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SIR THOMAS BROWN.

SIR WILLIAM TEMPLE.

STORY TELLING.

a profound contemplation of the first standings, if not of their natures, into composer ; there is something in it of question ; for some of the fathers went divinity more than the ear discovers : it so far as to esteen the love of music a is an hieroglyphical and shadowed lesson sign of predestination, as a thing divine, of the whole world and creatures of God and reserved for the felicities of heaven -such a melody to the ear as the whole itself. While this world lasts, I doubt world, well understood, would afford the not' but the pleasure and requests of understanding. In brief, it is a sensible these two entertainments will do so too ; fit of that harmony which intellectually and happy those that content themselves sounds in the cars of God..

with these, or any other so easy and so

innocent, and do not trouble the world There be in music certain figures or or other men, because they cannot be tropes, almost agreeing with the figures quiet themselves, though nobody hurts of rhetoric and with the affections of the them. mind and other senses. First, the division and quavering, which please so much in music, have an agreement with the There is one kind of conversation which glittering of light; as the moon-beams' every one aims at, and every one almost playing upon a wave. Again, the fall- fails in ; it is that of story-telling. I ing from a discord to a concord, which know. not any thing which engages our maketh great sweetness in music, hath attention with more delight, when a peran agreement with the affections, which

son has a sufficient stock of talents necesare reintegrated to the better after some sary for it, such as good sense, true dislikes; it agreeth also with the taste, humour, a clear head, a ready command of which is soon glutled with that which is language, and a variety of proper gesture sweet alone. The sliding from the close to give life and spirit to what he says. or cadence hath an agreement with the If any of these be wanting, the listeners, figure in rhetoric which they call Præter instead of being diverted, are disobliged; expectatum ;. for there is a pleasure even

but, if the person be utterly void of them in being deceived. The reports and all, as is very often the case, he becomes fugues have an agreement with the

a nuisance to the company, and they are figures in rhetoric of repetition and

so long upon the rack as he speaks. It traduction. The triplas and changing has sometimes fallen to my lot that a of times, have an agreement with the

man whom I never offended has laid me changes of motions; as when galliard under the persecution of a long story, time and measure time are in the

medley and compelled me to hear what neither of one dance,

concerned himself, nor me, nor, indeed, Tones are not so apt altogether to anybody else; and, at the same time, procure sleep as some other sounds; as

he was as much in earnest as if both our the wind, the purling of water, humming lives and fortunes, and the felicity of the of bees, a sweet voice of one that readeth, whole kingdom, depended upon what &c. The cause whereof is, for that tones,

he said. because they are equal and slide not, do more strike and erect the sense than the other.

We bear a great deal patiently from those whose abilities we revere, whilst

we wince under the slightest stroke of Poetry and music serve to revive and the rod when it is inflicted by a fool. animate the dead calm of poor or idle

The most amiable men have had their lives, and to allay or divert the violent freaks of tyranny. passions and perturbations of the greatest and the busiest men; and both these Many people pretend to this quality, effects are of equal use to human life. who never made a fortunate guess into I know very well that many who pre: character in their life. tend to be wise by the forms of being They who possess great penetration grave, are apt to despise both poetry and into character, who can trace their secret music as toys or trifles too light for the springs of action, and peep behind the use or entertainment of serious men. curtain of manoeuvring and affectation, But whoever find themselves wholly do not enjoy the drama of human life insensible to these charms, would, I half so much as the ignorant spectator, think, do well to keep their own counsel, who merely gazes on the stage, and for fear of reproaching their tempers and admires the passing splendour of the bringing the goodness of their under- show.

SWIFT.

OPPRESSION.

LORD BACON,

POETRY AND MUSIC.

PENETRATION.

LONDON: Published by Effingham Wilson, Junior, 16, King William Street, London Bridge. Where communications for the Editor (post-paid) will be received.

(Printed by Manning and Smithson, Ivy.lane,)

OF FICTION, POETRY, HISTORY, AND GENERAL LITERATURE,

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THE

wide extent at the base of its ivy covered WOLF OF EHRENBREITSTEIN. rocks, whose tops were surmounted-by

the cloistered halls and towering spires A LEGEND OF THE DRACHENFELS.

of an extensive monastery.

Perhaps the most beautiful description (For the Parterre).

of the Rhinish scenery, is contained in

the following lines. Here Ehrenbreitstein, with her shattered wall,

“The castled crag of Drachenfels Black with the miners' blast, upon her height

Frowns' o'er the wide and winding Rbine, Yet sbews of what she was, when shell and ball

Whose breast of waters broadly swells, Rebounding idly on her strength, did light;

Between the banks which bear the vine,
A tower of victory! from whence the flight

And bills all rich with blossonied trees,-
Of baffled foes was watched along the plain:
But peace destroyed what war could never And scattered cities crowning these,

And fields which promise coru and wine, blight,

Whose far white walls along them shine ; And laid those proud roofs bare to summer rain, On which the idle shower for years had poured With double joy wert thou with me.

Have strewn a scene which I should see, in vain.

Childe Harold.
On the banks of the Rhine, between The river nobly foams and flows,

The charm of this enchanted ground,
Coblentz and St. Goar, is situated the And all its thousand twines disclose
Paradise of Germany the Drachenfels, Some fresher beauty varying round;
celebrated for the terrific grandeur and

The haughtiest breast its wish might bound, picturesque beauty of the surrounding Through life to dwell delighted here :

Nor could on earth a spot be found, scenery.

To nature and to me so dear,
The ruined castles on its heights, the hills Could thy dear eyes in following mine,

Still sweeten more these banks of Rbine." rich with trees, the plains strewed with

Byron's Childe Harold. vineyards and cornfields, interspersed with the whitened walls and rustic steeples of At the time to which this story rethe neighbouring villages, and the nobly lates, the laws enacted for the restrainflowing majestic Rhine is stretched to a ing society within the limits of modera

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tion, were badly framed, and in a worse On the Crag of Drachenfels, commanner applied, for seldom could a man, manding an extensive view of the Rhine, requiring justice of his fellow, obtain and of the delightful country through redress, save when he demanded it with which it winds its rapid course, is still to a few score of armed retainers at his be seen the ruined walls once forming back.

part of the proud baronial castle of Among the many abuses, attending Count Hugo d'Arnstein; after a brief such a state of affairs, the attacks of but active campaign he had retired from might and strength were formidably the bustle and fatigue of war, to spend frequent against right, and the ruined his days in the bosom of his family, which castles of the vanquished nobles afforded consisted of a beloved wife and the surfit strongholds for numerous bands of vivor of four daughters. robbers through the country, from which Adela d'Arnstein was at that time in it was a matter of no small difficulty to her ninth year; her fair flaxen hair fell dislodge them; and whence they made in natural ringlets over a neck of snowy frequent descents on the surrounding whiteness, her large blue eyes sparkled country, pillaging and destroying where with vivacity peculiar to her years, and ever they came.

with her rosy cheeks and dimpled chin, One of the most dreaded of these annexed to a certain gaieté de coeur, hordes, was commanded by a man, whose obvious in every feature, presented one inhuman ferocity and savage manners, of the most engaging countenances it is had procured for him the soubriquet of possible to conceive; her disposition was “ The Wolf,” and from his residence, remarkable for sweetness, and she repaid he was commonly called the “Wolf of the fondness of her parents with the love Ehrenbreitstein;" a name, with which of an affectionate heart. bloody deeds and acts of cruelty were Years rolled on, and the child of yes. coupled, and which inspired the neigh- terday had ripened into womanhood; the bouring inhabitants with such dread, infantine graces which had embellished that the village matrons used to frighten her childhood, were now mātured by the refractory children into obedience by bloom of youth: she was standing in the mentioning it: in fine no one was safe lovely vale of the Drachenfels, accomfrom the daring incursions of those re- panied by one, in whom were centred morseless bands, but those powerful all the graces of manly beauty. nobles who could secure themselves from He was young, fine expressive features; attack by betaking them to their strongly and an athletic yet symmetrical form, fortified castles.

his glossy hair hung in luxuriant curls The fortress possessed by this outlaw, from beneath the folds of his high Hun though partly in ruins, was enriched by garian cap, over his shoulders was flung all that could make it picturesque and his quiver, while the bright steel barbs beautiful, and withal strongly defended; it and the hilt of his sword glittered in the belonged to one of the most noble fami- rays of the setting sun: in one hand be lies in the province, who were forced to was holding his curved bow, and the fly before the present occupier. Yet other supported Adela.. report whispered that the lady of the And each clasped by an arm, murdered lord, together with his infant Yielded to fair súðset: lovely charm. son, were remaining, but so closely con: The valley around them was in the fined that nothing transpired beyond the form of an amphitheatre, 'in the 'mistý immediate attendants.

distance were seen the cloud-capt Alps This.magnificent "castle was boldly towering aloft, while the Hartz Forest perched on the summit of a gigantic and threw a gloomy shade from its vast ex. pinnacled rock, which throws a darkened tent," and the mouldering battlements of shadow over the blue waters beneath; an aneient castle blackening in the shade,

the were cowering on the rock immediately shelving benches, fringe its gloomy with bright overhanging boughs, and the As the last roșy liņts of the expiring rock was so steep, that' on three sides it day had faded from the heavens, the was inaccessible, and so artfully defended glorious moon arose, streaking each on the other, that it could not be ap- gentle hill and slight ascent with a bar proached except by one path. This of silvery light; the whole scene was in avenue or pass was guarded by a vigilant perfect harmony with the lovely beings sentinel, who being on an elevated situa- whọ beheld' it, and occasionally swelling tion, could descry any one at a great dise on the ear, like the pealing tones of tance, and if an enemy, summon the a rich organ, the convent bells vere garrison to its defence.

trees and shrubs springing out of base above them.I on vampiredit

wafted on the breeze. As the bells and fierceness, his tusks were projecting were heard, Adela as if struck with the out of his enormous jaws like the flukes lateness of the hour, gently withdrew her of an anchor, several of the best dogs arm from her companion, saying,

were crushed beneath the weight of his “ Farewell Ernest, the sun has sunk huge carcass, and the rest of the boar behind the western hills, 't is time I hounds yelped fearfully at a distance; no should depart."

oné had the temerity to cast his spear, “Oh! Adela,” the youth exclaimed, and all were literally at bay, when the with a sigh, “would that the time was horse of Adela, impatient at being recome, when we might meet to part no strained, bounded forward, bearing her more; but surely I may see thee to thy within a few yards of the beast, who father's domain, wouldst thou deny me instantly made a rush, and the horse that pleasure?"

with its rider rolled on the ground: “ No Ernest," was the reply, “ but why happily she escaped the fall, but it was not demand from my father his daughter only to be torn asunder, as the boar was in marriage-methinks you have some preparing for a fresh attack, when the elaim on his kindness."

Count in the eagerness of parental affec"I am not my own master,” said the tion, ran on foot to his daughter's succour. youth,“ would that I was; but (added He succeeded in transfixing him with he as they walked through the paths of his spear, but only roused his fierceness ; the forest to the castle of Count d'Arn- rushing from his fallen prey, he made stein), for the sake of one dear to me, towards the Count, who alone stood to I am as yet in a state of dependence, and brave the rage of the infuriated animal, as such could not expect to obtain thy without the slightest aid from any of the hand."

terrified hunters; their attention was now When within sight of the postern too absorbed in the frightful position of gate Adela would not suffer him to pro- the father and child, to be able to render ceed further, and after again bidding the slightest assistance to either, and adieu, with a promise of a speedy meet- both would have inevitably perished (as ing, tripped lightly forward; the youth the boar was now within less than ten retired into the recesses of the wood, and yards of his victim), had not a young they were soon concealed from each man rushed from a neighbouring thicket, other's sight.

and with the rapidity of lightning threw Let us go back two months.

himself between the person of the Count Count Hugo d'Arnstein, accompanied and the advancing beast, then dropping by a party of friends, some old brothers on one knee, holding his bright boar in arms, went to chase the wild boar in

spear firmly forward, awaited in that the Hartz Forest ; it was usual in those position 'the nearer approach of the days for ladies to take a prominent part animal. in every display of manly sport.

With the weight of a falling mountain, Among those who presided at sylvan the savage monster rolled on the plain, duties on that day, none was so con- his broad forehead being, through his own spicuous, either from the beauty of her impetuosity, completely perforated by the countenance, heightened by the flush of opposing weapon, while Count d'Arnstein fexpectation when engaged in the peril- falling on his knees, prayed aloud to ous sport, or the unrivalled elegance of heaven, blessing the preserver of his own her form, and the grace with which she life, and far dearer to him, the life of his reined her pawing courser, as Adela daughter: the first impulse of the stranger d'Arnstein. She was the first to throw youth, after defeating the wild boar, was her light javelin at the boar as he slug- to disentangle the fallen Adela from her gishly rose from his leafy den, and it horse. was to her that the successful cavalier

Bearing his lovely burthen to the arms in triumph presented the bristly head, of her father, who after repeatedly thankhaving succeeded in destroying him. ing for his timely assistance, invited him

They had now penetrated far into the to return to his castle, where in a more wild forest, having deprived many of its suitable manner than mere words, he native burghers of life, and began to think would shew his gratitude. of returning, when the barking of the Adela, who in speechless sorrow had dogs announced a fresh opponent. They witnessed the almost certain death of her alt made for the cover when ce the noise father, full of joy for his deliverance, proceeded, and beheld á monster that joined her entreaties: the stranger politely made the stoutest heart tremble.

declined the invitation, and retired. He was a wild boar of immense size From that eventful day, the graceful

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demeanour, and unfinching courage of The young man knelt down and the stranger youth, were the principal pressed to his lips the outstretched hand, topics of conversation at the castle of the and receiving the proffered gift, ex. Drachenfels; and whoever spoke of these, claimed, was sure to find an ardent listener in the “I thank you lady, and I shall conyouthful Adela; they were the theme of sider it the brightest day of my life, that her tongue by day, and the subject of on which I went to hunt in the gloomy her nightly dreams: the better to dwell shades of the Hartz Forest.” alone on these thoughts, she used to take They met repeatedly thenceforward. solitary walks in that immediate part of

I resume my broken narrative. the Hartz Forest skirting the village, to Shortly after Adela and Ernest had which one of the gates directly communi- separated, the one to proceed to her cated.

father's domain, the other to retrace his One evening she had pursued her steps through the Hartz Forest, Adela walk longer than usual, she was alarmed became alarmed by the clatter of horses at hearing two voices, talking in one of approaching at a quick pace, and before the paths of the wood, which after a she could reach the gate she was roughly short distance, diverged on that which seized by one of the horsemen, who she occupied, so that she could distinctly with the greatest ease lifted her up before hear the following conversation.

him on the horse, saying, “When will he be home?”

“ Ho! ho! my pretty mistress, you “That, my lord, is hard to tell, but I have been enjoying the moonlight I pray thee don't delay,"

perceive; come along, you shall have I shall not delay," was the reply, more night than day I warrant ye;" and and one of the party retired.

off they galloped to the towers of 'Twas with a cry of joy that Adela Ehrenbreitstein. greeted her deliverer when he met her Adela was taken off her horse more sight. The stranger anxiously inquired dead than alive, and lifted into the courtwhether her health had not suffered yard by the person who had seized her, from her fright, and also how her father from whence she was taken into a damp was?

poisome dungeon, where she was left for She replied that both were well, and the remainder of the night. wished much for the pleasure of his The morning rose heavily ; Adela was society.

still stretched on the cold floor, bereft of He silently shook his head, and they motion, when the door creaked on its walked through the wood in the direction hinges, and in stalked the Wolf of Ehof the Drachenfels.

renbreitstein. When passing through its beauteous He was a tall, ruffianly looking man, vale, both for an instant paused to view immense black whiskers, and moustaits splendid scenery.

chios; his little eyes burned tiercely, and “This is really a charming place," a large scar on his forehead gave a said Adela, “I will come here often.” hideous expression to his savage appear.

“I think so too; when do you pur- ance; Adela was roused at his sight, and pose being here ?” timidly inquired the retreated to the most distant part of the youth.

dungeon, where to prevent herself from If possible to-morrow, at sunset," falling, she was forced to lean against its answered Adlela. They proceeded to the dreary wall. verge of the forest, and were going to The robber at length asked her how separate.

she liked her lodging, adding, that he “ If not presuming too much, Adela de knew well who she was, and in order to Arnstein would wish much to know the recompense her father for baving slain name of her deliverer.”

one of his best men, he made up his “ Lady,” said he, " what interest could mind if ever he got her in his power to one so noble as you take in the name of marry her, which he said was his intena stranger, whom accident has destined tion on the fourth day, when he expected worthy to serve you ; nevertheless I will to return laden with booty for the marnot refuse--my name is Ernest.” riage feast. With this comfortable assu

“ Receive this then from me Ernest,” rance, he left her stupefied by this said she (as she placed in his hand a unexpected calamity, (for she supposed small chain of her own hair, entwined she would have been held to ransom) with gold ;) “ and with it believe me and knew not what to do ; her thoughts accompanies the prayers of him, and her, recurred from her parents, who would you nobly succoured,"

be overpowered by grief at the loss of

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