out in full. You heard Doctor Judd tell you he opposed the old measure.

Mr. BLACK. I mean on this particular bill, whether there was any kind of real opposition to the bill in the National Educational Association.

Mr. MORGAN. This bill was developed after a most elaborate discussion. Perhaps it would be worth while to recall here

Mr. Robsion. Mr. Black is trying to bring out if there was any opposition expressed.

Mr. BLACK. In this association.

Mr. MORGAN. There was very little opposition. In a vote that involved a thousand people you might have two or three or a half dozen scattering votes in the negative.

Mr. Black. Are there any of the education journals affiliated with the organizations you speak of that are opposed to this bill?

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