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lady; and they passed along the Great which floated from the rich tints of Hall, beyond the oriel window, by which shields emblazoned on the quaint-wrought a door was opened by a page in waiting, panes. Purple, and gold, and crimson, that led to the great dining-parlour. and azure blazed from the fronts of stars,

“ Nay, by our Lady, ye enter not and the forms of rampant lions, glaring here,” said the page, confronting Tressel ruddily on the armorial bearings of barand Berkeley, who were preparing to baric heraldry; and saints shone dimly follow their noble mistress ; “none enter forth in twilight hues, darkened with the western-wing, but by his Grace's excessive splendour, and grim warriors permission.”

stood erect upon the oriel windows, “ Out upon thee for an ill-natured clothed in scaly armour from head to churl," answered Berkeley ; “ hadst thou foot, and flaming in various dyes, which come to her Lady's dwelling, we would the gaudy eye of the artist had fantastihave given thee a cup of malmsey, ere cally given them. Boars heads, and we had made a stand at any door.” griffins, and green dragons, and piled

6 By the mass,” replied the page, I spears, and furled banners were all thank thee for teaching me courtesy, thereon enwrought, on which the crimthough it belongs not to me to show his son sunbeams burst, through every hue Grace's hospitality ; but beshrew me, of the rainbow. I will drink a cup with thee and thy Around the Hall hung suits of armour fellow.”

-below the high windows, corslets and “ Spoken like an honest page,” said helms, with vizors and drooping plumes, Tressel. “Go to now, why should we gauntlets and greaves, and cuishes, with not make merry-marry, but this would grenonilleries and iron shoes, and trianbe a fine place to troll a stave," pro

gular shields. Some of these bore the ceeded Tressel, lifting up his eyes to the dints of battle, or were broken in the lofty roof: “by Saint Ann, there is no joints, showing where the heavy battleneed to doff an helmet on entering.” axe or keen blade had pierced. Bows

“ His Grace of Glo'ster hath a mind and arrows were also hung on high, and to give himself room enow to grow in,” banners were suspended around, illumiwhispered Berkeley, who saw that the nated with rich bearings, which swayed page had retired to order them refresh- to and fro as the breeze rushed in when ments; “ I like not this sudden changing the door was opened. Lamps were also of our noble Mistress' mind, methinks it suspended from the roof by long chains, bodes no good : saw ye ever a woman which were let up and down by pulleys. wooed in such a plight, good Tressel ?” The lamps were of an immense size, in

“ Never, by my faith! but there is no the form of angels, all of iron; the flame swearing for woman, I trow; beside, he issued from the tips of their wings when had a tongue, might lure the devil to lighted, and as the wind swept through kneel and pray. She had a mind to use the apartment, they swung backward the sword, methought.”

and forward with a creaking sound; the “ So did I deem," answered Berkeley, rushes on the floor were also swayed by “when that he said, 'twas I did kill your the sudden gusts that at intervals entered husband : by my troth, this is a changing and made a rustling sound. At one end world,-she, who did curse his wife, of the Hall ran a long oaken gallery, there to consent for to become that wife richly carved after the manner of the which she so cursed-I like it not, 't is period, in fir.cones and rude festoons, enough to rouse the saints to work her and the forms of cross-winged cherubs,

with full-blown cheeks. In this gallery • Marry, it matters not,” replied Tres- were the minstrels seated at festivals; sel; “but, for the sake of her dear mas- behind it ran another division, broken ter, whom we all did love, we will at- into grotesque arches, and various opentend her well. I hate this humpbacked ings, through which might be viewed duke, who will as soon let a man's blood the Hall, by those who wished not to out, as a cook will twist a capon; but mingle in the merriment; behind these see, the page beckons us to yonder table were the private apartments, for the -by our Lady, this is a goodly hall, and guests or retainers of Glo'ster. well might vie with that at Westminster, In the Hall were various groups; some in which we saw King Henry crowned.” in armour pacing up and down, their

The sun was now sinking in the west, words and spurs clanking at every and threw his last red beams upon the tread as they walked in the centre, which painted windows of the Hall, scattering was free from rushes. Others conversed a dying glory over the rush-strewn floor, apart in two's and three's, their numbers

woe.

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increasing or decreasing as fancy guided self a greater rool; rould that be the them; all were busy with the rumour of way to her heart ?” Glo'ster's conquest over the Lady Anne, « Ask us Grace," replied the jester, for many of them had been out to wit

for he won the Lady Anne, by killness the removal of the remains of King ing X-r husband. Men do woo like cats Henry from St. Paul's, and were present now ; xwho kill a mouse

, to win a spouse

, when the duke compelled the bearers to and pur arid pur, and shew what they set down the royal corse. Some were have done. Trust me, 't is a killing seated at various tables, emptying the world—wouldst have a large estate ? kill huge drinking-horns, or attacking the the owner and take possession : for immense barons of cold beef, which singing : stood piled in readiness for the attacks of

“For hipsy pipsy, high and high, every hungry follower who entered. Some

Oh marry, quoth my ladye, helped themselves to large slices with

For if two love, oh one must die,

So up and sharp thy bladey." their daggers, then washed down their repast with bumpers of old ale, leaving “ Now out upon thee for a hoarse the unwiped foam upon their dark mus- raven-see the Duke enters, attended tachios. Around the huge ' fire-place by his Grace of Buckingham.” a group were collected, conversing in As they approached, all who were in the low tones, or laughing at the wit of the Hall drew towards the fire-place, leaving fool, who figured conspicuously amongst the two dukes to converse together at them, in his long ass's ears and bells the south end, where they entered from which jingled at every motion of his under the balcony, by a private door head. Two large dogs basked upon the which communicated with the lesser hearth, and seemed to enjoy the cheerful apartments. blaze which issued from the wood-fire. “I will marry her to-morrow,” said A conversation was here carried on be- Glo'ster, “in the meantime do thou tween the fool, and a dark-looking man muster a few of our friends to grace the who kept occasionally stirring the fire feast, and speak to the Bishop betimes with the point of his sword.

that we may have no delay. Hearken, “Methinks thou art preparing for I have a motive for so doing.” Here he some hot work to-night, uncle,” said the spoke in a low tone, “but I must conjester, addressing the dark warrior, who sole her; for by my soul this sudden kept stirring the logs with his weapon. transition from weeping to wooing will

“Peace, fool,” replied the other, “thou have affected her ladyship. Look I sad, wilt never allow the thoughts in thy soft my lord? for I must put on a woeful brains to cool.”

countenance, melancholy as those mutes Marry, but thou art a cooling piece,” who are trained to walk in mournful persevered the fool," and hast let out a processions, who do moan and wail by deal of hot blood in thy day, at his the hour, not for the dead but for groats. Grace's bidding."

Think not that I forget her curses; no, “Not so much," retorted the warrior, they shall return upon herself with ten"as thou hast let out folly, when his fold force. Thou knowest I would be Grace would have had thee silent.” king, but first there is much work to do,

“I know a thing, which if thou wast and some there are must sleep in Abrato let out, the Duke would not be silent,” ham's bosom,” answered the jester.

“I will talk with your Grace to"What is it?” inquired the warrior. morrow," replied Buckingham, “till

«Now out on thee for the veriest then, adieu.” goose,” replied the fool, “why the lady For a few moments Glo'ster stood thou didst let in."

alone at the end of the Hall, biting his “By my troth,” answered the warrior, lip, and gazing upon the floor in deep "neither wouldest thou, for it would meditation. At length he was aroused deprive thee of wagging thy bells at the by the falling of the lamp-chains, which wedding feast.”

a menial had let down previous to light“I'll tell the how to woo Alice,” said ing, for twilight was fast approaching, the jester, “if thou wilt be advised by a and the glare of the fire grew stronger fool.”

as it flashed upon the deep bay-window “Pr’ythee proceed then," said the opposite, and the piled armour that glitwarrior, “for I have a liking to the tered upon the walls, and the strong maiden.”

features of those who were assembled “Hearken, then! kill her brother !” around it. “Now by St. Paul, thou provest thy- Turn we now to the great dining.

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parlour, where tle Lady b nne was seated mourning robe of black velvet, with her in a high backed oaken Chair, gazing long raven curls unbound; and her beauthoughtfully upon the sinking embers, tiful countenance rendered more interwhich were only throwing out tful esting by sorrow, with an unusual palelight, as some undecayed brand saoul- ness upon her cheeks, her face seemed dered or blazed at intervals. Spposite to wear in the dim twilight more of the to her, but at a respectfui distance, sat repose of a habitant of heaven, than Bridget Crosbir whose father had built one that belonged to this earth. As and given his name to the Hall. He had Glo'ster gazed upon her for a few not long been dead, and Glo'ster had moments his harsh features became unonly hired the mansion for the term of relaxed; but when he thought how he seven years, after which Bridget was had won her, even in the presence of the again to become the sole possessor. “bleeding witness of her hatred,” and

“Then thou dost not belong to his after having murdered her husband, Grace's household, fair maiden,” in- his haughty brow gradually darkened, quired Anne.

and his proud lip curled in all its accusNo, my lady,"answered Bridget; "it tomed contempt, and ambition again was rumoured that you was coming reined his thoughts ; but this hither, and the Prioress of St. Helens, not for long, for forcing his features with whom I bide at times, said it would into repose, he stepped forth into the be well for me to welcome you to the apartment, and extending his hand to home of my fathers, as there were none Lady Anne, bade her “good even.” but rude men at arms, who know more A slight shuddering pervaded the of the tug of war than the courtesy lady as she arose, and her head seemed which should be shown a lady, and one to shrink by impulse from the salute he of gentle blood, whom it behoves all to imprinted upon her cheek. After rehold in high esteem.'

questing Bridget Crosbie not to depart, “Saint Helen bless her,” ejaculated he sat down for several minutes, and Anne. “I had intended to be alone, carried on a playful conversation, in for I have more of sorrow than I hope which the ladies took a part, charmed by will befall thy lot, and it does grieve me

his wit and enamoured of his discourse, much that I did hither come; but by for never did Satan when tempting our thy presence, much that does oppress first mother in Eden talk more eloquentme has been soothed; comest thou often ly, or shew greater powers of fascihere?”

nation.

He then arose, stating that as “ It was my wont,” replied Bridget, the king was ill at ease, much of the “ until his Grace did put aside the old business of the state devolved upon him, dark portraits which hung in the large and under pretence of reading his deshall. My mother's and my father's pic- patches, he retired by the private door ; tures were amongst them, and I did love and ascending the staircase, entered the to come and gaze on them for hours, apartment above, and there awaited the when none beside were with me. But return of the ruffians whom he had his noble Grace made plaint, that they appointed to murder his brother Cladid not stir up the minds of his followers to mighty deeds, and so resolved to hang The room in which Glo'ster was seated those gloomy arms and armour in their had an entrance from the pleasure gar. places, which have cased so many goodlyden (the site of which is still retained youths who all are dead. So he did in the old ground plans of the Hall, move them to another room adjoining marked as "the void piece of land or this, and I have power to come when- pleasance,') by means of an external ever it fits me best, to gaze upon them; staircase, * from which the great dining but they look now as if they never were parlourt was also entered by a private owners of this Hall, so closely are they door, at which the Duke had gained forced together in the small ante-room, access to the Lady Anne. But the which I will shew your ladyship anon. apartment in which he now sat, for a

While Bridget was conversing, the long time retained the name of the Duke had entered by a private door, Throne-room,t as it is supposed to have which was concealed by the wainscoting, and stood gazing upon the Lady Anne

rence,

* So late as 1756, a staircase existed someunperceived. His face for the moment

where in this situation, for in that year Lam

brooke Freeman, Esq., let to Joseph South and had lost its fierce demoniacal expression, others for seventeen years, the “ball, throne. his brow was unfurrowed, as if its dark room,” and “free egress np and down the back workings had ceased at the sight of one

+ These are the names given to these rooms so lovely. For Anne was clad in a rich in the oldest descriptions of the premises.

stairs."

been here where the crown was offered The page retired, and a fierce-looking him, it is at present known as the coun: ruffian entered, clad in armour; he cil-chamber. The apartment was hung neither doffed his iron helmet, nor yet round with rich arras of crimson, on bowed, but striding up to within a few which was enwrought a stag-hunt in paces of the Duke, exclaimed in a deep golden tissue ; horsemen and hounds hollow voice, “ Clarence is murdered.” glittered upon the drooping tapestry, What have you done with the and huntsmen lifted the bugle.horn to body ?” said Glo'ster. their lips, and by their swelling cheeks "Left it in a vault,” replied the appeared to blow lustily; hills and heavy ruffian, “ until your Grace gives order trees were thrown into rude perspective, for its being entombed." and the dogs wore strange forms, some “ And your companion," said the of them with heads like lions, for war Duke, “ comes he not for the reward ?" was more cultivated than the arts. The “ He gave me no assistance,” answerbeautiful ceiling was enriched with ed the murderer, “and did sorely grieve carven work, bunches of knot-grass, that he had undertaken to be there, and and festoons, and fir cones, and delicate fain would have persuaded me to have trefoiled tracery. A splendid bay win- left the deed undone." dow looked into the court-yard ; along “Why did you not stab him to the the centre of the room ran a long oaken heart?” exclaimed Glo'ster, rising from table, this was covered with cloth of the chair as he spoke : “ have you left gold, on which were laid innumerable him to escape?” piles of paper, plans of battles which “ He left me like a coward, as he is,” had been fought, and of murders that replied the murderer, “and escaped; but had yet to be executed. The floor was he bid the Duke to look behind him, covered with rushes, not scattered loosely while I stabbed him in the back, then as in the hall, but woven slightly to- plunged him into the malmsey-but, head gether, after the manner of our rush foremost, to make security more firm.” door-mats; several heavy oaken chairs “ Thou hast done well, answered also stood in the room. In one of these Glo'ster; “ I would that thou had'st cut sat Glo'ster, fronting the fire, busied thy comrade's throat; but, as thou sayest, in the perusal of a long sheet of parch- he was accessary to the deed, and dare ment, which was written in a close not to divulge. Died the Duke bravely ?” cramped hand. An iron lamp in the “ No, your Grace,” replied the murform of a dolphin hung above his head, derer, “he did beseech us to return to suspended from the ceiling, throwing you, and said you would reward us, if its light upon an unsheathed sword, we spared his life.” which lay on the table. His brows “ Poor shallow fool,” said Glo'ster, were closely knit, and while he read, his and laughed loudly a horrid tiendish band twice grasped, as if involuntarily, laugh, that echoed through the archedthe hilt of a dagger which was stuck in chamber, and even startled himself at its his belt. At length a page entered sound ; then, looking full in the ruffian's splendidly dressed, and doffing his velvet face, he said, “what is thy name! cap, while the long white plumes swept “ Forest ! your Grace,” replied the the floor as he held it in his hand, he murderer. bowed his head and said, “ There is one " And if thou would'st resolve to do without, impatient to speak with your me further service in this line, my good Grace.”

Forest, I would keep thee about my per“ But one?” replied Glo'ster, “by son, and see to it that thou fared'st well,” Saint Paul there should be two of them! said Glo'ster. admit him."S

I am at your Grace's service," replied Forest, « and shall be glad to do

your bidding.” | The old fire-place has been removed, but “ Then here is thy reward,” said the its situation is indicated by a modern one of extended dimensions.--History of Crosby Place, Duke, and lifting up the lid of a heavily by E. L. Blackburn.

iron-bound chest, he took out a handful ♡ Glo'ster.-When you have done, repair to of gold pieces, letting fall several upon Crosby Place ;

the oaken-floor, as he presented them to But sirs, be sudden in the execution; Withal obdurate; do not hear him plead,

Forest. “ In a day or two, I will hold For Clarence is well spoken.

further converse with thee; in the meanMurderer.-Tot, tut, my lord, we will not time, I will add thee to the number of stand to prate,

Then, striking the table Shakspeare's King Richard III. with the hilt of his dagger, as a summons

retainers.”

my Talkers are no good doers.

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for the page, he gave orders that Forest the door of the adjoining apartment, should be attended to, as one of his fol- which, was the Duke's sleeping room, lowers, and they quitted the apartment, and at length the heavy door swung wide leaving Glo'ster alone to his own dark open upon its grating hinges, and a dimthoughts.

blue ghastly light issued from it, which The Duke again resumed his seat, and gradually filled the space in which he sat for several moments with his face stood. Big drops oozed from his brow, buried in his hands, in profound thought. and he placed his hand upon the table to At length, the heavy arras moved upon support himself, for his knees knocked the wall, making a rustling sound, which together with fear, as a shrill scream started him from his reverie, while gusts rang through the mansion. At length of wind continued at intervals to moan Glo'ster sr.atched up his sword, and down the wide chimney. At length he struck the table, but no page appeared ; arose from his seat, and began to pace to and again another sound arose-a horrid and fro in the apartment with rapid burst of fiendish laughter, chilling his strides, muttering to himself in a low very blood by its mockery. He tried to tone at first, but which gradually arose shout, but his tongue clove to the roof of as bis passion increased

his mouth, like one who attempts to call “ I fain would spare their lives--but for help in a dream. Then rose a shacurse the brats, they stand between me dowy form from the lurid haze, and and the throne. I have shed blood stood full in the centre of the open door, enough to appease an enraged lion; but growing in darker relief as the horrid more must yet be shed, ere I attain the light increased, and pointing its bleeding crown I grasp at. Clarence's death sits hand to the Duke--and then a low, heavy on my soul just now, poor, weak, sepulchral voice, terrible even by its confiding Clarence ! But why should I hollow solemn tone, exclaimed, without let thoughts like these unman me?-he moving a pallid lip, for the sound seemed might have died by other hands, and I to issue from the earth, “ Gloʻster ! shed not his blood ; 't is the base world Glo'ster! Glo'ster! behold thy murdered that finds these instruments to do such brother !" Then came a silence more damned work. And Forest ! yes, he frightful than the sound, for even the shall murder the princes when they do wind seemed at that moment to hold its arrive. To-night, I hear, they sleep at breath. Glo'ster attempted in vain to Northampton : a few more nights, and rally himself ; the sword fell unconscithey shall sleep, where!- what matter, ously from his grasp, and he made faint though it be where I shall never go. passes with his arm, as though he still This world was made for me to stir in : held the weapon, uttering in husky acI will be King, if it be alone that I may cents, which seemed to choke themselves have these lofty-headed lords kneel at my as they arose, Avaunt, damned spirit ! feet that I may spurn them. But I or come in the shape of some tiger or was born with teeth, and made to bite: devil-any-any, but thine own- -I did surely my sire was a wolf, and from his not the deed-'twas—'twas-nature I did draw this love of prey. “ By thy command, false Glo'ster," And what are a few drops of blood !---all, answered the phantom : “ again will I all must die, and those I murder might visit thee-then thou shalt know that thy do many crimes. No, I am no villain; huur is at hand.” but one who hurries souls from out this The spirit then vanished, as though wicked world, to find a better place. it sank through the floor, and the room Hark! methinks I'm like a child, who was again enveloped in gloom, saving sees wild faces moving on the wall !- the faint ray which gleamed from the again! what sound is that? 't is like a dying lamp as it shot up its feeble flame dying groan, for so King Henry moaned fitfully. But the Duke had fallen, and when I stabbed him in the Tower, where lay like one dead, among the scattered but to night my brother died.”

rushes, not a sound reigned in the Glo'ster strained his eyes through the apartment. dull gleams of the room, for the iron

Continued at page 157. lamp burned dimly, and shed but an imperfect haze around. Sometimes the wind swept in fitful gusts from the wide All mankind are equally in search of chimney, and waved the faint flame aside, vivid sensations. The young seek them leaving that part where he stood in in love; the old in avarice; princes in shadowy light. But soon a sound, as war; the people in sedition; the chris. of a dying man, seemed to break through tian in original plans of benevolence.

SENSATIONS.

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