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man's grave.

!

these sad spectacles : and it struck me I picked up my blue handkerchief at the
was about to learn what an expression dance of Areneberg, and brought it back
death wore on the features of a sentenced to me. When shall I see you again?
man. I followed the captain. The That which gives me most pleasure, is to
regiment was formed into a hollow hear that you are esteemed by your
square; behind the second line, and superiors, and loved by others. But
upon the edge of the wood, some soldiers you have yet two years to serve : make
were digging a trench. They were com- haste about it, because then we will get
manded by a lieutenant, for all regi- married.
mental duty is conducted with order, and

“ Adieu, my dearest friend, a certain discipline is necessary to dig a

« THINE Own MARIE.

« P. S.-Endeavour to send me, too, In the centre of the square, eight something from France, not for fear officers were seated upon drums; the that I should forget you, but that I may ninth, to the right and a little in advance, always have it about me. You will be wrote a few words, supporting the paper stow a kiss upon whatever you send me, upon his knees, but very negligently, and I am quite sure that I shall afterand only as it seemed that a man might wards find out the place of your kiss.” not be put to death without some little When the perusal of the letter was form.

finished, Piter again spoke: Arnold,” The accused was summoned. He was said he, “placed this letter in my hands a young man of elevated stature, with a yesterday evening, as they gave me my noble and wild cast of countenance. lodging billet. I could not sleep the Along with him advanced a woman, the whole night; I thought of my country, sole witness whose deposition was taken and Marie. She desired me to send her in this affair.

something from France ; had no And when the Colonel was about to money; I had forestalled my pay for three interrogate the woman, “ It is useless," months to come, for my brother and exclaimed the soldier, “I am going to cousin, who are gone home these several avow everything; I stole a handkerchief days back. This morning, on rising to from this woman's house."

begin our march, I opened my window : Colonel." You, Piter! your cha- a blue handkerchief was hanging on a racter has hitherto stood high in the line below it-- I had the folly to take it, regiment ? "

and I thrust it into my knapsack; I Piter. " True, Colonel, I have descended into the street; I then realways endeavoured to merit the appro- pented what I had done, and was going bation of my officers. In this case it back to the house, when this woman ran was not for myself that I committed the up to me. The handkerchief was found, theft ; it was for Marie.”

and that's the whole truth. The article Colonel." Who is this Marie?” of war ordains that I should be shot

Piter._" It is Marie who lives there shoot me, but do not despise me.” away—in the country-near Areneberg The judges could not conceal their -where that great apple tree is—I shall emotion ; however, on collecting their never see her again!”

votes, he was unanimously condemned Colonel._“I do not comprehend you, to death. He heard the sentence with Piter ; explain yourself.”.

perfect sang-froid ; then advancing toPiter.

:-“ Ah well, Colonel, read that wards his captain, he requested from him letter;" and be handed to him the follow- the loan of four francs. The captain ing letter, every word of which is fresh gave them to him. I then saw him apin my remembrance.

proach the woman to whom the blue “My dearest friend Piter

handkerchief had been restored, and “I profit by the occasion of the re. address her in these words—"Madame, cruit Arnold enlisting in your regiment here are four francs; I know not whether to send these lines, and a silk purse, your handkerchief is worth inore than which I have knitted expressly for you. that sum, but should it be so, I pay I had great trouble to prevent my father dear enough for it otherwise for you to from seeing me whilst about it, for he excuse me the rest." always scolds me for loving you so much, Then taking back the handkerchief, and says that you will never return. he kissed it, and gave it to his officer. You will come back to me, will you not ? My captain," said he, “in two years At all events, if you never return, I hence you will return to our mountains ; should love you notwithstanding. I pro- if you pass on the side near Areneberg, mised you my hand the day when you ask for Marie, put into her hands this

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SIR PHILIP SIDNEY.

blue handkerchief, but do not tell her better nature; of the treasures of past the price at which I bought it.”

intellect, and the full grandeur and rain. He then knelt down, offered up a bow splendour of human hopes. It is prayer to his Maker, and walked with a this spirit that is continually lifting us firm step to receive his sentence.

out of the clay.of the earth-out of the I withdrew myself from the spot, and grossness of our animal condition, to a entered the wood, that I might not wito preception of wider · views, intenser ness the termination of that cruel tragedy. being, more generous, glowing and The report of a volley soon taught me ethereal aspirations. It is like that that all was over.

suffusion of purple and violet light cast I returned about an hour afterwards ; down from the evening sun over the the regiment was far away, all was, quiet, mountains, which, however beautiful in but on following the edge of the wood themselves, derive a tenfold and heavenly to regain my route, I perceived a few beauty from it. It is not so much a paces before me traces of blood, and a part of ourselves, as the spirit of an plot of earth fresh dug. I took a branch eternal and divine world, which moulds of fir, made a kind of rude cross, and and incorporates us, into itself, and placed it over the grave of poor Piter, changes us from what we are to what now forgotten by, all else in the world, we are to be. Let no man fall into the except myself and perhaps Marie. 1. grievous mistake that poetry only lives

verse nor that it is confined to

language at all. It is a far and widely OBSOLETE AUTHORS.

diffused spirit, and lives in all human There are beyond doubt many rich affluence that we imagine. It cannot

hearts, more or less, and often in greater thoughts and noble sentiments enshrined always throw itself into language. in the works of divers writers, whose names are now forgotten and their works neglected. We sometimes encounter them in our desultory and miscellaneous been struck off in one sentence by Cole

The character of this gallant man has reading, and are frequently lost in admi- ridge to greater effect than if he had ration of the happy vein they discover, employed a' volume to elaborate the and the high and lofty mood of their portrait; he calls himoccasional strain. There was one Fleck

“ The paramount gentleman of Eu: noe, in the time of Dryden, who perpetrated sundry absurdities in prose and rope; the soldier, scholar, and statesman

e-England's Sir Philip Sidney." verse, in the mass of which dullness pre- His “ Defence of Poesy” is one of dominates, but through which, ever and the noblest monuments of that age; it anon, a bright fancy irradiates the sur

is “ the sweet food of sweetly uttered rounding darkness, and forces us to ex- knowledge,” and when he wrote he claim, o si sic omnia. In his “Invoca- looked into his own heart. We cannot tion to Silence,” he calls it

resist quoting his personification of a “ Frost of the mouth, thaw of the mind, Admiration's readiest tongue.”

poet :

• The poet is the true popular phiThe same writer pays a fine and re- losopher. His discourse carries an appaspectful compliment to the fair

rent shining. He cometh to you with “ There are ladies, in whose conversation, words set in delightful proportion, either as in an academy of virtue, I learned nothing accompanied with, or prepared for, the one might as well be drunk in a crystal foun. well-enchanting skill of music; and tain, as have any evil thought while in their with a tale, forsooth, he cometh unto company.

you with a tale, which holdeth children
from play, and old men from the chim-

ney-corner. I never heard the old song What is poetry? It is not merely of Percy and Douglas, that I found not the melody of verse, or the spirit of my heart moved more than with a trumpassion and emotion embodied in verse. pet; and yet it was sung but hy some It is a revelation from heaven of its own blind minstrel, with no rougher voice beauty and glory; an atmosphere of than rude style; which being so evilheaven breathed down and diffused apparelled in the dust and cobweb of through our grosser one, by which we that uncivil age, what would it work, become sensible of the strength of joy in trimmed in the gorgeous eloquence of the heart, of the moral greatness of our Pindar ?"

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POETRY

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LONDON:
Published by Efingham Wilson, Junior, 16, King William Strect, London Bridge.

Where communications for the Editor (post paid) will be received.

(Printed by Manning and Smithson, Ivy Lane.)

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OF FICTION, POETRY, HISTORY, AND GENERAL LITERATURE, No. 116. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1836. Price Two-Pence,

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ness.

THE MORTAR AND THE amusing air of self-satisfaction at the PESTLE.

aspect of all these deformed creations,

the children of his grotesque genius. AN HISTORIETTE, FROM THE ITALIAN OF This man however had accomplished GABRIEL DE MOYRIA. a chef-d'æuvre; yes, a chef d'æuvre of

correctness, elegance, and virgin sweet(For the Parterre).

Figure to yourself a charming

head, the lovely proportions of which Ar Florence the Beautiful, under the were half concealed by a profusion of pontificate of Leo X, there dwelt a natural ringlets, and placed with infinite statuary unknown to fame; one of those grace upon shoulders that Praxiteles infatuated modellers, calling themselves would not have disavowed. The Greek artists merely because they possess an profile, altered only by the slight curving unhappy facility in chipping to pieces a of the Roman nose ; eyes neither large block of marble, and of spoiling te nor small, but admirably cut, and whose ideal of a beauteous form by the awkward- soft expression revealed a heart already ness of their imitation. His workshop pre-occupied with love; a pretty mouth, presented a mélange of strange and som- about which played that roguish smile bre forms, confusedly scattered around. indicative of an ingenuous mind allied to A Madonna (which was not the “Mary innocent mischief; a sylph-like form, full of grace,") by the side of a gigantic whose delicate proportions and harmoniApollo, with lanky, dislocated and con- ous contours undulated beneath the gentused limbs; a skeleton saint behind a tle pressure of a tunic reaching far short fat and wry-faced Venus ; little puffy- of ankles that terminated in the prettiest cheeked angels, grouped round a hideous little feet to be met with in all Italy. satyr: and there, in veritable flesh and This chef-d'æuvre was not cold and bone, our clipper of marble reared him- inert like the pale and ridiculous phan. self aloft, strutting about with a most toms that peopled his dwelling. It

breathed; it had a soul. It was Nisida, One day Julio passed before the the daughter of the statuary, seventeen dwelling of Nisida. He rapidly suryears old, gentle and piquante, frolic- veys it, he espies her alone in the worksome yet simple-minded, reuniting, in shop. He enters to snatch the hurried fine, all that attracts the attention, amuses pressure of her hand, and then quickly the mind, and captivates the heart. withdraw himself, when he is surprised

The élite of the Florentine youth by the father, who in a terrible voice flocked to the studio of her father. It inquires : “What are you doing here?" was who should obtain a glance, a smile, Under such circumstances, this quesa word, even a frown, for every thing tion, perfectly simple as it is, becomes she did possessed an irresistible charm. embarrassing; the young man, after Could she escape, among so many be- having reflected for a moment, thought wildering seductions, being taken in himself exceedingly ingenious by making the snares of these desecrators of beauty this reply : “ Messere, be not angry; who praise only to corrupt! Against am commissioned by my mother to buy all these, be assured, love proves the best her a mortar, and knowing you to be a safeguard. If Nisida appeared to enjoy most skilful artist, I come to beg that her triumph and seek even to prolong it, you will make me one." it was no more than a trick of feminine The wave raised by the eruption of a coquetry : her heart was no longer her volcano, boils not quicker than did the own-she had bestowed it on Julio, wrath of the statuary when he heard a youth, single-minded, timid, poor these words: “ Darest thou 'insult me as herself, but very handsome, sincere, thus !” cried he, “ request me to make and ardently loving her. She too loved a mortar! I, who create gods! insohim with all the fervour, all the effusion lence unparalleled !" Then, seizing the of a first sentiment, and for him would unfortunate Julio by the collar, he have given, without regret, the congé to added : :-"Look, see'st thou, opposite the whole swarm of those high-born my house, that wretched shop? Therein butterflies she held captive under the dwells an artisan whose craft it is to charm of her so fascinating glances. fashion mortars; go, and take good

But here below, does it alone suffice heed of appearing before my sight to love and be beloved for the rendering again.” of us perfectly happy? No! the genius Julio departs, sorrowful and abashed; of civilization is there, ever ready to step and that it might not be thought he had in and combat with the softest inclinations told a lie, bends his steps towards the of one's nature, to torture our hearts byhovel indicated. He finds his way into imposing upon them its laws, its usages, a low, obscure, and ruinous apartment, its tyrannical conventions.

Poor ena

where he perceives a man seated and moured youth! how many tears, sighs, holding a mass of stone upon his knees, and anxieties are mingled with thy fugi- which had already assumed the form of tive joys!

This man's features wore The father of Nisida possessed all the a pallid hue, his vestments in shreds pride which ordinarily characterises an bespoke his distress; his sole companions artist of mediocrity; and that she might were the spiders, who noiselessly and innot be degraded from their station in dustriously wove their webs in the angles life, he was desirous of marrying his of his forlorn mansion. Julio simply daughter to a great sculptor, or at least to a relates his misadventure, his love, bis wealthy man, with a view likewise to the chagrin, the towering rage of the statuary, re-establishment of his own affairs, which and the little colloquy he had just held were greatly embarrassed. He conse- with him. The man of mortars smiled, quently refused the poor Julio as a son- arose froin his seat, saying—- Yes, I do in-law, and forbade him his house. make mortars, unfortunately I have done There was no further hope for him ; for finished at the present moment; but come little minds, always acrimonious and ex. again in a fortnight, and I will give you clusive, never revoke a decision; the one with which you will be satisfied.” more especially when it is an erroneous Then, reconducting Julio to the door, he

Our lovers were in despair ; they added, with a marked accent :-“ Do only saw one another by stealth; and not forget to return in a fortnight, for when a clandestine interview permitted you will find your account in so doing." them to exchange a few passionate Julio, on regaining his dwelling, set glances, a few words glowing with all the his brains to work in commenting upon enthusiasm of love, they were compelled these latter words. He could not fathom to live for a long time upon that soft their meaning: you will find your acremembrance alone.

a mortar.

one.

count in so doing!" What did they sig- statuary ;-" as for thee, Julio, place the nify? And what was there in common mortar on that slab, and get thee gone.' between his love for Nisida and a mortar ? He was compelled to obey the manNevertheless be pondered on it. The date. Julio had scarcely quitted the drowning man will catch at a straw. house ere a dark visaged man presents The fortnight has scarcely elapsed ere himself. It was a bailiff. He came in he presents himself again at the hovel of the name of the statuary's creditors to the mysterious personage.

The latter seize upon all he possessed. Nisida, immediately opens an old worm-eaten drowned in tears, implores an hour's press, and takes from it a mortar, which delay; it is granted her. As sanguine he places in the hands of the young man. as she was affectionate, she thought to “ Take this,” said he, “I make thee a save her father by having recourse to the present of it; thou wilt sell it, and then

sympathy and pity of her numerous become rich enough to espouse thy dear adorers. Poor innocent! how little thou Nisida. I make, however, one condition: knowest those men of pleasure; ardent carry this mortar to my neighbour the and generous enough to recompense vice statuary, and beg him on my part to -cold and selfish ever at the aspect of make a pestle for it.”

virtue in distress! It was all in vain Julio remained for awhile motionless that she implored them. Some few, with surprise at the sight of this mortar. however, offered their assistance; but It was of the finest Cararra marble. at what price! .... She rushes from The subject sculptured with an exquisite their presence, her whole countenance delicacy upon it was The Passion ; the suffused with the blush of indignation. figures seemed springing forth from the The hour of grace expired, the dark inert matter, and to group themselves in visaged bailiff, who was by nature equally attitudes befitting that solemn hour. pitiless, laid a strong hand upon all he They shewed a grave pre-occupation with could find. Gods, goddesses, saints and the divine mystery, a grief calm and Madonnas were corporeally seized upon resigned; a grief through which their and transported to the public marketChristian faith shone, like the dawn of place, there to be sold by auction. The those high destinies the celestial martyr mortar escaped not the fatal seizure. It had promised to the human race. The had been disdainfully thrown among the whole of the work bore a character of accompanying caricatures. sublime simplicity. Not that were cor- A great crowd assembled, and the rectness which is a natural emanation sale commenced with the statues, For from art, and pleases by the help of cer- a few paoli, a young girl carried home tain rules; but that something altogether the little mischievous blind god in her indefinable to oneself, which goes at once apron, and an old woman the Madonna. to the heart, and pleases, whilst it sets at A fat Bacchus went to a wine-merchant defiance all conventional trammels. It to serve him for a sign; and to the perwas a chef d'ouvre.

ruquier at the corner of the marketJulio hastened to carry it to the sta- place, a great lyric poet, and famous tuary, and explain the object of his mis- writer of libretti, an Apollo was knocked siop. Nisida was present. Do you not down. The mortar in its turn was put perceive her bending over that half- up for sale. One of the spectators apformed marble, feigning pretence of being proaches, examines it, and calls out busied with, yet not looking at it, but eagerly: casting a soft and furtive glance at Julio? “ One hundred piastres !" Behold also our stiff-necked statuary, “ A thousand piastres !” bids an ecclebending his rigid form over the vase with siastic in his turn. The auctioneer swelling cheeks. He makes a tour of re-echoes the bidding of a "thousand the bas-relief, and then says with a com- piastres for the mortar," loud enough to plaisant air :

be heard by all around.

The bystandTruly it is indifferently well done. ers stare with astonishment at one anThat fellow has stolen it somewhere. other : Julio is present at this scene ; his No matter, as he wishes me to make a heart beats quick, and he scarcely dares pestle, I will do so. I think that by sur- believe his ears.

The man of the mortar mounting it with a Ganymede—? is there also-hiding himself in the crowd.

“ It appears to me, padre mio," said His lip curls with a sardonic smile, and Nisida, “that a Ganymede with the his pale features appeared for an instant Passion--"

to be lit up by the rays of genius which “Hold your tongue, figlia mia, you gleam from his eyes.

The contest conknow nothing about it," retorted the tinues; the two out-bidders grow warm,

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