Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

(Resolution of the National Education Association, Washington, D. C., 1924) We, the members of the representative assembly of the National Education Association, here assembled in the National Capital, reaffirm our devoted and unqualified support of the education bill now pending in Congress. We believe that Federal leadership as provided by the creation of a department of education, with a secretary in the President's Cabinet, is essential to the development of the highest degree of efficiency in the schools of the nation. We know that the Federal Government has an obligation to support research and investigation and to disseminate information with regard to public education comparable to that undertaken by other Federal departments. We are convinced that the Nation should contribute to the development of a nationwide program for the removal of illiteracy, the Americanization of the foreign born, the training of teachers, the development of a program of physical education and the equalization of educational opportunity. This leadership, to be provided by a secretary of education in the President's Cabinet and the Federal aid required to promote the program of education on a broad scale, can and should be accomplished without any interference on the part of the Federal Government in the constitutional right of the States to organize, administer, supervise and control their own schools. It is gratifying to note that the two great political parties have in their platforms recognized that education is one of the chief concerns of the nation and that the President of the United States is favorable to the establishment of a new department emphasizing the importance of education.

(Resolution passed by the Delegate Assembly of the National Education Association, Indianapolis, Ind.,

July 3, 1925)

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

We believe that education is a matter of primary concern to the Nation as a whole. This national responsibility for education has been recognized from the earliest days of the Republic by grants of land and of money to the several States in support of their public school systems.

We hold that the Federal Government should promote the further development of our State and local school systems through the establishment of a department of education with a secretary in the President's Cabinet.

Efficiency and economy demand that the several agencies of the Federal Government dealing with education now distributed among the several executive departments be consolidated in a department of education. We know that this department, operating as a fact-finding and fact-distributing agency, will aid the several States to improve and to develop their public schools.

We urge the Congress to create a department of education in accord with the principles embodied in the bill adopted by this body.

(Resolution passed by the Delegate Assembly of the National Education Association, Philadelphia, Pa.,

July 2, 1926)

EDUCATION BILL

The welfare of the children now enrolled in the schools of the United States is dependent upon our ability to make available to boards of education, to superintendents of schools, and to teachers throughout the Nation the results of current practice, of experiments wherever they are conducted, and of the results of scientific investigation. The Federal Government has long recognized its obligation in the field of scientific inquiry and has promoted the welfare of all the people through the activities of the Departments of Agricluture, Commerce, and Labor. We hold that economy and efficiency demand that the activities of the Federal Government dealing with education be consolidated in a department of education under the leadership of a secretary with a seat in the President's Cabinet. We urge that adequate support be provided for this department in order that it may conduct such inquiries and disseminate such information as will make for the highest degree of efficiency in all of our schools. We know that this service can be rendered without in any way interfering with the constitutional right of the several States to control, administer, and supervise their own schools. We, therefore, urge the Congress to pass the Curtis-Reed bill which embodies the program which this Association has consistently advocated throughout its history.

(Resolution passed by the Delegate Assembly of the National Education Association, Seattle, Wash., July

1927]

EDUCATION BILL

That the Federal Government, which has long accepted responsibility for conducting inquiries and disseminating information concerning the public schools of the Nation, enlarge the scope of its scientific inquiry with respect to education and increase its support of this undertaking. That this most important function of the National Government can be best carried out by the establishment of a department of education with a secretary in the President's Cabinet. We pledge our aggressive support to the Curtis-Reed bill which provides for the establishment of a department of education and for the more adequate support of scientific research in education under the direction of a secretary of education,

(Resolution of the Department of Superintendence, at Chicago, Ii., February 24-March 1, 1919)

Declaring that education in a democracy is the most important function of the government, that it is a national, state, and local responsibility, and that each should contribute to its support; we urge, therefore, the passage of the SmithTowner education bill by Congress. In order that education may be given proper recognition by the National Government, we ask for the immediate creation of a department of education with a secretary who shall be a member of the President's Cabinet.

(Resolution of the Department of Superintendence, Cleveland, Ohio, February 23-28, 1920)

We reaffirm our indorsement of a department of education with a secretary of education in the President's Cabinet, and generous appropriations by Congress to aid and encourage the States in the promotion of education with the express provisions that Federal aid shall not imply Federal control of supervision of education, and that education in all its phases shall be organized, supervised, and administered exclusively. þy, state and local educational authorities, established by State laws, as provided in the Smith-Towner Bill, now pending in the Sixty-sixth Congress.

[Resolution of the Department of Superintendence, Atlantic City, February 24-March 3, 1921)

We reindorse the principles of the Smith-Towner education bill which has been reported favorably by both the House of Representatives and the Senate. We believe administrative procedure requires that many of the educational agencies now uncoordinated in the National Government be organized in a single executive department and we maintain that the dignity of the profession be recognized by placing the head of that department in the Cabinet of the President.

We hold that long-established practice of the Federal Government in providing aid to education within the States should be continued, and that the authorization of an appropriation by the Smith-Towner bill for the removal of illiteracy, for the Americanization of the foreign born, and for the equilization of educational opportunities are not only necessary in the present crisis but are also completely in accord with our most securely established American practice. We call especial attention to the fact that the bill expressly provides that the organization, administration, and supervision of the schools, aided by the provisions of the act shall be exercised exclusively by the legally constituted state and local educational authorities.

[ocr errors]

[Resolution Department of Superintendence, Chicago, III., February 27-March 2, 1922] Believing that the Towner-Sterling bill now before Congress recognizes and embodies the policy of the undivided responsibility and authority of the State in matters of education, we reaffirm our approval of the principles of that bill.

(Resolution of the Department of Superintendence, Cleveland, Ohio, February 26-March 1, 1923] We recognize that a department of education is necessary in order that the educational activities of our National Government shall be efficiently and economically administered. We believe that national sanction and national leadership can be provided only in the person of a secretary of education in the President's Cabinet. Federal aid for the purpose of stimulating the several States to remove

illiteracy, Americanize the foreign born, prepare teachers, develop adequate programs of physical education, and equalize educational opportunities, is in accord with our long-established practice and is demanded by the present crisis in education. We therefore reaffirm our allegiance to the Towner-Sterling bill.

(Resolution, Department of Superintendence, Chicago, Ill., February 29- March 1, 1924)

We have noted with great satisfaction and approval that President Coolidge in his first message to Congress gave expression to his high regard for education and to a belief that education is a fundamental requirement of national activity and is worthy of a department in the National Government and a place in the Cabinet.

The clear and forceful statement of the President in his message has greatly encouraged us in the hope for an early and favorable consideration of the educa. tion bill now before Congress.

We affirm our allegiance to the education bill in the language of the resolution adopted last year as follows:

• We recognize that a department of education is necessary in order that the educational activities of our National Government shall be efficiently and economically administered. We believe that national sanction and national leadership can be provided only in the person of a secretary of education in the President's Cabinet. Federal aid for the purpose of stimulating the several States to remove illiteracy, Americanize the foreign born, prepare teachers, develop adequate programs of physical education, and equalize educational opportunities, is in accord with our long-established practice and is demanded by the present crisis in education."

concern.

[Resolution of the Department of Superintendence, February 26, 1925, Cincinnati, Ohio) We have carefully noted and confidently rely on the declarations of President Coolidge before the National Education Association in Washington last July with reference to proposed legislation recognizing education as of vital national

National welfare demands for each person that measure and kind of education which is basal to effective participation in our democratic life. The Federal Government has contributed to the realization of this ideal by grants of land and of money to the States. This principle, long acknowledged, and this practice, long established, should-without interfering with the control of education by the several States-be maintained and extended.

The present diverse and scattered educational activities of the Federal Government should at once, in the interest of efficiency as well as of economy, be unified in a department of educaton with a secretary in the President's Cabinet.

To the foregoing principles we again pledge our unswerving faith and active support.

(Resolution, Department of Superintendence, Washington, D. C., February 25, 1926]

The American public school is the bulwark of our civil and religious liberties. The moral responsibility for the encouragement and advancement of this basic institution rests upon the Federal Government. As President Coolidge said in his address before the National Education Association on July 4, 1924, “For a long time the cause of education has been regarded as so important and so preeminently an American cause that the National Government has sought to encourage it, scientifically to investigate its needs, and to furnish information and advice for its constant advancement."

We heartily indorse the education bill now before Congress (S. 291 and H. R. 5000). This bill does not permit of any interference with the complete autonomy of the States in the administration and control of their schools but it goes provide for the more efficient participation of the Federal Government by coordinating its present educational activities and by extending the scope of its scientific investigations. This bill further provides by its creation of a department of education with a secretary in the President's Cabinet for that recognition and service which the importance of public education merits and the advancement of education requires.

We, therefore, urge upon the committees to which this bill has been referred that they report it for the consideration of the representatives of the people. We also respectfully urge that Members of Congress consider this bill in terms of its provisions for meeting the Nation's most fundamental need

(Resolution, Department of Superintendence, Dallas, Tei. [arch 3, 1927) The development of our American program of education is dependent upon the contribution made by the several States and localities which make up the Nation. The Federal Government has long accepted the responsibility for conducting inquiries and disseminating information in support of the programs which are controlled and administered locally. We believe that further progress in education throughout the nation is dependent upon scientific inquiry, which should be conducted by the National Government, and the results of which should be made available to all who work in education. We believe that this most important function can be best carried out by the establishment of a department of education, with a secretary in the President's Cabinet. We pledge our aggressive support to the Curtis-Řeed bill, which is now before Congress, and which provides for the establishment of a department of education and for the more adequate support of scientific research in education under the direction of a secretary of education.

(Resolution passed by the 1926 session of the Arkansas Education Association) We urge the Congressmen and Senators to vote for the Curtis-Reed bill.

(Resolution adopted by the Alabama Education Association, at Birmingham, Ala., April, 1927]

CURTIS-REED BILL

Whereas the Curtis-Reed bill now pending in Congress provides for the creation of a department of education with a secretary in the President's Cabinet; and

Whereas this bill interferes in no way with the administration of education in the States and is otherwise free from objectionable features hitherto found in proposed legislation of this character; and

Whereas the creation of a department of education as provided in the CurtisReed bill dignifies the cause of education and extends to it the recognition it deserves; Therefore, be it

Resolved, First, that the Alabama Education Association representing more than 12,000 public-school teachers of the State indorses the Curtis-Reed bill;

Second. That a copy of this resolution be forwarded by the secretary of the association to each Member of the Alabama delegation in Congress, with the request that he vote for this bill and otherwise use his influence to secure its passage. (Resolution adopted by the Arizona State Education Association at Phoenix, Ariz., December, 1927)

Resolved, That we reaffirm our belief that education may best be fostered by the establishment of a department of education with a secretary in the President's Cabinet, and, therefore, pledge our active support to the Curtis-Reed bill, providing for the establishment of a department of education and for the more adequate support of scientific research in education.

(Resolution adopted by the Colorado Education Association, 1927] Resolved, That the Federal Government, which has long accepted responsibility for conducting inquiries and disseminating information, enlarge the scope of its scientific inquiry with respect to education and increase its support of this undertaking. That this most important function of the National Government can be best carried out by the establishment of a department of education with a secretary in the President's Cabinet. We fully appreciate President Coolidge's interest in education, but recommend that the proposed Cabinet member head the department of education alone, rather than of education and welfare.

(Resolution adopted by the Florida Education Association at Tampa, Fla., December 30, 1927) Whereas the education bill now before Congress, providing for a department of education with a secretary in the President's Cabinet, has been indorsed by the National Education Association; and

Whereas this measure does not appear to endanger the rights of the States to control their own educational affairs; Be it

Resolved, That this association, through its executive secretary, request the Florida delegation in Congress to support said education bill if, in their opinion, it does not interfere with the rights of the States to organize and administer their own school systems in their own way.

a

[Resolution adopted by the Georgia Education Association at Atlanta, Ga., on April 14, 1928)

Resolved, That the Georgia Education Association reindorses the efforts of the National Education Association and other leaders of education to have a secretary of education in the President's Cabinet and urge our Senators and Congressmen to support the bill providing for such.

[Resolution adopted by the Illinois State Teach ers' Association at Springfield, Ill., in December, 1927]

Resolved, That the Federal Government, which has long accepted responsibility for conducting inquiries and disseminating information concerning the public schools of the Nation, should enlarge the scope of its scientific inquiry with respect to education and increase its support of this undertaking. This most important function of the National Government can best be carried out by the establishment of a department of education with a secretary in the President's Cabinet. We pledge our aggressive support to the Curtis-Reed bill, which provides for the establishment of a department of education and for the more adequate support of scientific research in education under the direction of a secretary of education.

[Resolution adopted by the Indiana State Teachers' Association at Indianapolis, Ind., November, 1927)

We commend the work of the National Education Association in its effort to create a Federal education department with an officer in the President's Cabinet.

[Resolution adopted by the representative assembly of the Kansas State Teachers' Association, March 12,

1927]

We wish to reiterate our firm belief in the necessity of greater unification in the work of the Federal Government in education, in order that the waste of duplicated and scattered effort may be avoided and that education in the United States may receive the recognition to which it is properly entitled.

[Resolution of the Kentucky Education Association, Louisville, Ky.)

Resolved, That the Kentucky Education Association now in session, with an attendance of 7,000 educators and representing 14,000 teachers in the State, reaffirm our indorsement of the new education bill now before Congress providing for a department of education with a representative in the President's Cabinet of the United States. We further urge our Senators and Representatives to give their indorsement to the bill and do everything possible for its immediate passage in the House and Senate of the United States Congress.

[Resolution adopted by the Louisiana Teachers' Association, November, 1925)

Resolved, That we indorse the national education bill in its present form, which provides for the creation of a department of education with a secretary in the President's Cabinet.

[Resolutions passed by the Maine Teachers' Association, Bangor, Me., October, 1926)

Be it resolved, That we continue our unqualified support of those measures which seek to establish in our National Government a department of education upon the same basis as the other departments of the Federal Government, with a secretary in the President's Cabinet.

[Resolution adopted by Minnesota Education Association at Minneapolis, Minn., November 10, 1927)

Resolved, That we pledge our aggressive support to the national education bill, which provides for the establishment of a department of education and for the more adequate support of scientific research in education, under the direction of a secretary of education in the President's Cabinet.

[Resolution adopted by the Missouri State Teachers' Association at St. Louis, Mo., November 10, 1927)

Resolved, That we heartily indorse the proposed legislation providing for the creation of a Federal department of education with a secretary in the President's Cabinet.

« AnteriorContinuar »