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thoughts steal over me-hark ! some one when death has most terror-when life enters.”

has some promise of amendment, must The night had fallen, and the large I die?” apartment was wrapt in shade; the fair “ Not so, noble lord,” said Patrick, form of the female, as she sat at the win- “not so do I assist my friends: a gallant dow looking on the portal beneath, and steed waits at the gate, the mountains the mellow light of the moon as it are near, and the shades of night will streamed on her face, presented the idea cover you." of some guardian spirit watching over the Again the Earl pressed his hands destiny of man; the ex-Earl was seated his head, and from the contortions of his near her, looking into her pale and lips, it was manifest a bitter warfare placid face as if to draw from thence raged within him; his friend watched some ray of consolation; the door opened, with impatience, for he knew how preand with a melancholy look a faithful cious time was, that a moment's delay friend, a kinsman of Ossory, stood be- was fraught with danger, and his anxiety fore them.

could not restrain itself.—“Come lord The Earl started on his feet, and after of Ormond,” he said, “the veil of night regarding the countenance of his friend hangs on the mountains and invites you with an inquisitorial glance, sadly asked to its friendly shade-haste."

- Well Patrick, what is next to befal Butler raised his head as he started us? Will your chief still continue our from his meditating posture; his arms protector, or must we again sleep where folded on his breast, his foot advanced, the red deer makes his lair, homeless his keen eye shone with the proud glance wanderers of the sterile hills ?"

of one who felt the mens sibi conscia Patrick stood silent.

recti. “ Patrick," he said slowly and "You bear. ill tidings written too determinedly, “I remain where I am. If plainly on your looks to be mistaken," I fall, better do so by the hand of one who continued Butler; you know I am no has the will but not the power to be a coward, speak the worst.

friend, than the base assassin of a tyrant. The threats of your tyrant have in. I could now find no refuge. I have been fluenced the Earl of Ossory—the bribes tracked by blood-hounds through the were rejected with scorn," mournfully hills, hunted by men no less savage replied the young man.

through the plains, shunned by my fel. Then farewell to you my friend, and lows as if a plague attended me. When bid

your chief farewell for me,” said the dread of my kinsman dismays even Ormond. “I would he had more tourage, his bitterest enemy, your noble chief, or more strength; say I bade God bless where can I expect a refuge!--I remain him."

here, and with my last prayer will I bless “Yet stay my lord,” said Fitz-Patrick, the name of Fitz-Patrick." “I have not told you all; the tyrant A sigh from the Countess now broke threatens to exterminate our name, till in on the conversation, and supplied the not an Ossorian remains to destroy our youth with a good argument to urge the towns till not a stone stands to mark Earl's departure. where a house once stood, unless you are “ Grant, my lord,” he said, " that you delivered into your kinsman's hands, or remain here, and suffer what I know you are put to death within these very your resolute heart would permit, surely walls."

you will not cause one so young, so conThe resolute bravery on the counte- stant and confiding, to be cut off in the nance of Butler changed, he caught his flower of her youth, in the very morning fainting wife to his bosom, as he muttered of her hapless life.”

“ Did your chief say he would ?” The Earl seemed touched : “ You have "He hath plighted bis word to do so.” conquered,” he cried ; " Jead me where

Butler placed his half lifeless wife on thou wilt, for her sake will I suffer more. a couch, and leaned over her inanimate A few moments sufficed to inform the form with his hands pressed against his Countess of their situation, she was soon throbbing temples, in bitter and tear. well wrapt up, and leaning on the arm

A retrospective vision of his of her lord, followed their conductor. sufferings seemed to pass before his The night was dark and stormy; they eyes as he exclaimed

soon arrived beneath a venerable tree, “Then has it at last come to this, which cast its branches over a vast extent after enduring for four long years dan- of ground, and the lofty top was lost in gers, the very name of which men could the dusky clouds. Here stood a strong not hear without a shudder, difficulties horse, well accoutred with a saddle and almost incredible,--must I now perish, pillion, and tied by the reins to the tree;

less woe.

ADVENTURES OF JONATHAN JEFYERSON

WHITLAW.

the Countess was lifted behind, and after NOTES OF A READER.
grasping the hand of the kind youth,
Ormond once more sought safety in flight.

The mind of Broghill, amid his ill. gotten power, was by no means at ease; MRS. TROLLOPE, the authoress of this his conscience eternally reproached him with the injury he indicted on his nephew work, is a woman of some talent, but is and his innocent wife, and his coward often descends to coarseness, which in

loo fond of exaggeration her humour soul was in constant dread lest the friends

one of her sex is unpardonable ; there of the young nobleman should at length

are however, some ludicrous sketches conspire to recover the estates. Within

worth extracting. We subjoin : the once hospitable castle of Kilkenny a sad change had taken place: a rude

A GENUINE AMERICAN CHILD. menial repulsed the stranger at the thresh- “ Early in the month of August 18 hold, spies peeped out of the port-boles one of the noblest and largest steamboats when any person approached, and the ever launched on the Mississippi was tenantry, whom he dealt with hardly, seen to bend gracefully round the proall hated him ; the meanest vassal shut jecting swell of the bank below Mohana his door as he passed by—his equals Creek, and approach the landing-place would not hold converse with him, in front of the store. Young Whitlaw things could not last; and the re-appear- was occupied, at the moment she came ance of the young Earl and Countess was in sight, in poking a long pole into a now hailed with delight.

hole in the bank, in which he fancied he When it was discovered that they had should find some

"crocodile's eggs.' Aed the castle of Ossory, nothing could Struck by her splendid appearance, he equal the wrath of the ambassadors. left his employment, and placing himAfter reproaching the chief in terms self at his accustomed post on the edge which nothing, save their character, of the platform, impatiently awaited her could save from instant death, they de. arrival. Before the steam had been let nounced war against all bearing the name off, or the paddles ceased to play, the of Fitz-Patrick. Instantly the Earl of impatient boy determined to spring on Ormond summoned his adherents, and board, and trusting to his pole, which he advanced into the enemy's country, burn- fixed, as he thought, firmly on the plating and destroying wheresoever he form, he attempted to swing himself into

the vessel-a distance of at least twelve At this critical time, Ormond made feet. So active and well practised were his appearance near the banks of the his young limbs, that it is probable he Nore, and was hailed by all as the legi. would have succeeded, had not the sliptimate chief. The castle was thrown pery log on which he had placed his pole open to him, and, without a shadow of permitted it to give way, at the very opposition, he and his Countess entered moment its firmness was most essential therein.

to his safety, and the instant it sank from Having collected a good body of forces his hand, the adventurous child fell headamong those whom he always knew to long into the water, Above two hunbe faithful to his cause, he fell on his dred persons saw the accident; and the treacherous kinsman in the rear, as he boy's greatest danger now arose from the was fighting the troops of Ossory. The variety and eagerness of the measures tumult instantly attracted the tyrant's put in practice to save him. But it apattention : on seeing what was about to peared that the little fellow never lost take place, for his troops were already his presence of mind for a moment; for, deserting, he turned his horse to fee; without paying the slightest attention to but a blow from Mac Arthy, who fought the contradictory cries of “Hold fast to by his master's side, put an end to his this rope' from one quarter, and · Catch disgraceful life.

by this tub' from another, the bold boy, Lord Ormond was welcomed to his who swam like an otter, deliberately extensive estates with joy, and long and turned from the dangerous projection of happily did he and his lovely Countess the gallery, and marking the moment continue to preside over them, with the when the open gangway approached, same hospitality which marked their sprang upwards, seized its railing, and in ancestors-the dregs of their cup of joy an instant stood unharmed on board the sweetened by the thoughts of the bitterboat. That awful peculiarity of the ness they had previously tasted.

Mississippi river, which causes it to bear J. R. O'FLANAGAN. away whatever sinks beneath its surface,

came,

beyond the reach and power of the most you will allow, a deal more plain-sailing. skilful search that would recover it, is so For, who could Mr. Whitlaw of Mount well known to every inhabitant of the Etna be after leaving all his property region, that the sight of a human being to ?—and he has not that little to make falling into its fatal wave creates a much it a fea-bite. And who could you, stronger sensation than any similar acci. Mr. Croft, devise yours to—which, I dent would do elsewhere. Young Whit- don't question, is pretty considerable law, therefore, was instantly surrounded also-except to us two ? So that's plain by a crowd of anxious and friendly faces. enough. As to the article of residence,

“. A pretty considerable escape you've I'm a right down good American, that's had, my boy!' exclaimed one.

a fact: nevertheless, I would be no Your fate is not drowning, at any ways particular as to accompanying my rate, you young devil,' cried another. wife to England for a spell; and some of

“A famous swimmer you are, and our young family might be left to cheer that's a fact, boy,' observed a third. your old age, Mr. Croft, if you wished

"And a bold heart as ever I see,' it, sir. In short, I take it upon myself observed a fourth.

to assure you that in all things we shall “« Are you not wet to the skin, my be ready and willing to do what's most poor fellow ?" inquired a kind-hearted agreeable to you. As to money down, gentleman, shuddering sympathetically. I guess that the best way will be not to

" And what does it signify if I be?' meddle or make with the Nixton estate replied the boy, with an accent which at all, but just let that come straight at implied more scorn than gratitude. “But, once to my wife, which I shall consider I say,' he continued, fixing his eyes on like one and the same as ready cash ; a very handsome rifle which the com- and I understand that you couldn't be passionate gentleman held in his hand, well off doing that, seeing that it comes

what will you sell that there rifle for?' by the young lady's mother, and ought, The offended philanthropist turned away, therefore, as matter of course and justice, muttering, •Impudent young varment!' to go to her child. There is but one or some such phrase, while a chorus of other point, I expect, that need be menlaughter from those around testified the tioned at present; but that's one on general feeling of admiration excited by which I don't think I should be over the dauntless spirits of the saucy boy." easy to change, and, therefore, it ought

by rights to be done settled, at first

starting. Whenever my wife and I To Mr. Croft, merchant, of Liver goes over to the old country, I never will pool.

suffer nor permit any of my niggers to “Mr. Croft-Sir, I guess that by go across with us, for I know from this, your dreadful beautiful daughter, good authority what comes of it: they as well as yourself, must become to a gets free as soon as they touches that pretty considerable good notion of what queer old place, and devil a bit should I am after. The estate at Nixton is all I ever get 'em back again to Louisiana. very well, and I wouldn't hare any Not doubting that all I propose will objection to buy it; and as to the price, be counted reasonable and handsome, I find there'd be no matter of difficulty I remain, honoured sir, your friend and about the needful. Mount Etna is a son (as would be), profitable bit too, But after all, Mr. “ JONATHAN JEFFERSON WHITLAW. Croft, what is either estate in conse- “ P.S. As I don't see any reason for quenee compared to the real business in wishing for delay, I shall be ready to hand between us? I expect I must perform my part in the happy ceremony explain myself, because 't is in rule so to at the shortest notice. do; though I don't doubt in the least that the beautiful eyes, as have made

DESCRIPTION OF JALAPA. such work with my heart, have been “ SUPPOSE us at Jalapa," says clear-sighted enough to spy out what Latrobe, “a picturesque town situated they have done. The short and the high upon the broken sides of the huge long of it is, then, that I'm in love with mountain-rampart which serves as a base your daughter, Mr. Croft, and that I for the great chain of the eastern branch hereby make a proposal to marry her. of the Cordilleras. A lovelier sight, One good reason why this match is and more beautiful scenery, you need not likely enough to be agreeable to all seek in the torrid zone ! Below you, a parties is, that we are both of us only steep descent leads rapidly down the verchildren ; which makes the business, as dant and fresh slopes, towards the shore

AN AMERICAN LOVE-LETTER.

now

AT AJACCIO.

of the Gulf, which is just visible from We paced along our favourite walk, the highest parts of the town, at the We paced in silence, broken-hearted; distance of twenty leagues and upwards. We could but weep—we durst not talk, Above you rises ridge above ridge, And thus we parted. crowned by the Coffre de Perote, and yet farther to the southward, by the O! grief can give the blight of years magnificent snow.covered summit of The stony impress of the dead : Orizava, in comparison to whose sublime We looked farewell through blighting and majestic stature, the elevated moun

tears, tains which cluster round its feet, appear And then Hope fled. but as pigmies. To the right and left,

Athenæum. extending along the mountains' sides, at the height of between four and five thou- THE FAMILY MANSION OF sand feet above the sea, lies a delicious THE BUONAPARTES, and salubrious region, covered with magnificent forests, and diversified with some of the most beautiful towns in New ( Translated from the French.) Spain ; a country, smiling with an eternal spring, under the kindly influence of “ The house of the Buonapartes, at Ajacthe heavy mists and dews, which, rising cio, was the handsomest edifice in that thus midway up the steep Cordillera town ; for the Buonapartes do not date from the bosom of the Gulf, pause here from Napoleon, notwithstanding all that in mid-air, and promote that rich ver- has been asserted by the enemies of the dure, which is equally grateful to the in- name. The family was one of the oldest, habitants of the arid and sterile table- most considerable, and illustrious of the land, or of fervid sands of the sea-board. country, even before it had been distin

“ To this city of refuge' flies the guished from the other patrician races of unacclimated European from the port Corsica by the splendour of an imperial below, as soon as that dreaded sickness, throne. Its nobility is traced up to a the vomiti prieto makes its annual appear- period in which it is hidden by the darkance within the narrow walls-forgetting ness of time. They show in the archives the thirst of gain, in sudden solicitude of Ajaccio a register, by which the to preserve dear life. To this point, the popular opinion on this point is confirmed. moment he lands, the panting traveller It is a record of a city meeting, which presses up the steep mountains with dates from the thirteenth century. At might and main ; and blesses God when that time, the people were neither Gehe feels the fresh air of the mountains, noese nor French, but true Corsicans, and sees the white walls of the convent strenuously asserting their independence of San Francisco crowning the steep: against the aggressions of the former. and here the inhabitant of the table-land, At this meeting, twelve lords were choor the departing stranger, pauses and sen by the people to command the militia lingers, ere he descend into the infected there were three Buonapartes among Tierra Caliente, and ventures to inhale these select men." the hot and subtile breath of fever and Thus spoke the Signor Berettoni, as disease."

we were sailing through the beautiful

gulf of Ajaccio, and cast anchor before A PARTING HOUR.

that city, which rises from the shore like BY THE LATE MRS. FLETCHER. an amphitheatre. Here everything is

Italian, the sky, the climate, the fruits I sate with one I love last night, and flowers; and more especially the inShe played to me an olden strain :

habitants. In other days it brought delight

“ Look at those delightful houses! Is Last night, but pain.

not our Ajaccio a fine town ?”

“ Most assuredly! but the house of Last night I watched the stars arise, houses, that which we have made a pilBut clouds soon dimmed the ether grimage expressly to visit, the most reblue;

markable of its houses, where is that?" I turned and sought their sister eyes, “ I understand you-let us leave the Clouds dimmed them too.

quay, and follow this winding and nar

row street Yet all around was bright and calm, Signor Berettoni was like all his coun

Was calm and beautiful as ever ; trymen ; once mention to him the name We saw but could not feel the balm of Napoleon, to flatter his national pride,

Can those who sever?

to you.

which is a species of self-love, and you just left that city, it no doubt looks odd can get him to do anything. So he un

It was, however, in the newest dertook to be our pilot through the streets and best taste in 1818, and I bought of the Corsican capital.

it myself there, when I formed one of a “ All that you have just seen,” said my deputation, to which honour I was called guide, as we quitted the vast avenue of by the confidence of my fellow-citizens, the quay, “was not in existence fifty and perhaps by the unconscious spell years ago; and when France sent her which is reflected by an illustrious name. first governor to the island, the house we An emperor's uncle may speak of being are now going to visit was the best in the a deputy, without being looked upon as town; the family which inhabited it a boaster." you know that family, of course ?”

We were amused by his discourse, “What! the Buonaparte family?” which we took care not to interrupt.

“ Look straight forward-that build- “I perceive your impatience,” said he, ing is its mansion."

compressing his lips, as if to hide an This annunciation roused us suddenly ironical smile. “ You are all anxiety to from meditative ecstasy, into which we see my curiosities and antiquities ! But had been plunged by the glorious asso- if you will have the kindness to walk ciations necessarily connected with the still higher up stairs, you shall have a name of Napoleon, and by the spot sight of them by-and-by." whither we had come. General B., General B. could scarcely contain his who accompanied us on this historical wrath at hearing this careless indifferpilgrimage, could scarcely breathe, so ence, and almost disdainful allusion to strongly was he agitated.

circumstances which the veteran impe“What! that yellow house, with rial trooper regarded with fanaticism, newly-painted green jalousies ?”

and any scorn of which he considered a “ Yes, that is it. Three stories high, sacrilege. The old man did not notice and four windows to each story, was

his looks and went on : quite a Corsican palace in 1768. The “ In the meantime, this was the apartpresent proprietor of this illustrious ment of my very august and gracious relic is a respectable old gentleman, the sister, her majesty the empress mother : only member of the family resident on a generation of kings was born, played the island. He is very attentive and and grew up here; and the greater porcivil to strangers and visitors, and will tion of Europe was furnished with sovereceive you most cordially ; only he is reigns from this little room. Talking always much surprised at the eagerness of rooms, this is the one where the most and enthusiasm of those who come to famous of the brothers passed his infancy, see his house, and can scarcely understand and here he lived and slept until the the importance attached to the chamber governor's kind interest and patronage where a person was born to whom he procured his reception at the military was uncle.”

academy at Brienne. Will you now At this moment the old gentleman walk up stairs ?" walked out of his house. He listened We entered the garret. Do not be to our request, for permission to see the scandalized ; a year or two later I saw mansion, with a courteous benevolence the costly and gorgeous cradle of the of tone and look, and volunteered his king of Rome, put out of sight in services as our guide. Old General B. another garret of the arch-ducal palace could scarcely believe his eyes; he actu- of Marie Louise, at Parma. ally trembled with emotion; for, I believe, “Stop,” said the old gentleman; “look the first time in his life, tears trickled at that old chair, and that walnut-tree down his cheeks, and showed the nature table. He used to sit in that chair, and of the feelings by which he was in- it was at that table that he learned his fluenced.

A BC. There is some difference between We entered the house with that species these worm - eaten articles and the of religious veneration, with which one gilded furniture of his cabinet at the is impressed on the threshold of a tem. Tuileries." ple; we were about to inspect and touch The general respectfully kissed 'this with our hands the cradle of the greatest table, or rather its remains, for it was man of modern times.

mutilated and cut in such a manner that “I have to apologize, gentlemen, for it could hardly stand upright. the form and fashion of my furniture, “ You see that my visitors leave their which is, no doubt, different from that marks behind them,” remarked the pronow in vogue at Paris, and, as you have prietor of the house, with a sneer which

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