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THE SPANISH GRANDEE OF THE NINE- his own particular town or city, with a TEENTH CENTURY.

selected stock of all that is new through"A stranger cannot fail to be amused out the empire. with the external marks of respect still To give you some idea of the extent of shewn to this high-born race. When this trade, I may mention, that besides his excellency' condescends lo honour a music and maps, there are rarely fewer ball or soirée with his presence, three than three thousand new works brought strokes of the porter's bell announces out at each fair. The wagons of printed that a grandee is coming up stairs. The paper, which enter and leave this mart lacqueys bandy the name from one to the of the brain, exceed in number an Indian other, until it reaches the drawing-room, caravan. Only think of the statement mangled, doubtless, by the mouths by Dr. Menzel, that there are at least through which it has passed, but still ten millions of new volumes printed historic. Its owner is beard rustling annually in Germany! Of the extent along the carpet in the next room ; the of authorship in this country, you may eye of expectation directs its range some also form some notion when I tell you, six feet above the floor, so as to fall full that each half year's Leipsic catalogue, upon the face of this man of history; numbers at least a thousand new writers; but it fails to encounter the desired ob. hence it may fairly be inferred, that at ject. There is, however, a bowing, and the present moment there cannot be scraping, ; and muttering of words of fewer than fifty thousand persons living compliment, half pronounced and hurried in Germany who have written a book! over, going on about eighteen inches If authorship goes on in a similarly probelow the proposed mark. Positively gressive ratio to that which it has lately the lion must be in the room. Can it done, it may be fairly assumed, that in be that fattish, jolly little figure, with a few years the names of German aularge unmeaning eyes, and crisped and thors will exceed the number of living awkward manner, which is shuffling German readers. The mass of books, about the room, and grinning and bow- which increases every day, already baffles ing to different persons in the circle ? all calculation ; and when we think of Alas! too surely this is one of the heir. its extent, we are lost in astonishment looms of his country. With the differ- at this new wonder of the world, which ence of greater or less embonpoint in each has been conjured into existence by the individual, this portrait represents, pretty pen and the printing-press. The Gerfairly, the external physical erdowments man booksellers, when they do not reof the great majority of the grandees, pair to the two fairs themselves, invariwith, probably, not more than five or ably transmit their works for subscripsix favoured exceptions. Their intel. tion through their agents in this city. lectual powers and acquirements are The books thus sent for sale, remain pretty much on the same scale. The here a twelvemonth and a day, after very few who possess superficial know- which the remainders, which means the ledge, a smattering on some conimon- unsold, are sent back to their respective place subject, affix enormous pretensions publishers. to superior instruction. Madrid in 1835.

AN ARMENIAN WEDDING.

“ We went about eight o'clock in the BOOK FAIR AT LEIPSIC.

evening, and found the house lighted up, In the commerce of Leipsic, there is and full of the lady's friends, among nothing

so extraordinary as its trade in whom were the priest who was to perform books. The fact is, this city is the grand the service, and his wife, both very plain and sole emporium of the literature of and simple looking persons. We passed Germany. At one period, Frankfort through several ante-rooms full of peocould boast of possessing some portion of ple, and were finally ushered into an the book trade; but it may now be justly inner and secluded chamber round which said, that Leipsic has got the entire was a divan.

On this sat cross-legged a monopoly of it. At the two great fairs, number of Armenian ladies, two or three the booksellers congregate from every deep, and at the far corner was a moquarter of Germany, each bringing tionless figure, like a bust in a niche, along with him the books he purposes to covered with a rich veil, glittering with publish to the world. Here the pub- gold, which bung down on all sides, so lications of one publisher are exchanged as entirely to conceal her figure beneath or bartered for those of another; and at it. The bust was the bride. Across the close of every fair, each returns to the room was a line of men, two or three

VON RAUMER IS THUS DESCRIBED BY A

TOURIST.

deep, who stood gazing on hier in silence. swaddling clothes, when the husband In compliment to our Frank customs, saw her for the first time, and the final chairs were procured for us in the neigh- ceremony was performed.” bourhood, on which we sat, and continued gazing on her in silence in the same way. To gratify us, the bride permitted her veil to be raised a little; it was instantly dropped again; but the “Of the many literary men who reside glimpse we had, shewed us a slight figure in Berlin, and of the few justly entitled to and pale face, with a countenance ex- a European reputation, I cannot resist ceedingly pensive and joyless. Her com- mentioning with respect, the learned and panions, however, were of a different able historian of the Family of the character. They were all unveiled, and Hohenstauffen, Frederick Von Raumer. displayed faces radiant with beauty and ** The unwearied industry and indefacheerfulness. Some of them were ex- tigable perseverance which Von Raumer ceedingly lovely, crowned with coronets bestowed in collecting materials, and in of gold, and their long hair floated about examining documents to enable him to them in extraordinary profusion down write this truly Ghibeline history, have to the divan, like the veil of the bride. won for him the highest esteem and apThough seemingly in high spirits, plause from all who can value such purthey spoke in whispers, and all their suits; and they afford another proof, motions were tempered by gentleness and among many, of the peculiarly characmodesty.

teristic qualities of the German mind for “ After some refreshments and music, the investigation and elucidation of an open space was cleared before the truth. Von Raumer is about forty-five bride, on which two embroidered mats years of age, of short stature, with a were laid. On them were placed two countenance which bespeaks thoughtfulenormous candlesticks, containing wax ness rather than genius. There is a tapers of a proportionable size, and be- soberness of demeanour about him inditween them was a third, of still greater cating a philosophical rather than an magnitude, without a stand, but bound imaginative disposition, though his clear upright to the other two by ribbons. grey eye at once marks the sharp and This mysterious emblem was called the inquisitive turn of his intellect. The nuptial taper.' It represented ihe maiden acute, industrious qualities of Von Raustate of the girl, and was to burn till mer's mind, having early attracted the that state expired. It was then extin. attention of Von Hardenberg, he was guished, and kept as a relic by the family. employed by that well-known Prussian The snuff of the wick became the per minister in his own private cabinet, and quisite of the priest, who attributed to had the honour of assisting the reformit many conjugal virtues.

ing statesman in working out the details “ The priest was now called on to of some of his most important and perform another important ceremony. ameliorating measures. There, he beA low table was placed near the nuptial came acquainted with the practical taper, covered with a white cloth. The working of courts, a circumstance which priest took from his bosom a small cruci. no doubt proved most useful to him in fix, and waving it several times in the his after historical researches. Von air over the table, he uttered a benedic. Raumer ultimately left Berlin, but has tion, and concluded with a psalm. again returned to it, and is now one of

“We were curious to see what mystery the Board of Censors, a situation which, was under this cloth. It was slowly from his liberal opinions, and from the lifted up, and there appeared a rich present unpopular nature of the office, shawl, which was taken up and wrapped I should think can be no great pleaabout the bride. This ceremony was sure to him. It is in fact slyly hinted, deemed one of the most important parts of that he himself is secretly opposed to the marriage service, and is called . Bless- the censorship, and though strictly a ing the nuptial shawl.'

conservatist, is not blind to the folly of " When these and other rites were first training a people by education for over, we expected to see the bridegroom, free discussion, and poisoning or dambut he never appeared. He was down ming back the sources from which they in Galata, enjoying himself with his are to derive the materials for thought friends; nor was it till the end of three and study.” days that the bride was carried to him wrapped up in a shawl, like a child in

ROMAN ANECDOTE.

TRANSLATED FROM THE FRENCH.

are all that I want, and two rooms will Publius Piso, the rhetorician, unwill. suffice me; I should feel ashamed of ing to be disturbed by much talk, com.

tiring so many people by waiting on me.” manded his servants to answer such

And he retired to a contemptible little questions only as he asked them, and to house in the Rue de Tournon, the Hotel say no more. Having a design to give de Lesdiguières, where Louis XV. exan entertainment to Clodius the chief perienced no little trouble in visiting magistrate, he ordered him to be invited him. It was not one of the least events and a sumptuous banquet to be provided. in the life of Peter, to have attracted the On the day appointed, several other noble and handsome Louis to a dirty guests appeared; they only waited for hotel near the Luxembourg.

There Clodius. Piso beginning to grow im- might be seen the royal but robust patient, sent one of his servants several sailor taking the young king in his arms times to know whether he would come without any ceremony, and carrying him or not.

It grew late, and Piso lost all up to his humble chamber, exclaiming, temper. “ Did you call on him ?” ex. "I am carrying France in my arms!" claimed he at last. " Yes,"

Why

This was all very well; but not long then does he not come ?”—“He told me after, this emperor, who wished for he could not come. '_"Why did you not nothing but a little bread and beer, and tell me so at first ?”—“ Because, sir, you

felt contented in so humble an abode, never asked me the question.”

caused his gardens at Peterhof to be finished according to the models of Le

Nộtre. I am not sure if Le Nôtre him. THE FÊTE OF PETERHOF.

self did not lay out the gardens; and the Czar instituted fêtes at this imperial Versailles at which Louis XIV. him.

self would not have blushed. (For the Parterre.)

· Peter the Great I believe, celebrated

his own fête every year at Peterhof; PETERHOF owes its existence to Peter the Emperor Alexander held that of the the Great; for in Russia every thing is empress mother here, and it is bere also either the work of the great Peter that the present emperor assembles all Alexiowitz, or the accomplishment of his court on the first of July, the fête of his ideas. No sooner has your foot his wife the Empress Alexandra Feodotouched the land of Russia, than Peter rowna; who is justly styled the mother the Great appears to you. He moulded of Russia. this earth, and shaped it into palaces ; The eve of the preceding day saw us he dug this gulf and dammed in its on our journey, between two long files waters by dykes; he called them from of carriages with four horses harnessed beneath the distant rocks where they in a line, and driven by grave, bearded slumbered; he rendered this soil firm, coachman, closely enveloped in their drained these marshes, transplanted these blue caftans. We passed beneath a productions from Europe, and these handsome triumphal arch of bronze, different races of animals which feed on covered with statues of Russian soldiers them; and even the race of men who in their ancient national costume, and enjoy all this in the bosom of a civilized cased in armour, as they formerly were. and social statethey also are his work! The heavens were clouded, and tempests Whenever you see a beautiful tree, which mingled with rain, which constantly rise is neither a fir nor a pine, you may say, from the gulf, made the weather look that is a gift of Peter the Great. At very threatening. Our horses proceedPeterhof, every oak and every lime tree ed with a rapidity unknown to us.

On which lends its shade, so necessary at both sides of the road, the whole way, this season of the year, has been planted were villas, Jakes, parks, and elegant by that hand which did every thing, pavilions; and there passed by at a

It was not till after his return from still more rapid pace than we did, light Paris that Peter the Great adorned droskis drawn by one horse, wourskts in Peterhof with its park and waters, which which were seated officers, whose 'grey resemble somewhat those of Marly and cloaks and white plumes waving in the Versailles. When the regent wished wind floated onwards like a cloud ; the Peter to take up his abode in the Louvre, télègues with three horses adorned with where he had prepared a reception for bells carrying a feld-jaeger ; and hardly him worthy of the regency, the Emperor could our eyes rest, even for a moment, replied, “I am a soldier, bread and beer on the magnificent country, houses of

Count Zawadowsky, on the gardens of for the grand one, which does not take the grand forester Narischkin, or the place till the next day. beautiful villa of Count Sckeremetief, In the castle of Peterhof the French who among his serfs numbers some of and Russian style of architecture mingle ; the richest men in the country, and pos- the façade, in the already corrupted style sesses himself 60,0001. per annum*; for of Louis XIV.'s reign, is surmounted we may here remark, that in Russia with gilded cupolas. The waters of the many of the slaves are richer than their Lake Ladoga have been turned into masters.

showers, bouquets, stars, and wheatWe advanced towards Peterhof in the sheaves; the bronze Tritons and marble midst of the coachmen's and postilions' Nereides of the grand siècle, have taken cries of Padi! and Paschol! which they possession of the banks of the Gulf of make use of to disperse the crowds of Finland. Finland peasants who are slowly travel- Versailles has, like two rings on its ing towards the city, lying on their carts fingers, the great and little Trianon ; of pine wood. You soon reach Strellna, Peterhof has Monplaisir and Alexandria. the beautiful but now deserted house of Monplaisir is a small brick house on the the Grand Duke Constantine; then the sea-shore; it is the hôtel de Lesdiguières, convent of Saint Jerga with its towers; which Peter reserved, in order there to and then the sea, which bathes a plain so eat in peace his black bread and to drink verdant that you might almost fancy you his beer, like an old soldier as he was, saw the Adriatic washing the shores of the when he was tired of the Louvre which Gulf of Venice. And the whole length he had built for himself. of the road, upon terraces overshadowed They preserve here with religious care with trees, you will perceive the most some of Peter the Great's clothes, the elegant women, with a short light cloak of Vidercomes in Dutch crockery ware, the ermine thrown over their shoulders be- pewter plates which he used, and the cause the evening is closing in, their rough wooden chairs' and narrow hard black hair carefully tressed, and the fore- bedstead on which he rested ; but what head crossed by a gold chain from which gave him the greatest pleasure was, that hangs a diamond or pearl; and beneath the from this spot he had a full view of his terrace are the servants, their heads en- fleet without even the trouble of moving veloped in a long Moscow shawl, listen- off his seat. ing to the sweet but sorrowful lays of A fête at the court of Russia can only the moujiks, with their long hair, like begin by a military solemnity. This females, light beards, and perfectly regu- commenced by a review of the horse lar features of so singular an expression. guards, who ackpowledge the empress as

At length we arrive, I can hardly tell their chief, who, with the grand duchesses whether, at Peterhof, Aleppo, or Bagdad her daughters dressed in the most elegant —the clock is striking eleven, and the Parisian style, in a superb catéche harheavens have become perfectly brilliant, nessed in ail the perfection of English for at this season of the year in Russia taste, herself reviewed her guards. The there is no night. The sky becomes emperor stood at the carriage door with clearer still, shade above disappears, and his hand respectfully raised to his cap, the objects appear detached in a sort of performing the office of lieutenant-colonel mezzotinto which is formed generally to the empress, and proposing some probetween them and the back-ground of motions to her, which you may easily the atmosphere. This light streams over believe were granted most readily. the cupolas and gilded minarets of Peter- After witnessing the curious evolutions hof: the Tscherkasses' horsemen, girded of the cavalry composed of the mounwith their oriental arms, their neck and taineers of Caucasus, the emperor and shoulders covered with a coat of mail, empress received in their palace the moving in all directions the camp of foreigners who had not yet been prethe young and noble cadets surrounds sented. I am afraid I shall find it rather the slobode; another camp, a complete difficult to describe how this evening was Tartar one, formed of coaches and wagons, spent in the palace. Imagine the whole covers the other part of the plain; and population of Petersburg transported to the illusion would be complete if the Peterhof; the long avenues, and green joyous west did not betray itself, by airs lawns of the Russian Versailles covered from the Muette de Portici, and Musard's with merchants, their wives and children ; quadrilles, which are heard resounding and among the trees and the immense through the château, where the emperor trellis work raised for this vast illuminagives a small family ball, while waiting tion, the largest in the world, you may perceive thousands of black and light beards; ball is over, and then commences the sparkling eyes, faees from every climate, drive: every one enters their carriage, and costumes of all the jurisdiction of which is composed of two long seats Russia, that is to say of Europe, Asia, placed on four wheels, back to back, and America; and the truth must be ayd drawn by two gigantic horses; four told, a vast multitude also from Finland, seat themselves on one side, and four on who rival the Laplanders and Kamschat, the other. The Emperor opens the dale's in that filth, which is now almost procession in his caliche. All the rest, exploded by civilization from the rest of ambassadors, ministers, ladies of honour, the empire.

and generals, place themselves pêle-mêle It is for such guests that the Emperor in these carriages, called lignes, which and his court are clothed in their richest dart like arrows through hedges formed dresses. Etiquette regulates the cos- of the people, sailors, lamps, and elm tumes, the sword was rigorously forbid. trees, across the immense gardens of den, and every one wore a short cloak of Peterhof. black lace called a Venetian, over the .: I dare not essay to paint the effect of shoulder. The ladies sparkling with the illuminations, some seeming to touch diamonds, the ministers and ambassadors the clouds, others placed on the surface superbly dressed, the chamberlain and of the basins, and even under the very gentlemen of the bed chamber all in, çascades ; some like liquid fire, dazzling uniform, are assembled in the saloon of and sparkling ; the variety of handsome Bronze Portraits, which precedes the uniforms covered with gold and silver, Emperor's private apartment, when sud- passing beneath these brilliant lights, the denly the guards, stationed at each door, crowds of sailors assembled to the numopen at the same time that of the Em- ber of five thousand to light these gardens, peror's apartment, and the opposite one, numbers of Tartars, Finlanders, Musand the Emperor courageously enters the sulmen and Russians collected by this neighbouring saloons : I think I might say fête; women most elegantly dressed; and the neighbouring streets, for 10,000 mou- above all, the order and reserve, perhaps jiks, peasants, &c., dirty, banded, and in rather too respectful, adds also to the rags, exhaling the odours of oil and garlic, singularity of the scene. On one side enveloped in spite of the overwhelming the palace resplendent with light, whose heat in their sheepskins, and booted to gilded domes reflect all the fires of the the knee in greasy boots, await, in these park ;-the palace, the crowd, and the saloons, the brilliant, the elegant, the merry music; on the other in the disrefined court of Russia. Happy he who tance, the sea in all its sombre majesty; finds himself in the midst of a group of its profound silence and its undisturbed grave merchants in their long caftans, darkness ! and with their beards carefully combed ; This short night was in fact the first but, alas ! you are often forced to take they had had at Petersburg for two your place between two iswoschniks, fil- months, and it seemed, like the warm thy drivers, always intoxicated, although and lovely day which had preceded it, silent; or near a dwornick, the unfortu. to have been made on purpose for this nate porter, who passes the night be. fête. At this season, night like day appeath the threshold of the door, pears instantaneously; in a moment the wrapped in his oily cloak, which he inces. morning light completely inundated us, santly rubs against you ; and ile you extinguished the illuminations, and are groaning, and trying to get away, shewed us the sun, just as we were rethe Emperor, calm, free, and as much turning before the colonnade .of the at his ease as if he were in the midst of palace, surrounded by a picturesque corhis court, passes through at the head of tège of horsemen from every regiment the Polonaise dance, this multitude, whom of the guards, and the Tscherkasses with he overtops considerably, neither appear their shining armour and coats mail ing to perceive the heat, nor the vapour of the eleventh century. The fête was which rises in the midst of his guests. over,' And what a fête !

The ball commenced at eight, at eleven The following day every thing had the Emperor was still in the saloon. disappeared, and the Emperor, who does

At Peterhof there is but one piece of not inhabit the palace, but a simple cottapestry. It is of the manufacture of tage on the sea shore, had returned home the Gobelins, and a present from France. with his wife. I cannot find a better It is Steuben's picture, in which he has expression to give you an idea of the represented Peter the Great in a boat citizen-like life that the Emperor leads beaten by the storm.

at Alexandria. At length, heaven be praised ! the

M. A. W.

LONDON: Published by Effingham Wilson, Junior, 16, King William Street, London Bridge, Where communications for the Editor (post paid) will be received.

(Printed by Manning and Smithson, Ivy Lane.)

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