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RICHARD PLANTAGENET.

HISTORICAL AND asked him some questions, spoke kindly BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. to him, and gave him some money. (For the Parterre).

Then the forementioned gentleman returned, and conducted him back to

his school. That Richard III. left no legitimate “ A few years elapsed, when the same issue we all know, but by some histo- gentleman came to him again, with a rians it has been asserted that he had a horse and proper accoutrements, and natural son, who survived his father. told him he must take a journey with The following account, given in a letter him into the country. After riding from Dr. Brett to Dr. Warren, presi- hard for a day or two, they came to a dent of Trinity-hall, Cambridge, dated place where two armies lay encamped Sept. Ist, 1733, although somewhat at opposite to each other. He was taken variance with history, is interesting to the principal tent of the one, where

About Michaelmas, 1720, the doctor he was received by the magnificent perwent to pay a visit to Heneage, Earl of sonage of his former interview, who Winchester, at Eastwell-house, where now embraced him, and told him he that nobleman shewed him an entry was his father, and the king of England. in the parish register, which the doctor But, mark me child, said he, to-morrow transcribed immediately. It ran thus : I must fight for my crown, and you “1550, Richard Plantagenet was buryed may be sure if I lose that, I will lose my the 22 daye of December.”

life too, but I hope to preserve both. The register did not mention whether Do you stand in such a place (directing he was buried in the church or church. him to a particular station), where you yard, nor could any memorial be re- may view the battle, out of danger, and trieved of him, except the tradition pre- if I gain the victory, come to me, and I served in the family, and some remains will then acknowledge and provide for of his house. The story of this man, as you. But, if I should be so unfortuit was related by the Earl of Winchelsea, nate as to lose the battle, then shift as is thus. “When Sir Thomas Moyle was well as you can, and take care to let building Eastwell-house, he observed nobody know I am your father, for no that when his chief bricklayer left off mercy will be shewn to any one so work, he generally retired with a book. nearly related to me. The king then The curiosity of Sir Thomas was excited gave him a purse of gold, and dismissed to know what book the man read, but him. The result of the battle of Boswas some time before he could discover worth-field well known. He followed it, as he always put the book up if any the directions he had received, and when one came towards him. At last, how- the battle was lost, and the king killed, ever, Sir Thomas surprised him, and he hastened to London, sold his horse snatching the book from him, found it and fine clothes, and the better to conto his surprise, to be in Latin. Here- ceal his origin, and that he might have upon he examined him, and finding that the means of an honest livelihood, aphe pretty well understood the language, prenticed himself to a bricklayer, which inquired how he came by his learning. humble vocation he had followed ever Upon this, the man told him that as he since, finding his recreation in reading had been a good master to him, he those authors which had formed the would venture to entrust him with a study of his childhood.” secret he had never before revealed. He Sir Thomas Moyle was deeply interthen informed him that he was boarded ested in his story, and perceiving him to with a priest, without knowing who his be almost past labour, permitted him to parents were, till he was fifteen or six. build a house on his estate, and, I be. teen years old. During this period, a lieve, settled a pension on him. There gentleman, who took occasion to acquaint he continued till his death, which was him that he was no relation to him, about in his 81st year, for the battle of came once a quarter and paid for his Bosworth was fought the 22nd of Auboard, and took care to see that he gust, 1485, at which time he was between wanted nothing; and one day, this gen- fifteen and sixteen. tleman took him and carried him to a There are, it is true, some historical fine large house, where he passed through facts that impeach the veracity of this several stately rooms, in one of which he story, and especially the certainty that left him, bidding him to stay there. Richard passed the night at the Boar's Soon after, a man of noble appearance Head Inn, Leicester; but, if true, it and finely dressed, came to him and gives a far different idea of Richard's

DEATH OF PETER THE GREAT.

person to that generally entertained; preserved our country from a third but history, before the invention of attempt to restore the Stuarts to the printing, was for the most part little else throne of their ancestors. “I know, than the flatterer of the reigning mon- from high authority,” says Sir N. W. arch at the expense of all who went Wraxall, in his Historical Memoirs, before him.

“ that as late as the year 1770, the Duke

de Choiseul, then first minister of France, WALWORTH, AND WAT TYLER.

not deterred by the ill success of the In a very curious early MS. in the attempts made in 1715 and 1745, British Museum, is an account of Wat meditated to undertake a third effort for Tyler's rebellion, and she writer insin- restoring the house of Stuart.

His uates that it was more owing to revenge enterprising spirit led him to profit of, than loyalty that Walworth stabbed (by) the dispute which arose between “the arche rebell.” He says,

" that on

the English and Spanish crowns respectthe firste rysing of Tyler, he commenced ing the possession of Falkland Island, in by destroying and burnyng several stores

order to accomplish the object. As the or houses of famouse (infamous) noto- first step necessary towards it, he disrietie for colapsed women, belonging to patched a private emissary to Rome, Walworth, the citizen, in the rentes of who signified to Charles Edward, the the Bishoppe of Winchester.” If the Duke's desire of seeing him immediately writer is to be credited, it would appear

at Paris. He complied, and arrived in from this statement that the “worthie that city with the utmost privacy. citizen, on finding that Wat Tyler had Having announced it to Choiseul, the destroyed his property, sought an oppor. minister fixed the same night at twelve tunity for revenge, which he soon after- o'clock, when he and the Marshal de wards found to his heart's content, as Broglio would be ready to receive the well as for displaying his loyalty in the Pretender, and to lay before him their presence of his sovereign.'

plan for an invasion of England. The

Hotel de Choiseul was named for the The circumstances attending the death interview, to which place he was enjoined of this great prince are but little known,

to repair in a hackney coach, disguised, but they reflect the greatest honour on

and without any attendant. At the "his memory, and hold forth to mankind appointed time the Duke and the an example of intrepidity and humanity Marshal, furnished with the requisite seldom witnessed. "The Czar had just papers and instructions drawn up for his recovered from a very dangerous indis- conduct on the expedition, were ready; position, when he undertook a voyage but, after waiting a full hour expecting down the Neva, in order to inspeci the his appearance every instant, when the progress of a new canal. A cutter with clock struck one, they concluded that several soldiers on board struck on the

some unforeseen accident must have sands at some distance, and the vessel intervened to prevent his arrival. Under which he immediately dispatched to

this impression, they were preparing to their relief grounding also, the Czar, im- separate, when the noise of wheels was patient of delay, jumped into the sea up

heard in the court-yard ; and a few to his knees, notwithstanding the waves

moments afterwards, the Pretender

entered the room in a state of such were very boisterous, and by his own exertions and example, extricated the sol- intoxication as to be utterly incapable diers from their very perilous situation.

even of ordinary conversation. DisHe had them taken to the houses of some gusted, as well as indignant at this dispeasants on the shore, where they were

graceful conduct, and well convinced treated with all the tenderness of hu

that no expedition undertaken for the manity. The next day the Czar was

restoration of a man so lost to every seized with a violent fever, attended with

sense of decency or self-interest, could inflammation in the bowels. He was

be crowned with success, Choiseul withimmediately conveyed to St. Petersburg, out hesitation, sent him the next morning where, after a painful illness of two

a peremptory order to quit the French

The Pretender returned months, he expired on the 25th of Jan. dominions."

to Italy, where he experienced every mortification, and ended his inglorious

career in January 1788 at Florence, as This unfortunate prince, so long the his grandfather James II. had done in terror of England, latterly gave himself 1701, at the palace of St. Germains, up to wine, and this failing it appears

uary, 1725.

CHARLES EDWARD.

near Paris.

G. M. J.

AN ILL-USED GENTLEMAN. Ah! a patch of moorland, skirting

and relieving the rich fertility of the (For the Parterre.)

district, its dark heathery surface irre

gularly dotted with adult and incipient CHAP. I.

sheep (oh, the delicious flavour of moorIt was a bright, beautiful, breezy morn- land mutton! rich, yet not cloying; so ing in the laughing, loving, and “ leafy specially different from the

greasy month of June,” when, on opening the lusciousness of the plain !), with here door that leads into my little spot of and there a four-footed ass, standing ground, (dignified by the name of gar- considering whether to eat or sleep. den), I became at once aware that I was Blessed state of animal and assinine labouring under a very decided attack existence! Through this moor a tiny of that pleasant but profitless distemper brook went “singing a quiet tune," as it termed idlesse. I looked towards the wended its solitary and uncared-for way town; there it stood, the image of puffy towards some more pompous and imporimportance, fuming and smoking away tant geographical stream. I followed it in its usual busy and petulant manner, of course—for an idle man as naturally and I bethought myself of the dust and and unconsciously followeth the course the dirt, and the glare and the heat- of running water as he followeth that of the bartering and the bargaining, the his own nose-quite busily employed in buying and the selling, and the rest of fashioning the most filmy and fantastic the multifarious bustle going on within projects, and erecting aerial castles of a ils walls, and the agreeable tranquillity very gorgeous and imposing description, of my spirit became disturbed. I turned when, on rounding a small knoll on towards the country, and there it lay- which grew a patch of furze, I came hill and dale, tillage and pasturage, suddenly upon a gentleman much more wood, water, and greensward, basking usefully and practically employed. He and rejoicing in the beneficent and pro- was washing a pocket handkerchief in creant sunshine. Suddenly that portion the limpid waters of the brook, and of the Scriptures which saith, “there is humming “ Love's Young Dream." a time for all things, a time for work It was a singular employment for a perand a time for play,” became forcibly son of that gender, yet did he not seem impressed upon me. Certes, quoth Ì, altogether unskilled in the exercise of the latter part of that injunction has it, and evermore he washed and sung, been too long neglected ; and away I “Oh ! there's nothing half so sweet in life strode towards the conscientious dis- As young love's dream !" charge of my duty.

On the aforesaid furze bush lay out

spread that refuge for the shirtless surHow pleasant and quiet are the works named “a dickey,” and alongside of it, of nature to those of man,-how serene that other piece of assumption, that and noiseless her magnificent operations ! goeth by the name of collar, both of Here was no clanking of hammers, or which had evidently undergone a recent hacking of saws, or puffing of steam, or partial purification. On becoming villanous gases and exhalations, yet was aware of my presence he attempted a her ladyship labouring on the most ex. hasty concealment, but immediately tensive scale. How delicious too, were perceived the futility of such a procedure. the accompaniments of her handicraft! had become so fully, yet so simply and the young corn springing, and the merry

unobtrusively aware of the state of his birds singing in the blue sky above it ; the linen and cotton garments, and the green grass growing, and the fresh breeze

manner in which they were restored to blowing far and wide. Here and there, their original complexion, that subterin the nooks and corners of the winding fuge or ill-feeling were equally out of lanes, was the bee humming over some the question. He therefore, with a clump of natural poetry-I mean wild- pleasant, yet rueful smile bade me “good flowers-gratifying eye and ear with its morning,” and jocosely added, that it cheerful and luxurious industry, while, was “fine drying weather !" on every side, the beautiful blossoming Very,” responded I. hawthorn impregnated the cool air with “ Ah! sir," continued the primitive its pure and healthful fragrance. washerman with a sigh, as he spread the God made the country, and man made the handkerchief alongside of the dickey and town."

collar, “misery acquaints a man with A glorious line that, thought I, as I strange bedfellows !" sauntered dreamily on my pleasant and At once I knew him to be a player, purposeless path.

by the inappropriateness of his quota- enemy. As regarded the other appurtetion.

nances of my friend, his waistcoat was “ Tut!” said I, “ 't is nothing. The not exactly worn i'the newest gloss,” it daughters of kings did the same thing had evidently seen better days-his shoes in the classical times, before the world wanted mending very much, and the knew anything of soap. I like to see a verdure had departed from his hat. man independent of the fashions of his “ Stop a moment till I dress,” said he, day."

as I prepared to set forward ; and he “ And then,” said he, evidently re- vanished with his linen behind the furze. lieved by the way in which I treated the In a few minutes he re-appeared, subject, and disposed to carry on the arrayed in a clean shirt (at least as far conversation in the same strain—" wash- as public display was concerned), and a erwomen are so careless! now when a starchless collar. He then gave his gentleman officiates as his own laundress, hands and face a partial ablution in the he is at least sure-(with a serio-comic brook, and which he said the sun would glance at the furze bush), that he can dry as we walked along; (what a greatlose nothing !"

ness of idea to use the sun for a towel !) “Most veritable ! therefore take heed," drained a little hair-oil from a bottle quoth I, “ how you depart from your which he produced from his pocket, present practice.”

rubbed it on his hair, adjusted his hat In five minutes we were the best on one side, buttoned his coat, as far as friends in the world, and an infinity of such a feat was practicable, and exclaimwords ensued. In fact we talked our- ing, “now then all's right!" started off selves hungry; and as it was now about by my side. the hour for refreshing and replenishing I could not help admiring my new the stomach, I ventured to propose to acquaintance as we walked along. Notmy new friend that he should dine with withstanding his apparently forlorn conme at a small hostel situated on the out- dition, his confident air, brisk step, and skirts of the moor, and this proposal he lordly swagger, plainly declared that he accepted with a frankness and alacrity, was on exceedingly good terms with which shewed him to be a person who himself. He was a man that had evi. despised ceremonious observances as dently made up his mind to have nothing much as he did new and gaudy apparel. to do with misfortune; others might

But I must endeavour to give some grapple with her, but he would slip aside idea of my companion's rather singular and let her pass. He was, to use his appearance.

He seemed to me a man own expression, “a gentleman out of about five and thirty, with a somewhat luck !" but his sky was still clearly filled long and cadaverous physiognomy, yet with rainbows of the most brilliant pleasant withal. His person had a lean, character; and I could not help contrastlank, dinnerless-like look, as if he had ing to his advantage, the happy buoyancy not sat at “good men's feasts,” or what of his temperament, which stood him in is much more to the purpose - men's place of the most refined or stoical phigood feasts, for some time past, and his losophy, with that of others, who revert vestments were in a state of exceeding regretfully and mournfully to the past, dilapidation. He wore a snuff coloured dwell despondingly on the present, and surtout, from which most of the buttons look anxiously and doubtfully towards the had departed, and a pair of contumacious future. Yet for all this, he informed pepper -and-salt coloured pantaloons, me in confidence as we proceeded, that which obstinately refused to proceed he considered himself by far the most farther than half-way down his legs ; ill-used gentleman on the face of this they could never have been made for him, green and good-looking earth. but must have been the gift or bequest of some dear and much shorter friend. After the third plate of our country An attempt had been made to forcibly cheer (fried ham and new-laid eggs) had compel them to approach nearer to the disappeared, and the fourth bottle of ale ankle by the wearing of straps, but like had gone to attend upon it, my friend all coercive measures in a free country, began to stretch himself in a luxurious it had failed of success, for though the picktooth fashion, and wonder if there left leg was still in equivocal subjection, were any filberts in that part of the the right, scorning to submit to the domi- country. Mine host professed his ignonion of the strap, had resolutely broken rance of such a vegetable, but said be loose, leaving, however, a few frag- had some capital milk-cheese. In the mentary trophies in possession of the absence of filberts, milk-cheese was not

66

me

were

to be despised, and after about another Professional name," quoth I, taken quarter of an hour's labour at the cheese, rather aback. and the evanishment of two more bottles “O true! my real name—that is, the of ale, the “gentleman out of luck,” be- name my ancestors were contented to put gan to manifest decided symptoms of up with, and obliging enough to transcommunicativeness.

Like a

vast of mit to me, was Wiggins! - actually good-tempered fellows, the more he Wiggins ! Think of that !-to which drank the stronger became the infusion they had the excellent taste to prefix of the pensive and sentimental in his Timothy, in compliment to my uncle, discourse. The conversation assumed the barber— Timothy Wiggins !-Hama mixed character.

let by Timothy Wiggins! Good heavens,

sir, it was not to be endured. Could “ 'Twas sad by fits, by starts 'twas wild,"

the great Garrick himself be resuscitated, and like that of most theatrical people, it and play Hamlet under the name of was simply, solely, and entirely about Wiggins, the critics would sneer, and himself and his concerns; the losses, the audience laugh at him.” crosses, trials, and 'tribulations he had I cordially admitted that as far as endured—the neglect and contumely he euphony was concerned, Wiggins was not had put up with from mercenary mana- exactly the thing, and wishing to take gers and misjudging audiences; and at least a seeming interest in the fate this

, together with a goodly list of bro- of the said Wiggins alias Stanley, inken engagements, unpaid salaries, and quired if he had any existing engagement. profitless benefits, united to a fondness “ Why yes,” said he, drawing up his for good living, a social glass, and “gen- collar, which being starchless, required teel” company, had reduced him to his some management to keep it in an uppresent circumstances, which he assured right position. “ I at present lead in

crazy and unmanageable Weazle's company-little Nic Weazle's enough, in consequence of the paltry -a gentleman well known in these and contracted notions of tradespeople districts — and now performing at the in provincial towns, who scrupled — he temporary theatre in the neighbouring could not for the life of him surmise village of Bwhy — to give gentlemen in his line “ But Weazle, I presume, is like the credit. His prospects, however, he said rest of the managerial tribeblind to were capital—if he only had 51.; but merit, eh ?” the want of this insignificant sum pre- “Why not exactly. I must do him vented his reaching the metropolis and the justice to say, that he does apprecirealizing a handsome fortune. Of this ate me, and stands my friend as far as he did not entertain the slightest doubt. lies in his power.” In fact, he assured me, that if he only “ His power !-why is be not manager had fair-play, he would have been at the autocrat-supreme dictator !" top of his profession, and wallowing in Mr. Stanley laid his hand impressively wealth long ago; because, as he pretty on my shoulder. plainly hinted, there not being at present

“Sir,” said he, in a troublous voice, a man on the British stage (with the and with a peculiar expression of counexception of himself), that could render tenance, which induced me to surmise full and complete justice to Shakspeare, that he must himself have been entrapthere was little or nothing to prevent ped sometime or other in the snare of such a desirable consummation.

matrimony; “sir, Weazle is a married “Of course you have seen my Mac- man!" beth ?” said he.

“ The devil !” I confessed that I had not had that “Ay, you may say that—and such pleasure. Indeed, I was obliged to own a woman! Alas! poor Weazle! Now, that I was ignorant of even the name you see, I happen to be most disgracious of the distinguished tragedian in whose in the eyes of Mrs. W. for sundry reacompany I had the honour to find In the first place, I have intermyself.

fered more than once, when I certainly “ Name, my good sir, my professional had no business, and prevented her beat. name (at present) is Stanley-Marma- ing her liege lord; and secondly, I was duke Stanley - how do you like it ? the man that detected her affair with Noble name!

associations! Brown, and informed Weazle of it.” Charge, Chester, charge-on, Stanley, 66 Affair with Brown!" on !' and egad, I will on' as soon as I “Why, yes. The truth is— frailty get those five pounds."

thy name is woman!' Mrs. Weazle

sons.

fine

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