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Articles.
Almonds....
Olives.......
Raisins......
Saffron.......
Pepper, ground & ungrou'd
Oil, common....
Wine, common.
Wine, other.....
Preserved food.
Pressed meat....
Soup paste (vermicelli, etc.)

Erports from Spain to Cuba-Continued.
1893.
1896.

Articles.
490,927 401,492 Sandals....
1,135,187 608,826 Playing cards...

298,468 224,912 Felt hats......
564,485 1,171,260 Cartridges.....

199,894 307,910 All other articles...........
4,726,328 3,316,218
8,643,136 7,347,015

Total ....
118,841 93,758
5,568,428 4,742,361 Gold.....
1,725,860 1,581,570 Silver...
1,180,380 1,435,999

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- From-

Total Articles. Europe. America. Value.

Articles.

Europe, America. Value. Butter ........cases. 6,338

$319,700 | Coal ...........tons.. 29,050 180,487 $2,085,370 Cheese....... do .. 1,881 44,358 3:23,673 Potatoes ... barrels.. 53,083 231.774 996,702 Rice.... ....cwt.. 853,538 23,800 2,807,481 Maize..........bags.. ......

97,303 467,049 Beer.........barrels.. 4,629 2,860

82,379 Lard............cwt...

194,308 2,078,811 Do ..........cases., 6,574 2,044

43,090 Salt fish......drums..

5,036
5,036 79,521 686,000
Total..

$14,175,777 Flour.......... bags.. 404,019 100,321 4,285,522)

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The trade of Mexico with Cuba during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1897, was: Imports from Cuba, $363; exports to Cuba, $26,700. The commerce of the island with the principal European countries cannot be given with accuracy, as the various official statistics include Porto Rico in the statements of trade-the figures for Germany comprising other Spanish dependencies as well. The commerce of the United Kingdom, France, and Belgium with Cuba and Porto Rico in 1896 was as follows the figures for the United States and Spain for the same year being repeated for comparative purposes : Country. Imports. Exports.

Country.

Imports. Exports. United Kingdom...... 3174,187 $5,843,892 United States...

$40,017,730 dies.............

$7,530,880 Belgium...............

208,304 1,089,239
Spain..............

4,257,360 26,145,800 France...................

3,338,900 424,600

Railroads, Etc.

(From the “Railroad Gazette.")

Length.
Miles.
37.25

24.75
211
64.5
38
18.75
22.4
24.25

34

16

Name of Company.

Headquarters. 1. Caibarien........ ..............cal

.Caibarien.......... 3. Cardenas & Jucaro............

...Cardenas..... Cienfuegos-Santa Clara...

..Cienfuegos......... 5. Cuba-Sabanilla-Maroto. Santiago de Cuba.. 6. Gibara & Holguin..

.Gibara... 7. Guantanamo.......

Guantanamo....... 8. Las Tuñas y Sancti Spiritus.... Sancti Spiritus..... 9. Marianao & Havana............ Havana....... 10. Matanzas...

.........Mulanzas........... 11. Puerto Principe & Nuevitas... Puerto Principe.... 12. Sagua la Grande............. Sagua la Grande... 13. 14. United of Havana.............. Havana.. 15. 16. Urbano..... 17. Western of Havana.....

Pas

Loco- senger Freight
Gauge, motives. Cars. Cars.
4 ft. 8.5 in.

12

196 3 ft.

8

245 4 ft. 8.5 in.

1,130 4 ft. 8.5 in.

455
4 ft. 8.5 in.

3 ft.
4 ft. 8.5 in.
4 ft. 8.5 in.
4 ft. 8.5 in.
4 ft. 8.5 in.

1,070
5 ft.
4 ft. 8.5 in.

548
2 ft. 6 in.

40
4 ft. 8.5 in.

1.819
2 ft.6 in.
4 ft. 8.5 in.
4 ft. 8.5 in.

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93

7

11 12.3 110

There are 2.300 miles of telegraph line with 153 offices. Messages in 1894, 357,914.

PORTO RICO.

Area and Population. In 1887, the population numbered 813,937, 300,000 of which were negroes. It has an area of about 3,668 square miles-35 miles broad and 95 miles long. The chief city, San Juan, numbers 23,414 inhabitants; Ponce, 37,545; San German, 30,146.

Industries. Agriculture and lumbering are the chief industries of the island. The principal crops are sugar, tobacco, coffee, cotton, corn, rice, bananas, pineapples, and many other fruits.

Gold, copper, and iron are found, as also a large variety of marbles, limestones, and other building stones. There are salt works on the island of considerable importance.

Commerce.

TOTAL IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF MERCHANDISE.
Total

Total
Imports

Imports and

and Calendar Years. Imports. *Exports. Exports.. Calendar Years. Imports. *Exports. Exports. 1887 $10,6:27,510 $10,610,091 $21,237,601 1892..

.. $16,483,754 $15,512,041 $31,097,395 1888.. 13,886,034 11,579,281 25,465,315 | 1893..

16,714,238 16,159,304 32,873,542 1889.. 13,681,362 10,679,350 24,360,712 1894.

19,086,336 16,690,191 35,776,527 1890..... 17,592,322 10,335,651 27,927,973 1895.

16,835,453 15,245,639 32,081,092 1891...... 16,274,497 9,539,989 25,814,486 1896...,

18,282,690 18,341,430 36,624,120 Annual average,

Annual average, 1887-1891........ $14,412,345 $10,548,872 $24,961,217 | 1892-1896........ $17,480,494 $16,390,041 $33,870,535 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF MERCHANDISE INTO PORTO RICO DURING 1894 AND 1895, CLASSIFIED

AS AGRICULTURAL AND NON-AGRICULTURAL.

1895.

Imports.

Exports.
Calendar Years-

- Calendar Years -
_-1894-
-1895

1894

1895-
Per Cent.
Per Cent.

Per Cent.

Per Cent. Agricultural....... $7,683,416 40.26 $7,171,352 42.60 $15,853,069 95.58 $14,573,366 95.94 Non-agricultural.. 11,402,920 59.74 9.664,101 57.40

733,612 4.42

617,490 Total........... $19,086,336 100.00 $16,835,453 100.00 $16,586,711 100.00 $15,190,856 100.00

COMMERCE WITH THE UNITED STATES.
The total trade of the United States with Porto Rico is shown as follows:
Imports:

1891.
1892.
1893.
1894.

1896.

1897. Free......

$1,856,955 $3,236,337 $3,994.673 $3,126,895 $375.864 $48,608 $101,711 Dutiable....... 1,307,155 11,670 13,950

8,739

1,131,148 2,248,043 2,079,313 Total......... $3,164,110 $3,248,007 $4,008,623 $3,135,634 $1,506,512 $2,296,653 $2,181,024 Exports:

Domestic....... $2,112, 334 $2,808,631 $2,502,788 $2,705,646 $1,820,203 $2,080,400 $1,964,850 Foreign......... 42,900 47,372 7,819 1 4,862 13,341 21,694

24,138 Total......... $2,155,234 $2,856,003 $2,510,607 $2,720,508 $1,833,544 $2,102,094 $1,988,888

The imports into the United States classed as agricultural and non-agricultural, and of sugar and molasses, for a series of years, appear below : Agricultural Non-agricultural - Sugar

MolassesYears ended Imports.

Imports. Quantities. Values. Quantities. Values. June 30

Per Cent.
Per Cent. Pounds.

Gallons.
1888........
.. $1.383,677 99.39 $26,806

115,654,059 $2.997,721 4.995.306 $1,085,554 1889.. 3,675,195 99.13 32,178 87 81,340,747 2,766,232 3,050,708

804,391 1890..... .. 4,035,863 99.56 17,763

76,926,934 2,750,774 4,106,368 1.110,473 1891............ 3,141,545 99.29 2,565 80,013,632 2,416,403 2,464,314

644,921 1892...... 3,231,115 99.48 16,892 $0,474,517 2,308,657 3,312,448

861.079 Annual av'ge,

1888-1892..... $3,693,879 99.37 $23,241 .63 86,881,988 $2,647,957 3,585,829 $901,284

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Agricultural Non-agricultural Years ended imports.

Imports. June 30

Per Cent.

Per Cent. 1893............

$3,992,718 99.60 315,905 .40 1894.

3,122,046 99.57 13,588 .43 1895.

1,482,171 98.38 24,341 1.62 1896.

2,262,253 98.50 34,400 1.50 1897........ 2,094,319 96.02 86,705 3.98 Annual av'ge,

1893-1897..... $2,590,701 98.67 $34,988 1.33

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Imports from Porto Rico.

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Articles.
Bacon and hams....
Pork, pickled.......
Lard...................
Oleomargarine...
All other meat products.
Dairy products-

Butter..........
Cheese.....
Milk.....

$22,768 14,614 43,065 733,308 23,301

23,529

1.698 516,188

13,379

4,009

9,780 28,721

544

3,022

729

Total....

$561,485
4,123

266

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$837,056
5,873
518
129

$527,706

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Total........
Fruits, including nuts.....
Hops.........::: :
Oil cake and oil-cake meal.
Oils

Animal - Animal & other.
Vegetable--Cotton and

linseed.................. Provisions, compris'g meat

and dairy products-
Beef, canned....
Beef, -alted or pickled...
Tallow....

Vegetables

Beans and peas.....
Onions.
Potatoes..
All other...........

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2,763

$63,470

354 3,894

778

3.020

Total............

$25,969 All other ag'l products.... 2,636

Total ag'l products... $1,639,301

192 2,905

256

$1,160,689

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Exports from Spain.

1893. 143,214

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Articles.
Glass and eart hen ware....
Oils and paints..............
Chemicals, medicines, etc..
Soap...........
Wax and stearine..
Perfumery, etc.....
Cotton, manufactures of...
Flax, hemp, etc., manufac-

tures of.....
Wool, manufactures of.....
Silk, manufactures of....
Paper in rolls......
Writing paper.....
Books, music, et
Packing paper.......
Other paper........
Wood, manufactures of..
Leather............
Shoes...........
Saddlery ........

... ....... Machinery and musical in

struments........

60,352 1,371.872

377,807

274,696 7,299,649 692,628 308,248 330,885

25,598 79,923 76,314 233,907 337,231 404,539

199,866 3,907,360

106,512

1896.

Articles.
81,510 Hams and meats, salted,etc.
129,261 Butter...............

131,494 Rice........
1,255,814 Wheat flour..
701,578 Beans..

307,104 Other dried vegetables..
12,439,767 Oil, common.....

W ine....................
812,912 | Preserved food and pressed
438,688 meat....
229,235 Chocolate and sweets....

83,660 Soup pastes & biscuits, etc
107,074
125, 127 | Playing cards........
350,560 Felt bats.......
176,747 Umbrellas...
463,195 Other articles...........

342,088
5,380,740 Total....
105,120

Silver...................

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.............

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80,246

38,500

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS WITH FOREIGN COUNTRIES.

Imports into Porto Rico.

Annual --Calendar Years Average. From

1893. 1896. 1893-1896. Spain.............

85,012,408 $5,971,445 $5,765,317 United States....... 4,397,614 3,973,855 4,214,375 United Kingdom... 2,177,004 2,267,982 ou

2,136,191 n

607 ow...

04:00 400. Brit. poss'ns, n.e.s.. 1,281,064 1,751,971 1,570,393

Annual Calendar Years Average. From

1893. 1896. 1893-1896. Germany...

$1,148,437 $1,297,429 $1,370,633 British East Indies. 1.080,320 886,339 9 14.485 Cuba.. cuba.............. 03

08,19 705, 154

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The following table shows the quantity of coffee exported to various countries in 1895 and 1890, and the value for the latter year:

Quantities

Quantities-Countries to which 1895. 1896. Values. Countries to which 1895.

Values, Exported. Pounds, Pounds. 1896.

Exported.

Pounds, Pounds. 1800. Spain............. 9,760,620 16,405,900 $3,734,195 United States....... 78,502 322,591 $73,436 France...... 6,232,410 11,306,689 2,573,549 Denmark........

92,872 Germany............

5,237,342 8,120,409 1,848,310 Netherlands....., 16,237 Italy ....

2,665,152 4,388,819 998,951 Danish possessions. 11,382 19,595 Cuba. 14,341,560 15,577,710 3,545,688 | British possessions..

452

105 United Kingdom... 1,117,881 334,119 7 6,050 | Santo Domingo.....

23,501 5,349 Austria-Hungary.. 651,562 2,280,221 519,008 Sweden & Norway.. 38,173

Total............ 40,243,693 58,780,006 $13,379,089

SHIPPING, 1895.

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Entrances.-- -Clearances.
Ton-

Ton-
Country. Vessels. nage. Vessels. nage.
Spain..

150 296,424 121 128,662 England.... 109 135,349

1.580 Germany...

50 79,495

32,740 France,

55,908

65,926 Belgium....

12,751 Italy ........ Cuba...

171 180,772 2012 358,427 United States

190 182,165 284 201,051 Denmark

11 4,686 Austria.......

8,513 Dominican Republic 59

:20,103 60 21,594 Colombia .....

2 1 ,341 ...

16

8,139

Entrances. -Clearances.
Ton-

Ton-
Country.

Vessels. nage. Vessels. nage. Venezuela..

36,089 Haiti.....

2,454 Argentine Republic.

286 Uruguay.....

4,893
Brazil..

2,789
West Indies-
British.

49.997 151 44,285 Danish....

11,140

24,528 Dutch.....

279 French...

1.597 Mexico......

Total............ 1,077 1.079,236 1,070 900,379

525

30

78

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The Philippine Islands, the most northerly of the Indian Archipelago, embrace an area of about 115,000 square miles, and are bounded on the north and east by the Pacific, on the south by the Celebes and Sooloo (or Mindoro) Seas, and on the west by the China Sea. The group consists of nine larger and over 1,200 smaller islands, most of the latter being hardly more than bare rocks of volcanic origin. The larger islands, exclusive of Palawan, with their area and population, as estimated by Dr. Meyer in 1871, are as follows:

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The total population is variously estimated at from 7,500,000 to 10,000,000.

Climate.

The climate of one region differs considerably from that of another, owing to the great distance covered by the islands, though the general characteristics are everywhere tropical. The northern islands lie in the regions of the typhoons. Three seasons are usually recognized-cold, bot, and wet. The cold extends from November to February or March. The atmosphere is bracing, for the most part clear and sunshine, and woolen garments can be worn with comfort in the mornings. The hot season lasts from March to June, and the heat becomes very oppressive at the approach of the southerly monsoon. During July, August, September, and October the rain comes down in torrents, flooding the lower country. The following meteorological record, kept by the Jesuits during eight years, will give an idea of the temperature and precipitation :

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The “Bulletin de la Société de Géographie Commerciale” (Paris, 1897) says of the industrial condition:

"There are about 25.000 Europeans resident in the islands, of course not counting the troops. Some 12,000 are established in the capital, Manila. English, Spanish, and German houses are engaged in trade, advancing money to the natives on their crops. Such business methods involve risks and necessitate large capital in the beginning, but the profits are immense. The land is fertile and productive, and lacks only intelligent cultivation. Abaca (manila hemp) is one of the chief sources of wealth of the country, Sugar cane does not give as satisfactory returns, owing largely to the ignorance of planters. The average production is 178,000,000 kilograms (175,186.96 tons), while that of Cuba is equal to 720,000,000 kilograms. The sugar goes almost entirely to Japan, England, and the United States. It is of poor quality and very cheap. The cultivation of tobacco is one of the most important industries, although it is capable of much greater development. The native coffee, although not equal to the mocha or bourbon varieties, has a fine aroma. It goes chiefly to Spain. Cocoa trees grow in abundance, and the oil is used for lighting houses and streets. The indigo is famous for its superior qualities. The inhabitants are apathetic to a degree that is noticeable even in these countries, where every one is averse to exertion. The women have long and slender fingers, remarkably fine and sensitive, and well adapted to their work. The hats and cigarette holders they make and the articles they embroider are models of delicacy. Cotton spinning and work in bamboo are among the chief industries."

MINERAL RESOURCES.-The following memorandum is compiled from a recent report of the T'. S. Geological Survey. Only about a score of the islands are known to contain deposits of valuable minerals. Grouped according to the character of the minerals, the distribution is shown below:

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