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has it witnessed yet this glorious spectacle. opinion. Perchance were I to practise Here within thy palace-walls hast thou in the amphitheatre, it might lessen their hitherto hidden thy wonderful prowess. esteem for my abilities.” Here in the shade, unapplauded, nay, « Oh gods ! exclaimed Eclectus, unknown by thy subjects, fall, beneath “what a thought !”. thy imperial hand, giants and barbarian “ Beard of Jove !” cried Lætus, "your warriors from every corner of the lordship's modesty is as great as your globe.”

valour!• While beasts the fiercest that ever “ Grant us thy promise, immortal made mortals tremble," continued Læ. Commodus,” said the chamberlain, “extus, start at thy approach and sink hibit thy godlike powers on the arena.' beneath thy blow !”

« And lest I be deemed a flatterer, a “ Not an Athlete can stand before character I most thoroughly abhor, thee!”

added the pretorian, “I must not con“ Jove ! how that last gigantic Scy- ceal from your lordship that, although thian bit the dust but now !

the mass of your subjects give full “ And the sable Ethiopian, too! I credence to every tale of your matchless confess, oh Commodus, I tremble for might and skill, yet be there some who the result.”

shake their sapient beards and cry, 'hum!' “ Drank ever blade more deeply of and "ha!' and it is good to be an emthe crimson tide ? ” asked the emperor, peror!'and when we see, we will bewith a savage smile. “ Hermes! I lieve !"" scarce knew it myself ere it was twice “ How! friends! Be there such dull plunged in his heart.”

Romans !” exclaimed the monarch, a “ In truth,” said Lætus, “I think shade crossing his brow. • Were it but your sword, mighty Commodus, is in- to still their saucy doubts, the thing you stinct with slaughter, and has a natural speak of might not be amiss.” thirst for the blood of these barbarians. “ It would carry joy through all the Such amazing power never before dwelt city,” replied the satellites. in human arm.

* But an emperor“ I swear to ye, good Lætus and “ Went not Nero even into Greece to noble Eclectus,” said the emperor, wrestle at the Olympian Games ? ” demodestly, “I would not hear these manded Lætus. things, but that I feel there is a certain He was overcome,” cried Eclectus; foundation for your flatteries.

I ever

“but surely the fear of suchloved, ay, in my earliest boyhood, the Fear! Eclectus? By the immortal glow and glory of war. My father, Jupiter! in my objections I did but jest. Marcus, thrust ever on me pedagogues Fear? The great god Hermes bear me in what he termed branches of learning.' witness, I should meet with confidence, Pluto! how they wearied me! But my and before the assembled world, the noble Moors and Parthians, who taught boldest gladiator that ever trod the arena; me to dart the glittering javelin and send let them hunt the Elbe or the Danube the swift arrow to the mark-I know for their brawniest giants, let them bring not how it was, but my very soul and Arab or Moor, Briton, Greek or Numinature leaped to them."

dian, I will meet the best of them, foot “ Would to Jupiter! my noble lord,” to foot, hand to hand, before assembled said Lætus,“ you would gratify your Rome, and that as soon as notice can be wondering subjects with the sight of given to these doubting slaves of mine. your godlike skill in all the arts that be- Go, Eclectus, announce to the people come a man, a soldier, and an emperor! that Commodus, their emperor, will cast The report of it is abroad on every lip, aside his imperial robes and his imperial and in the amphitheatre, when a gladi- power, and challenges the universe for a ator makes a death-plunge, when the match. Begone! By the thunder of most formidable lion of the day lies at Jupiter ! the thought makes my lagging length extended on his back, the popu- pulses beat anew. Sei! loitering slave, lace cry out to one another, 'a glorious wine!” bit !! . a sweet plunge!' worthy of a The tawny Parthian presented a crystal man!” worthy of a god!' Commo charger of Chian. The two parasites dus himself could scarcely do better !'" withdrew, and Sefi remained alone with

" Ay! speak the knaves thus, my his master, excepting the mute slaves good Lætus?” den ed the emperor, who, waiting in an ante-chamber, came with evident gratification. “ I think, and went at the slightest summons, and then, it were better to leave them in their for every idle caprice.

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" It means,

It was at certain times the practice of urge among my subjects ? a petition the emperor thus to feast alone, Alinging from the people ?” off, with the cares of empire, much of its “ We are come now," replied Clauformal pomp. He had been previous to dius," on affairs relating solely to this interview engaged as usual in prac- thyself.” tising the sports in which he so much “ Myself !” delighted, several gladiators having had “ The day is almost here when, as thy the honour of dying beneath his hand proclamation goes, thou wilt display thy to beguile the ennui of his morning skill in the amphitheatre.” hours. Nothing was more common than Ah, old philosopher, runs thy mind such events in his amuseinents, which that way?” he had hitherto carried on either in the “Commodus, my master, my emperor, school for gladiators or in the private my son!” the aged man clasped his grounds of his imperial palace. It ap. trembling hands, and tears rolled down peared, too, that he every day grew more his cheeks. sanguinary, and on the present morning “What-how-Claudius-what means two unhappy slaves had expired beneath this childish emotion ? " his knee, amid the shouts and laughter

said Pertinax, in the of his select auditory. Fatigued with most respectful but firm tone, “that his manly toils, he had reclined to repose Claudius Pompeianus and myself, oh himself before his daily feast, when the Commodus, cherish for thee a love more flatteries and artifices of his chamberlain true and deep than words can expressand pretorian prefect had started this new a love to which our own lives would be design, which, in that insatiable yearning cheerful and inadequate sacrifices; and for excitement, the most fearful penalty we come before thee now to prove by of all illicit or immoderate indulgences, our actions the fidelity of our friendship. had at once kindled his imagination. We place ourselves in peril to do thee

service.” “ It must be with thee quite alone,

66 What service ?” demanded Com. oh Commodus !” exclaimed Claudius modus. Pompeianus the senator, the day previ- To put thee in possession of truth.ous to that appointed for the imperiał “ Truth, slaves ? combats in the amphitheatre.

“ Yes, oh prince,” said Claudius, Am I not alone, reverend sirs ? " 6 among the gems of thy throne, this is demanded the emperor, somewhat im- wanting. We come to place it before patiently.

thee. Thy people are perishing. PlaClaudius looked around upon Lætus, gue and famine rage everywhere. The Eclectus, and Sefi.

ministers thou hast appointed betray their Even these,” said Pertinax, prefect trust and enrich themselves by the most of the city, “even these must be no unholy means.

Lætus and Eclectus listeners to that which we have to say." trample on the whole empire, and thy

• Good Jove!” exclaimed Commodus, appearance to-morrow in the amphi. “ knew I not your long-tried and up- theatre--" right characters, I might well deem it “ Speak on.” imprudence to comply with a request so “ Is regarded with horror by all the strange. But, thanks be to the gods, good and

wise." I dare be indulgent to my servants, even “ Now, by the immortal gods, Clauwhen they press me beyond patience. dius, this is too much!” Good Lætus, and Eclectus, your leave

“ We have come to thee, oh emperor," -Sefi, begone. Now, most learned rejoined Pertinax, “ in peace and love. senator, most wise and grave prefect, we Thou art young, and youth loves pleawait your pleasure ; but be brief, for it sure. Thou art powerful, and power is is almost the hour of repast, and that beset with temptations. Claudius Pomobstinate Scythian dog to-day has wearied peianus and myself are already old. The me much.

Come, your business ?” world, which thou hast yet to traverse, " Noble emperor,”

said Claudius, lies behind us, past for ever. Our after a moment's pause, “I know not, thoughts are on Elysium, our feet are if thy time be so short and thy body so

On the earth we have fatigued, whether

nothing to hope, we have nothing to Nay, on, Claudius; what disturbs fear, and we come to counsel thy inexthy placid brow ? It looks clouded as perience. Go not to-morrow on the Ætna. Hast thou pardon to ask for

Son of Marcus, emperor of another convict ? a new love.match to Rome, I have held thee in my arms ere

in the grave.

arena.

1

This episode about second marriages deceased sympathies--and there indulge recalls the Widow Wilkins to my mind. in all the “luxury of grief.” One day Never shall I forget her. She was the -one never-to-be-forgotten day-she greatest patroness of matrimony and seduced me to accompany her, attended portrait-painting I ever met with. Her by a brace of her pledges of past happivirgin designation was Higginbottom, ness answering to the names of Mugs but she had exchanged it as she went and Morris. As we proceeded towards through life for that of Thompson, the room fearful forebodings stole upon Johnson, Bradshaw, Mugs, Morris, and me, which were, alas ! too soon realized. Wilkins, to which rather formidable list The Widow Wilkins turned the key of gentlemen she had successively re- and threw open the door. Heavens, signed her heart and hand, so that lat- what a sight met my view ! Not Fatima terly she scarcely knew what her real when she entered Bluebeard's blue name was, and used, in consequence, to chamber could have been more electrimake sad confusion, at times, in her fied. There hung the semblances of the mournful recollections.

deceased Thompson, Johnson, Bradshaw, Lest any venerable spinster should be Mugs, Morris, and Wilkins, with all the overwhelmed with surprise and astonish- little Thompsons, Johnsons, Bradshaws, ment at the marvellous good luck of the Mugs', Morris', and Wilkins ranged in Widow Wilkins, I may just be allowed order due under their respective progenito mention, that she possessed 7001. tors. Gracious powers ! what a crowd a-year in her own right.

of recollections must have rushed upon Besides this, she was by nature of a the widow's memory at such a sight! most lovable temperament; and, if her It was too much for her, and she sank face and person were not of the very overpowered into an

easy chair, and first quality, she made up in quantity, began to heave and shake (so did the being fully the size of any two of her house) most fearfully. She was a bad husbands put together. No one could figure for the pathetic it must be admitsay that the Widow Wilkins “ was no- ted, but let that pass. Meanwhile her thing to look at:"-it would have been two young hopefuls had stationed themmighty difficult to have taken a minia- selves in the centre of the room, and ture of her! Her progeny was almost as regardless of their mother's grief, com. unlimited as herself, ranging somewhere menced puffing dry peas through a tin between twelve and twenty, of all ages, tube at the eyes and noses of the several sizes, and denominations. I mention objects of the widow's regards and regrets these seemingly trivial particulars be- in great style, accompanying every suc. cause of their intimate connexion with cessful shot at a prominent feature with the fine arts, the Widow Wilkins having an exulting shout. I attempted to made it an affectionate rule through life rebuke them, but the widow recovered never to suffer a husband to go out of herself sufficiently to explain to me that the world or a child to come into it, " the poor dear boys were always best without having their portrait taken, and when they had exactly their own way.” a room, of which she alone kept the key, Her tongue once loosened; went, and was set apart for the reception thereof. went, and went! I soon ceased to won, Now Mrs. Wilkins having gone through der at the successive mortality of her so much, and having suffered so many husbands. Such an instrument in conbereavements, and worn such a succes- tinual operation was enough to wear out sion of widow's caps, had naturally any man. In the present case there was accumulated a large quantity of grief no lack of argument. Every glance of more than she could bear-so that when her eye brought up a recollection and she felt herself rather low, she was wont suggested a theme. She described the to have recourse now and then to arti- persons, vouched for the accuracy of the ficial stimulants in order to prevent her likenesses, and enlarged upon the virtues sinking altogether. Taken in modera- of the very extensive range of subjects tion they operated very well, but when before her, interspersing her narrative applied too copiously they used to open with details of all their friends, families, the flood-gates of affliction, and then relatives, and connexions, direct and conaway came her pent-up sorrows, trials, tingent, with a fulness and fluency that and tribulations, like a river bursting its must in a very little time longer have banks and sweeping everything before it. proved fatal to the hardiest and most In these moods she used to proceed to patient of listeners, her beloved portrait-gallery-ber great It wanted a quarter to four as I enstore-house of buried affections and tered that room. It struck seven as she

$

A TALE OF THE SEA.

COURAGE.

turned the key and expressed a hopé stedfast expression upon the new comers that I had been gratified.

to that solitary spot. She was a corpse, My nervous system had been for some and in that apparently resigned and relitime previous to this in rather a shattered gious attitude had been frozen to death. state. Ten days elapsed before I again Beside her was a young man who it apleft my chamber. Ever since I have peared was the brother of the lady, and entertained a very natural, and I trust ex., commander of the brig. He, too, was cusable horror of every-day portraits. C. dead, but sitting at the table, and before

him lay a sheet of paper, upon which he THE ARCTIC REGIONS. bad written the following words— Our

cook has endeavoured since yesterday

morning to strike a light, but in vain ; We take from a very old monthly publi- all is now over.'. At the other side of cation the following extraordinary nar

the cabin stood the cook, with a flint and rative of an adventure in the Polar Seas. steel in his hand, frozen to a statue, in The circumstances are certainly within the vain endeavour to procure that fire the range of possibility, since no putre. which alone could save himself and his faction could take place whilst the bodies companions from the cold arms of death. of the unfortunate sufferers were in the The superstitious terrors of the seamen temperature of a vessel “ encased in now hurried the captain away from the thick-ribbed ice.”

wreck, the log-book alone being brought “ In the spring of the year 1804, a away, and from this it appeared that the whaling vessel sailed from the port of ill-fated vessel was a brig, wlrich had beLondon upon a voyage to the Polar Seas. longed to the port of London, and had Nothing material is said to have occurred sailed for the Arctic regions more than until the arrival in these solitary regions, fourteen years before.when it became the duty of the crew to keep a perpetual look-out upon the hori.

MISCELLANIES. zon in search of fish ; whilst thus occupied, it was fancied by one of the seamen that a sail was discernible as far to the northward as the eye could reach, and as Is corporeal, not mental. It consists the course of the whaler was towards the in a firm, strong texture of the nerves. supposed vessel, a mast became gradually distinguishable amidst the mountains of

The shortness of life makes decision a ice which appeared in that quarter to virtue, which otherwise would be blind bound the sea. It was now summer, obstinacy. Did we live to the age of and the afternoon unusually calm, whilst Methuselah, we could think and re-think, the whaler gradually neared the object decline and resolve, until we had placed in view; the supposition being that it the thing before us in every possible was a vessel engaged in operating upon light; but as it is, we must often jump the blubber, in a bay which would open at a conclusion in the dark. to the view upon approaching nearer to the ice. Upon arriving, however, at the spot, it became clear that the vessel was

Most people, if they were sent in search a wreck, embedded in the ice, and could of misery; would look in the wrong only be approached by a boat. This place. They would pass by palaces, and having been lowered, the captain and search at the hovels of poverty. But several of the seamen landed upon the misery must be estimated, not by the ice, and proceeded to the vessel, which number of adverse accidents, but by the proved to be a brig. The sails were

degree of morbid sensibility of the suf

ferer. furled, very little appeared upon the deck, and all the arrangements were those of a vessel laid up for

a long period

The virtue of a person without prin. of time. Descending to the cabin, the ciple, is something like a warm wind in first object which was seen was a large winter, pleasant enough while it lasts ; Newfoundland dog, coiled upon a mat, but it is here to-day, and gone to-morrow. and apparently asleep. Upon touching the animal it was found to be dead, and All mankind are equally in search of the body frozen to the hardness of a vivid sensations. The young seek them stone. Entering the cabin, was next in love; the old, in avarice; princes, in seen a young lady seated at a table, her war; the people, in sedition; the Chriseyes open, and gazing with a mild and tian, in original plans of benevolence.

DECISION.

MISERY.

PRINCIPLE.

SENSATION.

LONDON: Published by Efingham Wilson, Junior,

16, King William Street, London Bridge, Where communications for the Editor (post paid) will be received.

(Printed by Manning and Smithson, Ivy Lanc.)

OF FICTION, POETRY, HISTORY, AND GENERAL LITERATURE.

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THE FISHERMAN.

He long had left that dangerous life, BY T. MILLER,

And up the river lived alone ; AUTHOR OF “A DAY IN THE woods." A little island on the Trent,

A little but he called his own, (For the Parterre.)

With no companion, save when I, i

A boy, could share his company. John WIMBLE was a fisherman,

Whose locks of iron-grey hung down He loved to row his boat by night, Curling upon his shoulders broad;

When all around the air was still, He had seen threescore winters' frown To bait his hooks, and cast his lines, Above his head on land or sea,

Where shadows deepen'd neath the hill. And was at last moored tranquilly. 'T was then some old sea-stave he'd sing,

That made the silent darkness ring. His face was brown, by winds made hard,

His voice was deep, and clear, and loud, Or seated where the willows waved, And had been heard o'er many a storm, Gazing upon the blue-arched sky,

His brow had also once been proud ; He'd fold his arms in thoughtful mood, But age had left its track behind,

While tears gushed from each deepLike sea-shores worn by wave and wind.

I wondered then, but since that time, A smuggler in his youth was he, Have found how thoughts and feelings Few knew the name he bore when chime.

young ; But of that crew he was the last,

Some deemed he was a surly man; The rest were shot, or drown'd, or hung, But they knew not his griefs and fears, And many a dreadful tale he knew, How he had been beloved by one, Of that swift ship, and fearless crew. Whose image lay“ too deep for tears,"

sunk eye ;

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