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their only child, to Ernest, who might pliance with her request, and exhorted deem himself accessory to her being car- her to support her spirits—that all would ried off. Oh! how happy would she be, yet be well, tenderly bade adieu, could he be there to aid her! Scarcely The non-appearance of Adela at the had the last thought struck her mind, Castle of Drachenfell created an alarm when again she heard the harsh grating which may easily be conceived ; while of the dungeon door, and beheld, not the various dangers suggested themselves to gaunt form of the robber, but the fine the minds of her terrified parents, as manly form of Ernest! Full of wonder the probable cause of her absence ;-that at his sudden appearance---so abrupt, so

she had been without the demense was unexpected-she appeared for some time evident, from the circumstance of a veil doubtful of the reality of his presence. having been found, which was recol

He briefly explained the occasion of lected to have been worn by her on the his visit ; alleging, as time was precious, preceding evening, therefore a party of he could not delay.

were appointed to traverse the “ Adela requested he would gratify country in quest of her, her by telling her who he was.

This vain movement was however If you wish to hear a short story frustrated by the arrival of a stranger at you may learn.

the castle; he had been seen from the “I am the only son of the late Baron watch-tower, advancing at a rapid pace; Von Herman, rightful proprietor of this when he approached, he demanded incastle. I well remember the attack by stantly to see the Count, as he had imthe robber, who is called the Wolf of portant tidings to communicate : he was Ehrenbreitstein:' my father, surrounded shewn into a saloon where the Count by bis valiant serfs, defended themselves and Countess d'Arnstein were silently gallantly. An entrance having been praying the protection of heaven for obtained, the ruffians mastered the men, their absent child. and my heroic father was slain by the When the youth entered, the Count sword of their brutal leader, in defence instantly recognised him as their preof his home and family. My mother, server, and having embraced him, pretogether with me, was taken: I was at sented him to the Countess. “ You have that time eight years old, and was con- heard doubtless of the dreadful disapfined with her in a distant moss-covered pearance of our beloved child," said the tower.

Count. “We seldom saw our victor : he did Yes Sir," replied Ernest, “and I not mind, since he had gained his end. have seen her within half-an-hour." It was said, at least he spread the report, “Where, oh! where is my Adela,“ that he was rightful possessor of Ehren- cried both earnestly, “can we see her ?" breitstein, by marriage with the lady of “ That I am afraid,” he said, “ will be the late lord, my father ; but nothing no easy matter, but we must determine could be more untrue. We passed our

what is best to be done.” days in retirement. A holy man who had He then informed her father, that been chaplain to the castle during my unless released within four days, his father's lifetime, by some means had daughter would be wife of the Wolf of contrived to get into the service of the Ehrenbreitstein, that it would require a present cruel occupier, chiefly with the strong force to secure the passes, but motive of superintending my education; that he would engage to facilitate the and through his means I have been entrance. allowed to leave this castle, when our The unhappy parents blessed the youth, jailor is on one of his predatory excur- and the Count vowed that if his daughter sions. It was on one of these leaves of was released from the power of the robabsence, that I have been fortunate ber knight, she should become the wife enough to save you from peril, which I of her gallant defender. shall ever consider the most fortunate man, overpowered with joy, departed occurrence of my life; and if a second with a fixed determination either to set time succeed I shall be supremely Adela free, or dié in the attempt. Ho happy."

appointed that the friar, his tutor (who Adela informed him of the dreadful lived as a soldier in the service of the determination of their victor, and his robber), should guard the avenue, and resolve of marriage, and entreated him have a free passage in that quarter, and as he valued her affection to lose no time resolved that he himself should open the in communicating with her friends. main gate, from whence the other de. Ernest, having promised immediate come fences might be easily carried.

The young The third day had already passed in foiling the attempt; and drawing a pisa gloomy anticipation, and Adela had re- tol from his girdle, was in the act of tired to rest with a heavy heart, when raising it at the breast of the gentle and the shrill and repeated sounding of a passive Adela, when with the rapidity of horn at the outer gate, announced the lightning a sabre stroke descended on arrival of the dreaded captain and his the ruffian's head, which cleft to his very ruffian band, with shouts of savage brain-he fell dead to the ground, and triumph, that reached even the agonised the unused weapon dropped from his soul of the lone tenant of the dungeon: hand! The robbers having lost their they told of many a ruthless deed leader, were easily vanquished, and Ercommitted during their excursion, and nest Von Herman having revenged the displayed the spoil to celebrate their death of his father, on the despoiler of chieftain's wedding on the following day; their house, and having released his beand long and earnestly that dreary night trothed Adela from the merciless robber, on the cold floor stones of her cell, did went with the joyful tidings to his capAdela entreat the bounteous hand of the tive mother, who fully participated in Almighty to protect and comfort her.

all his joy. The following morning, pale with In due time the castle was repaired, watching, Adela arose ; the sun played and Ernest restored to all his hereditary cheerfully through the massy grating of estates and honours; he did not remain the prison, and the little birds, futtering long without baving a sharer for them, round the ivy-mantled walls, seemed as whose name it is needless to mention. if trying to divert her, but only increased Nothing could exceed the splendour of her melancholy, when she recollected the marriage feast, all the guests of both how free as they she sported through the castles were received with Faus un flowery meadows of her native village, Braus, and a numerous and distinguished or rambled with her companions by the progeny fully testified the panegyric at banks of the lovely streams, that bursting their death, which states that “ They with a torrent's Aow, sweep from the lived happy and died lamented.” hills, and gently meandering through

RODERICK. her father's domains, and uniting with the majestic Rhine, are lost in the ima mensity of ocean. Thence what a change!

RETORT OF NAPOLEON. now abandoned to the power of a cruel When Napoleon was only an officer villain, torn from her friends; and the of artillery, a Prussian officer said in his uncertainty of their being able to pro- presence with much proudness : My eure any force sufficient to combat him, countrymen fight only for glory, and overpowered her weakened spirits to

Frenchmen fight for money.”—“ You such a degree that she sank to her

are right,” replied Napoleon, “ each of wretched couch in a state of insensibility. them fight for what they are in want of.”

When she awoke, she found herself supported between her father and Ernest, while a strange lady Mr. D-, wearied at the inattention was applying restoratives to bring her to of his servant, said to him, one dayher senses. When she beheld her father Valentine, thou shalt dine to-morrow she uttered a thankful prayer, and re- at my table, in this very dining-room. quested to be taken to her mother, which " Sir, you do me too much honour, was accordingly done.

replied he.-" Thou shalt dine alone, During her faint, her dungeon door and I will serve thee."

“ Ah, sir, you was opened, and entered by the robber are jesting with a poor servant, whose and his attendants, who carried their zeal and devotedness are well known to unresisting victim to their profane cere- you.”—“ Poh! zeal is quite out of the mony, where a burlesque altar stood, question; I tell thee I will wait upon ready provided with a mock priest. The thee myself, with the napkin under my sacrilegious marriage had just com- arm; but mind, if the next day, thou menced, when their devotions were dis- do'st not recollect how I wish to be turbed by the clash of swords from the waited upon, I will turn thee away from old court-yard, and the chapel was soon

As was said, was done, filled by the victorious party, in which and, since that time, Mr. D— is served Ernest was conspicuous.

as he wishes to be. The saturnalia of The robber instantly guessing that it the ancients were instituted with that was the rescue of his purposed bride, intention. Those were the good old resolved to have the gratification of times of masters and servants.

ADVICE TO MASTERS.

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my service."

THE LILY

Familiar Floral Sketches. applied either to the white lily or the

tulip, neither of which grows wild in OF JERUSALEM.

Palestine. It is natural to suppose that (Amaryllis Lutea.)

the Divine Teacher, according to his Natural Order, Liliaceae,

usual custom, called the attention of his Linnean, Hexandria Monogynia. hearers to some object near at hand; and

as the fields of Palestine are over-run In the wane of the year, while the with the amaryllis lutea, whose golden richest blossoms of autumn are hasten- liliacious blossoms afford collectively ing to their fall, we commence the one of the most brilliant and gorgeous floral illustration of our Parterre, in views in nature, the expression of “Solofull confidence that the bounty of nature mon in all his glory not being arrayed will furnish a sufficient number of her like one of these,” is peculiarly approsílken tribes, who love to blossom on priate. I consider the feeling with the wintry air, to make our progress an which this was expressed, as the highest agreeable one, till spring will shower a honour ever done to the study of plants ; profusion of treasures perplexing to the and if my botanical conjecture be right, choice of the florist.

we learn a chronological fact respecting We give deserved precedence to the the season of the year when the Sermon amaryllis lutea, for, of all the flowers of on the Mount was delivered.” the field, she has been most highly After this explanation there cannot be favoured, being indisputably the lily of a doubt as to which of the liliucea is the Jerusalem, to which our Saviour alluded true lily of Jerusalem. This hallowed in bis Sermon on the Mount. We have blossom is at present in its prime, and excellent authority for declaring that the those of our readers who require some amaryllis lutea was really this sacred lily, inducement for taking a healthful country for these are the words of the late walk, may make a pilgrimage to some lamented professor of botany, Sir James of our metropolitan nursery-grounds, Edward Smith.

in search of this “sweet flower of Pales“ There is a celebrated text of great tine.” At this season of the year-in

uty, to which I have ventured to ap- this identical week, it is, or ought ply a botanical elucidation. Our Sa- blooming in the open air. For the viour says to his disciples, Consider the small outlay of sixpence, our botanical Hilies of the field.' This is commonly pilgrim may bring home the floral trea.

ex.

sure-root, leaves, and blossoms ; form and habits of the crocus and the amine it at leisure, and compare it with narcissi, while its botanical construction our drawing. Well worth the scrutiny marks it a lily, it is among the most it is. We have given its form and out- interesting occupations of the botanical line: we will now tell the other tokens florist to investigate these affinities. by which it may be recognised. The The corolla, or flower-cup of the amaamaryllis lutea has long dark-green ryllis lutea, is divided into six petals, leaves polished like satin, of a colour and which are all united at the termination texture very uncommonly seen in bulb. of the blossom in the above-mentioned ous-rooted plants, which usually send tube. Like most whole-cupped flowers forth blue or glaucous green leaves the petals do not fly off, but wither of loose substance, and with lateral round the germen. The liliacious necveins, very different from the somewhat tarism may be observed in the valve, vascular consistence of those of this running down the midrib of each petal. amaryllis. This dark verdure is beauti- In Norfolk and Suffolk the amaryllis fully contrasted by its paly-gold flowers, lutea is often seen in all sorts of gardens, which are of the most delicate and vel. being cultivated out of love to the mevety consistence—they look like canary mory of Sir J. E. Smith, who first birds converted into flowers. The habits noticed its connexion with Scripture. and form of the lily of Jerusalem bear It was introduced in England as early as some resemblance to the crocus; but the the days of old Tradescant ; at present class and order, and the spatha situated it is very rare in the gardens round the on the green foot-stalk, and the some- metropolis, though it deserves, being what sidelong inclination of the petals, very easy of culture, to make its annual point it out as belonging to that family autumnal appearance as profusely as the of lilies which are called amaryllis ;-yet daffodil, the crocus, and hepatica do in this lily is certainly the link between ihe our spring borders. In Miller, and liliacious and the crocus tribes. It ap- other old garden books, it is called the pears first above ground nearly at the autumnal narcissus-lily. When the same time with the autumnal crocuses, blossoms die away, the leaves have at the latter end of September, putting scarcely attained their growth; they forth several of the said green-ribbon continue to increase in length and leaves. In the centre of these groups breadth through the winter, till the appears a white pouch, that looks as if longest attain the length of five inches, made of tissue paper ;-as this grows and half an inch in width ; they are higher, about two inches, the green marked by an indented crease down the footstalk ascends. The spátha at last centre, and are almost of the firm shining rends, and out comes a delicate yellow consistence and net-work texture of everbud, that soon expands, and lasts several green leaves ; and therefore we deem days in beauty. Only one flower abides these plants rather a stumbling-block to in each of the pouches, but there is a the exclusive partizans of the natural succession of these receptacles, that push system. These leaves of evergreen are up one after the other through the au- very ornamental in winter, when verdure

If the reader rips up the tube is scarce among herbaceous plants. of the flower, beginning at the spatha or About April, yellow spots appear on the paper-like calyx, the following is the surface of the leaves ; and in May, they appearance that will present itself ;- die down and disappear.

The new Six anthers, which classes it hexandria, root of the plant is then perfectly formed, and confirms it as belonging to the lily and they may be taken up and transtribe. These anthers surround one tri. planted, or laid by till July. If the angular headed pistil, which descends roots be disturbed before the leaves die through the tube of the corolla till it away, like all other bulbs the plant remeets the white spatha-calyx. Having sents such treatment. The amaryllis but one pistil, the plant is placed in the lutea from which this description was order monogynia. In the crocus, the taken did not bloom for three years, betubular termination of the corolla that cause it was transplanted when the leaves encloses the pistil reaches to the ground, were green.

When pleased with its and nearly to the root of the plant. In situation, it throws up a great number of the amaryllis lutea this curious prolonga- off-sets, which, if undisturbed, bloom tion of the corolla only reaches to the the next year. It does not like the calyx, situated like those of the jonquils drip of trees nor the shade of a wall, -high on the footstalk. Thus we find but increases very freely in any sunny this beautiful amaryllis partakes of the situation ; and is most beautiful when

tumn.

was

many of its bulbs are congregating to. Gaul, Dacia, and Britain, Syria, Phegether, giving a glorious golden glow to nicia and Palestine, Cæsariensis and the ground for many feet near them, Tingitana, added their tributes. and calling to mind in autumn the beau- As the golden hues of the dying day ties that struck the eye of our Saviour faded from the luminous heavens, when it carpeted the valley of Jehosa- only to give place to other light more phet, and the hollows of the Mount of enchanting. One after another silently Olives.

came forth the soft, burning stars, and Like many of our bulbous-rooted the full moon rose above the high' edge flowers, particularly the liliaceae, many of the Coliseum, and sent its silver flood of whom, as in the instance of the over the city. Already a huge crowd typical queen of the tribe, the stately had gathered about the amphitheatre, white lily, are natives of the east ; differ consisting of workmen and slaves preence of climate seems to make little varia- paringfor the sports of the morrow; for, tion in the season of flowering ; the in honour of the imperial gladiator, many amaryllis lutea, with us, is a late au. additions were to be made to the furnitumnal flower—in Palestine, an early ture of the fierce and giant temple of one. Yet, the later it condescends to pleasure. The ordinary nets, designed bloom in autumn, the more precious is as a defence against the wild beasts, its addition to our list of flowers; and it were displaced by others of golden wire; often sheds its golden beauties on the the porticoes were to be gilded; the dismal days of November, realizing the belt or circle which divided the several words of Percival, the American poet:- ranks of spectators, was to be studded

with mosaic of beautiful and precious I found that lily's bloom When the day was dark and chill;

stones, and the other decorations of gold, It smiled like a star in the misty gloom,

silver and amber, were not yet quite And it breathed a soft perfume,

completed. Then many of the multiWhich is floating around me still.

tudes had acquired permission to see the For I'd found out a sweet green spot

interior of the wonderful structure, and • Where that lily was blooming fair; the crowd was swelled by strangers who The din of the city disturbed it not,

had never before been in Rome, and the But the spirit that shades the quiet cot With its wings of love was there.

slaves were conveying the wild beasts to their dens in the edifice; in short, the

whole area around the theatre itself, and A TRUE TALE OF THE

by the arch of Titus, and even the Forum, COLISEUM.

and the steps up the Capitoline hill, and all the accessible parts of the Palatine were completely occupied by the people, although not to such a degree as to pre

vent their wandering about, except in Even on the day previous to that ap- the immediate vicinity of the Coliseum. pointed for the display of the imperial Upon the balcony of a marble palace, skill in the amphitheatre, the whole city which overlooked the crowd, the Coliwas in motion. Not only the throngs seum, and several adjoining open parts within the walls, but also multitudes of the city, there sat two individuals from the Campagna, came pouring alone. They were aged men, and as through the gates.

they reclined on couches upon the marThe establishment of the emperor was, ble portico, while the liquid sound of of itself, immense in number, and dazz- falling water from a near fountain came ling in magnificence; the brilliantly cool and grateful to their ears, they arrayed pretorians alone amounting to seemed enjoying the scene, and, at the twenty thousand. These, with courtiers, same time, engaged in conversation. senators and other officers of the empire, No one was within reach of their voices. with their household, slaves, etc., were The long hall, into which the balcony seen, some rolling in gorgeous equipages led, was empty. It was the palace of through the streets-some lounging at Claudius Pompeianus, and this venerathe doors and porticos--some reclining ble lord, with his aged mate, Pertinax, in the baths and forums. As the huge was there- - two old Romans - really sun lay broad and dimmed upon the virtuous, enlightened, and alone. western mountains, all came forth to “I know not,” said Claudius, in rebreathe the cool freshness of the evening. ply to a remark which his friend had To the general throngs now abroad in previously made; “it is but lately, as the high, narrow streets, Spain, Egypt, old age crept over my limbs, and my

PART THE SECOND.

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