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BEAUTY AND GOODNESS.

New-Delightful. “ There is something exceedingly Old-Insufferable. touching in the love which beauty enter- Prudence-Parsimony. tains for goodness, and there is no Prodigality-Generosity. doubt that some women love from a Piety-Hypocrisy. feeling of benevolence, or tender com- Quiz-Any inoffensive person out of passion, regulated by reason.

Such an

your own circle. affection will know no change; it is a Religion -- Going to church every firm basis, and will endure through life.” Sunday morning.

StyleSplendid extravagance. FASHIONABLE GLOSSARY. Spirit — Contempt of decorum and

modesty. The meaning of several words in com- TruthMeaning uncertain. mon use having undergone an entire Time-Only regarded in music. change within the last ten years, the Vice-Only applied to men-servants following glossary is submitted for gene- and horses. ral adoption.

Wiched-Irresistibly agreeable.
Age-An infirmity nobody owns.
Buying Ordering goods without

DE AD HERO.
purpose of payment.
Bore-Any thing one does not like :

BY T. MILLER,

A DAY IN THE WOODS." any person who speaks of religion.

Conscience-Something to swear by.
Common sense-A vulgar quality.

(For the Parterre.)
Courage-Fear of man.
Cowardice- Fear of God.

SCENE.- Neptune's Palace, the body of Charity-A gold ticket to the opera,

Hero brought in by the Nereides, and or any other fashionable performance.

placed at the Sea-god's feet. Debt-A necessary evil.

There she was laid, so young and fairDuty-Doing as others do.

Leander's love,—now Neptune's care; Drunk-Happy.

So placid was that breathless rest, Dressed-Half naked.

So softly were those lips comprest, DeathA very disagreeable thing - That you might fancy as she lay, not to be mentioned.

A gathering smile appeared to play; Day-Night; or speaking from one Which to your thoughts would fain reply, P. M. to four A.M.

“I am too young and fair, to die.” Enthusiasm-Religion in earnest. So Hero lay-lovely in death, Economy (Obsolete.)

As though an angel held its breath, Fortune- The summum bonum. Beneath an amaranthine shade,

FashionThe ne plus ultra of excel. Where some young seraphim is laidlence.

Lest that his heaving breath might break Futurity-A religious bugbear. The heavenly beauty's rest; or shake

Husband—A person employed to pay The downy softness of her wings, one's debts.

Which she in careless lustre flings Honour_Standing fire well.

Expanded by her snowy side, Home-Everybody's house but your While half her loveliness they hide. own.

" At home”-The domestic amusement Calm rested Hero's beauteous head, of receiving three hundred people in a For not a floating charm had fledsmall room, to yawn at one another. Save from her cheeks, where roses grew,

Not at home”- Sitting quietly in They for a moment weeping flew, your own parlour, learning the last new To let the fairer snowdrops bloom song.

In sadness o'er their silent tomb; Love- Meaning not known, now that Or they had but retired to mourn, the ossification of the heart has become As though they would again return; a common disease ; the word to be found Her eyes had closed, like lily bells, in novels.

Which hide the dew within their cells, Modest—Sheepish.

Folding the pearl in virgin white; Music-Execution.

So o'er those orbs of tender light, Matrimony-A bargain.

The veily lids had dimly loured, Morality -A troublesome interruption But on the mind in death they poured to pleasure.

A fancied gleam, a ray of love, Nonsense - Polite conversation. Which while you gazed appeared to move,

;

Like the mute lips of eloquence, city in Europe, Rome only excepted, Although they stir not, to the sense, would be able to excite. As the traveller Appear in silence to impart,

from beyond the Alps enters the modern A motionless, persuasive art.

capital of Tuscany by the triumphal So her fair veily eye-lids lay

arch of San Gallo, long before the battleLike clouds which hide the God of day; ments of Palazzo Vecchio come into view, But every moment promise birth, his imagination has transported him to Of sunshine to the mourning earth. the times of the turbulent and warlike

republic, when the armed citizens mus. In careless clusters fell her tresses, tered in the great square, or sallied from As when some blue-eyed beauty dresses, their gates to defy the arms of the emWhose ringlets fall in wild array, peror, or the most formidable of the As if they were allowed to play

powers of Italy. From the establishThe while some favourite lock is curled ; ment of the republic to the period of its So was her waving gold unfurled, extinction, the career of this celebrated Which threw a wilder, sweeter grace commonwealth, in which aristocracy and Around the magic of her face ;

democracy were blended in the most exBut here and there the salt sea-foam, traordinary manner, was singularly sucAmid her ringlets made its home; cessful; and, while the other principal As though the waves could not forbear cities of Italy were at various times To kiss each single waving hair. stormed, and pillaged, and burned, and

sometimes sold by one despot to another Though pale as marble was her face, for a sum of gold, it cannot be said that No sign of death you there might trace; Florence, though repeatedly occupied by But only deem that silent breast one party of its own citizens, in opposiHad hushed its heaving snow to rest tion to another whom they expelled the But all was still nor sigh, nor breath, country, was ever taken possession of by Moved in that lovely wreck of death. a foreign hostile force. Neither the Even the mighty Sea-god wept !

chivalric valour of Castruccio Castracani, For while he gazed the big tears crept the fury of the Mastiff of Verona (MarFrom out his large immortal eyes- tino della Scala), nor the arms and reLike drops descending from the skies. sources of Giovanni Galeazzo Visconti, Nor could the Nereides forbear,

the conqueror of the north of Italy, were But each let fall a silent tear ;

ever able to enter these inviolated preAnd Amphitrite's bosom heaved, cincts.

Removed from those stormy And many a blue-eyed sea - nymph periods by a repose of three centuries, grieved.

Florence preserves the monuments of

the Middle Ages, of which, as one of the LETTERS

guide-books says, “andava superba," it FROM AN AMERICAN ARTIST. went proud. Its marble cathedral domi

nates the modern town, as it did the DELIZIE FLORENTINE.

stormy republic of the thirteenth century; Florence---the emotions it is calculated to ex

its campanile is still the finest in Italy, cite -rapid sketch of its history—its antiqui- and on several public edifices the lions ties-their durable construction—the Palazzo and the fleurs de lis of the republic, still Pitti-its immense size-royal procession.

hold their ground. But the monuments On arriving at Florence, you find a city anterior to the republic; before enume

of Florence remount to periods long containing one hundred thousand inhabitants, which, after all the storms of the rating the principal among them, let us Middle Ages, and a sleep of three centu

trace, in a few words, the outlines of its ries in the arms of its grand-dukes, main- early emperors, Florence, after the fall

history.

First mentioned under the tains its rank among the capitals of Italy. of the western empire in 476, followed You cannot pass for the first time the walls, which enclose this once-celebrated the revolutions of the rest of Italy, being seat of Italian liberty, without experi. subjected, first by the Heruli

, next bý encing a crowd of emotions, such as no

the Visigoths, then restored to the em

pire by the arms of Justinian, and finally • The words Delizie Florentine" do not

completely conquered, thoroughly deadmit of being exactly translated into English: nationalized and deromanized, if one may the nearest approach to it which I can offer is, so say, and occupied by the Lombards, “ Beauties of Florence.” In French there is who established themselves more permathe word Delices, with precisely the signification of its Italian original, and which they often nently than the other barbarians, and for employ.

about two hundred years held, with the

exception of the exarchate of Ravenna, vation, it forms the finest ornament of the entire surface of Italy. At length, the city. Unlike similar edifices in while preparing to add to their kingdom transalpine countries, which exhibit a those provinces which still acknowledged succession of elevations, diminishing as the sceptre of Constantinople, the French they ascend, and terminate in a pyrahero, after conquering on all sides those midal spire, the tower of Giotto carries countries which came in contact with its square form with the same dimensions France, as Livy says, “making all Eu- quite to the summit, and leaving at its rope Gaul," poured his victorious Francs base the town of Florence, with its crowd upon Italy, ruined in one campaign the of palaces and churches, stretches up at kingdom of the Lombards, and subjected a single reach to the preposterous height all the powers of Italy, whether Greek of two hundred and eighty feet, and or Barbarian, to the new western empire there holds its head in solemn commuof which he assumed the crown. On nion with the cupola of the cathedral the extinction of his family, Italy was and the tower of Palazzo Vecchio, The distracted by a number of contending cathedral itself, an imposing monument princes, until Otho, in 960, reduced all of the thirteenth century, is an edifice of of them to the emperors of Germany : vast dimensions and corresponding magtheir authority continued, without any nificence, at least on the outside, which serious interruption, until the league of may be said to be painted in marble, the Lombard cities in the twelfth century: being incrusted with marble slabs of and in the middle of that which followed, various colours. The windows are elathat is in 1250, on the death of the em- borately ornamented, and the doors preperor Frederick the Second, the Floren- sent the richest gothic work I have seen tines declared themselves an independent in Italy. In the interior, walls of a republic. The commonwealth, which raw white and the ornamental parts in they established, continued with various stone, are singularly out of keeping with modifications of government, to the be- the marble pavement and the marble exginning of the sixteenth century, that is, terior. If the whole edifice could be to the close of the Middle Ages, and the turned inside out, you would have a commencement of modern times, when church much more after the Italian the emperor, Charles the Fifth, esta- fashion, where the entire expense of blished in 1531 the dukes of Florence in decoration is often lavished on the inthe family of Medicis. This whole space terior. Also of republican times are of fifteen hundred years (that is, from several public edifices, as the Palazzo about the commencement of our era to Vecchio, the Loggia de Lanzi, the Barthe year 1531) you may divide, roughly gello, and a great number of palaces, into four periods, thus :—first period of among which the Palazzo Pitti, the resithe Romans-second period, from the dence of the grand-duke, holds the most fall of the empire in 476, to Charle- distinguished place. The facade of this magne, crowned emperor of the west in immense edifice presents the most im800—third period, from Charlemagne to posing display of masonry which I have the establishment of the republic in 1250 anywhere witnessed ; and hardly any -fourth period, the republic. Of the nation but the Egyptians have, as far as first period, that is, of Roman times, not a I know, produced anything comparable. vestige remains, excepting some columns While the architects of the Greek tememployed in subsequent edifices. Of the ples aimed at an effect by aggrandizing second period is the Baptistery, a Lom- the members of the architecture, at bard edifice of the seventh century, and the expense of the mass of the edi. the greatest curiosity in Florence. Office, the architects of Palazzo Pitti the third period, is the little church, and similar edifices, erected in TusDegli Apostoli, built by order of Char- cany during the fifteenth

century, lemagne, and the curious church of San considering the walls of a palace to be Miniato, on a hill which overlooks the the essential parts of the structure, entown. But everything vast and magni: deavoured to make them predominate as ficent at Florence belongs to the times of features in the architecture, and to exthe republic. Of this period is the press state, majesty, and strength; quacathedral and the other principal lities, which the residence of a prince or churches, also the campanile of the a nobleman in that day were expected to cathedral, which stands almost in contact exhibit. With these ideas to influence with the church; rich in early sculpture, them in employing the rescurces of their embroidered as it were with coloured art, they studied to give to the walls an air marbles, and rising to a most stately ele- of independence of support from columns or arches, which, together with could, in honour of the prince and the other features of Roman architecture, occasion. Presently a discharge of canwere thrown aside as unnecessary appen- non announced the arrival of the royal dages. Then they employed stones of pair at the Porta San Frediano, and an enormous size; and the doors and others were continued at intervals as the windows, which in those days were not cortége passed from the gate of the palace. glazed, displayed at once the thickness The immense' masses of the Pitti and of the walls and the substance of the Palazzo Vecchio, and the cupola of the separate blocks.

Again, they found cathedral, swallowed the sound, and then another source of expression in the sent it out deepened and solemnized over quality of the material, which must be the city and the surrounding country. allowed in these edifices to operate prodi- I began to think the grand-duke a more giously towards the general effect. It magnificent personage than I had hitherto would, indeed, be preposterous tó erect conceived him, but a circumstance was a wall

, like that which forms the façade yet to arrive, which impressed me more of Palazzo Pitti, of plastered brick-work, than any that preceded it, with the vastor even of the stone of which the proud ness of his palace. The first portion of colonnades of the Louvre and the Bourse the royal cortege at length appeared, conhave been constructed. The stone, with sisting of a string of travelling carwhich the architects of Florence piled riages, some quarter of a mile long, laden up the immense masses of the Pitti, and with servants and baggage ; one by one similar edifices, is the finest material I they entered the central gate of the have seen employed on any building, at palace, and passed into the court included least of modern times, the white marble within its walls. “ In the name of all of the cathedral of Milan not excepted. that is extraordinary,” thought I, “ how It looks more like 'cast-iron than any can they find room for all these carriages thing else to which I can compare it; and horses in the court of the palace ?" long after granite has begun to moulder, Before I had recovered my surprise, the it continues to grow harder and more royal equipages, consisting of two coaches

, flinty, and an expression of incalculable drawn each by six horses, entered the durability enters largely into the effect piazzá, the drums under the central archof those edifices which are constructed way of the palace immediately struck of it; particularly when, as in the case up, and the troops, who formed an of the Palazzo Pitti, Strozzi, and Ricardi, avenue across the piazza, presented arms four hundred years of exposure have while the carriages drove rapidly bedeepened its tints.

tween them, and entering the great gate. One should always endeavour to view way of the palace as the others had done, a great and important edifice under cir. disappeared in the court. After waiting cumstances calculated to bring its mag. to see the royal couple appear in the balnificence into full play. With regard to cony of the palace, and answer by bows the Palazzo Pitti, such an occasion was full of sovereign condescension, the afforded me by the return of the grand. acclamations and vivas of the people, I duke to his capital in June 1835, after went away not a little impressed with his marriage with the sister of the king of the scene I had witnessed, which from Naples, which had been celebrated at time to time turns up in my bead, notthat court. On entering the Piazza du withstanding the many wonderful objects Pitti, I found it already filled by the presented to my view and fixed in my crowd, while before me the huge and memory, in the course of a visit which I dark palace rose in the most command- have since made to the Bella Parthenope ing masses, being magnified by the mul- and tlie Imperial Rome. titude at its base beyond its usual dimen. sions; an effect which I have at other times observed in other situations. Here and there, placed at remote points against this immense façade, were stationed se- These are a tribe of Indians inhabitveral groups, supported by the two nar. ing the country along the banks of the row balconies, which at different heights South American river, La Plata. They stretch the whole length of the edifice; are peculiar for residing on islands or as objects which afforded additional stan

upon the tops of trees during the five dards of comparison, they operated with winter months when their country is astonishing effect to aggrandize the mass inundated. How truc it is, that one of the edifice. It seemed as if the palace half the world know not how the other made an effort to look as imposing as it half live!

THE ABIPONES.

LONDON: Published by Effingham Wilson, Junior, 16, King William Street, London Bridge, Where communications for the Editor (post paid) will be received.

(Printed by Manuing and Smithson, Ivy Lane.)

OF FICTION, POETRY, HISTORY, AND GENERAL LITERATURE.

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AN

HISTORICAL LEGEND

OF

BY THOMAS MILLER, AUTHOR OF

KING RICHARD THE THIRD had whispered to one of his followers to AND LADY ANNE:

hurry on foremost, and have all in preparation for her reception. Two soldiers,

who stood as guards, presented their Crosby Hall.

halberts as the lady entered ; menials

were also ready, to take charge of the A DAY IN THE WOODS," &c. horses; and the sewer, with other offi. (For the Parterre.)

cers, and serfs of the household, were

drawn up in readiness to welcome the CHAP. I.

Lady Anne to her new home.

“ Canst thou conduct me to a private LADY ANNE-What is it? Glo'ster. That it may please you leave these addressing an old man over whose brow

room, worthy seneschal,” said the lady, sad designs To him that hath more cause to be a threescore winters had passed, “ for I

am ill at ease, and would fain remain And presently repair to CROSBY PLACE, alone until his Grace's arrival ?” Where-I will with all expedient duty see

“ I wot not, good lady, of any other you. LADY ANNE.—With all my heart; and much it than the great dining-parlour, which is joys me too,

set apart for the guests of his royal To see you are become so penitent.Tressel, and Berkeley, go along with me.

Grace," replied the old man, “methinks Shakspeare's Richard III. that is most remote from the din of the

hall, and might of a verity meet your The bell of Saint Helen's Priory was

will." ringing for the evening vespers, when “ It pleaseth me mightily, honest Lady Anne, with her attendants, reached seneschal,” answered the lady. “I would the gloomy archway that led to the court- have thee conduct me thither.” yard of Crosby Hall. The ponderous The seneschal requested Bridget, a iron-studded gates were ajar, for Glo'ster female who stood by, to accompany the

mourner,

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