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tous difficulty overcome. The obelisk in their hands, rushed up the ladders, arose majestically from the ground, and and thoroughly soaked the cordage. without the slightest accident.

Fontana was himself again, his energies The bell had resounded for the fiftieth seemed not only restored, but redoubled; time; the enormous mass had reached he was to be seen at all points, giving the edge of the pedestal; it must be bis orders with that calmness, that prelifted yet higher-raised, suspended in sence of mind which, in the moment of the air, in order to descend with a plomb a crisis, are the characteristics of supeupon its die. ..

rior minds. For the last time he waved The bell tolled, and the colossal slab his flag, casting at the same time a look remained balanced in the air upwards of towards his beautiful betrothed ;-the twenty feet from the ground. Antonia bell recommenced tolling; and soon the ventured to cast a look towards her lover; giant monalithe descended majestically her joy was ineffable at seeing hope de- upon its pedestal ! picted upon his countenance; but at the The architect remained absorbed for a very moment whilst abandoning herself moment in a species of stupor, without to the most delicious reverie, she fell the power of uttering a single word. back again into all the mortal agony Antonia, overcome with ecstatic joy, of despair. She saw her beloved grow fell upon her knees, raising her hands pale, and let the flag drop from his trem- towards heaven. bling hands. All beside herself, she The old artisan, trembling with emorushed into his arms, the tears gushing tion, seized the flag and attached it to a from her eyes. This harrowing scene rope; a moment afterwards a crimson produced a sorrowful impression upon banner streamed like a bright meteor the spectators; there was not one among above the tapering summit of the obelisk. them who, from the bottom of his soul, At the same instant the bell of the did not curse the barbarous inflexibility capitol blended its silver tone with the of Sixtus.

humming peals of the other churches. An old carpenter who had placed him- The populace no longer repressed its self beside the architect, furtively whis. transports; thousands of voices shouted pered to him :

"viva Fontana! viva Lemaestro !"... “ Signior! I understand this business ! In the midst of the general enthusiasm, the ropes are relaxing--you fear lest they arose audible murmur:-“ Here should break, and the enterprise fail : comes the pope! here comes Sixtus the listen to me; behind the cathedral there Fifth !” Every head was turned is a horse waiting for you, fly!-save towards the balcony of the cathedral.

“Kneel, kneel !” repeated the crowd. “No!” replied Fontana, with a qui. Sixtus the Fifth appeared upon the vering voice; “ I have given my word; balcony, the tiara upon his head, and I will not break it; I will stay and die !" surrounded by all the eclat of pontificial

What words can paint the despair of power. He extended his hands over Antonia! her betrothed was there, near the prostrate populace, and gave it his to her, with pale and distorted visage ; benediction; and at that solemn moment his limbs trembling beneath him, and the artillery of the castle of St. Angelo opposite stood the terrible functionary, gave a detonating salvo. who was soon about to end this horrible When all was ended, a voice proceed. agony. Lost, and well nigh frantic,- ing from the crowd, made itself heard ; not knowing how to reanimate the failing _" To the Vatican ! let us carry Maespowers of her lover, she shrieked almost tro Fontana to the Vatican !” mechanically

The enthusiastic people followed the “ Water! water!”

advice, and despite his resistance, the At the same instant, a sudden inspi. maestro was carried in triumph, as far as ration, a miraculous force, as it were, the palace, in the arms of his fellow. restored to the architect all his wonted citizens. energy! He raised his head erect, and Fontana on entering the apartment of cried with a loud voice,

the holy father, threw himself upon his “ Water ! bring water ! sprinkle the knees; but Sixtus, raising him with beropes !"..

nignity, extended his hand, whilst he thus Antonia and the old carpenter re- addressed him ; mained motionless with surprise. All “You have worthily fulfilled your task; around eagerly hastened to execute the I will worthily recompense you! From order ; casks of water were quickly to-day you are a Roman knight, and you brought; the workmen, with pitchers have a pension of a thousand ducats from

an

your life !"

.

was

sing;

the treasury ;-I shall find means of on the green banks that girded the rivers, employing your talents.”

while they smiled and conversed with Fontana made obeisance and withdrew the sons and daughters of Adam. from the audience of the Holy Father Adoliah, the young wife of Normas, in a state of mind more easily to be as bashful as she was beautiful; imagined than depicted.

and whenever the heavenly strangers Eight days afterwards he was the happy alighted before their vine-bower, she husband of the beautiful Antonia. A welcomed them in with downcast eyes. long prosperity was the reward for that Long and frequent were their visits, and terrible trial to which he was subjected. pure and instructing the discourse with

SUTHERLAND, M. which they wiled away the happy hours.

Still Adoliah had never gazed on their THE EVENING WIND. faces, for she deemed those eyes which

confronted the hallowed brow of the Om(For the Parterre.)

nipotent, too holy for her to glance upon.

But one afternoon in summer, wbile Gusts of the Evening-come! come! seated in the arbour with Normas and Usher the dead Day to his tomb; Solrembah, who belonged to the order Hollow and high your requiem pour, of guardian angels, the full sun streamed Now with a whisper, and then with a upon her face, and the celestial visitor, roar.

who sat at the entrance of the bower, Round the thick elm-boughs sweep, and perceiving that its beams were over.

powering, outspread his silver wings, and In the Hall porch your wild chime ring; screened the heat from her lovely features. Howl through the village street, and Hitherto her eyes had been wandering range

through the opening of the arbour, upon Round the striped gables of the Grange. the roses and myrtles that grew around, Mysterious hiss in the old bell-wheel, or catching the gorgeous colours of some That scowls so grim in the campanile; large butterfly, or splendid hummingScud through the corbelled arch, with a bird, as they crossed each other in the groan,

sunshine. Might challenge the belfry's loudest But now that beautiful wing, spreadtone;

ing tan-like, nearly obstructed her view, And bid the old pollard-oak beware

and she could not avoid gazing upon Of the tumble-down forge that's under it, as its transparent featherings glithis care!

tered in the sun-light. Long did she And hold thy wake where the villagers admire the fine net-work that appeardo,

ed covered with blossoming silver, and Where church-tower, cote, and granary then her eyes fell upon the snowy too,

shoulder which vested its beautiful roundPiled irregular round, embrace

ness in the softened shadow of that ra. A sloping, soft, and verdant space. diant pinion. That evening she watched There wail and whine most dismally,– the dove-like form of Solrembah, as he 'Tis a mark of respect to the widowed sped above the rosy hues of sunset, on sky!

his way to heaven, and that night she But do it betimes, as the twilight pale sighed, and wished that her Normas had Drops o'er the mourner a sacred veil, wings. Still she loved her husband And garden and orchard, croft and beyond every other object upon earth; wood,

but the angels she adored as sacred Sympathize with her widowhood; beings, which she could kneel to, and Ay! do it betimes, for she'll soon be worship, as she bowed to her invisible gay,

Creator, and “Oh !” she said, “ if NorConsoled by the Stars for the death of mas were as radiant, I would worship the Day!

him too." Thus passed days, and she Whitenash, May 11th, 1835.

had now gazed times innumerable upon

the celestial faces of her visitors; and NOTES OF A READER. when she stood hand in hand with her

husband to sing the evening hymn, she Once upon a time angels dwelt among wished that his voice was as musical as mankind, winnowing their way as they Solrembah's. But oh! it was a piteous willed it, to the flowery earth, or to the wish, for then she deemed it would be blue domes of heaven. Often might more acceptable to her Maker. Still their radiant forms be seen outstretched she loved Normas, although she sat

HORACE GUILFORD,

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oftener beside the guardian angel in her trifling occasions. Whereupon he told bower than before time, and heard not her father, that it was his opinion that all that her husband now said, for her her ladyship stood more in need of a ears drunk in the music of soft words confessor than a physician, for he was which fell from the lips of the inhabitant convinced her mind was

more disof heaven. But now she found that tempered than her body. But it was in the eye of Normas was not so bright as vain that the doctor was dull, and avoided Solrembah's, and once wished, if her his patient-he was at last informed, by nature was pure enough, 'that she might the lady's maid, that he alone must be accompany the angel to heaven. Wrong that confessor. Hereupon he gave his her not, --yes, she longed for Normas attendance to hear what she had to say, to journey with her to the starry abodes, which made a discovery that struck him and never more to tread the dædal earth with amazement. How to answer her if he was like Solrembah,

directly he knew not, for she had made Was not her love holy and disinte. a sort of ambiguous confession, which had rested? How could she do otherwise only pointed out her great respect for a than adore the superior beauty of the certain person without any name; he guardian angel? And was it not natu- thereupon told her, that her case was ral that she should wish for her Normas somewhat difficult, but he did not doubt to have the same heavenly endowments ? to ease her of all her anxieties, on that “ Young and beautiful he is,” she would account, in a month's time. Accordingly, say when alone, “fairer than any of the the young lady formed an inconceivable sons of Adam; but oh! his face is not joy to herself, but the doctor immediately so godlike as the angel's, and he has no laid the whole affair before the lord of wings to screen the sunbeams from me, her father, with a caution to him like Solrembah; still, still I love him not to let the daughter know he was any. above all earthly beings, and would wor- wise apprised of it, since it was in his ship him were he an angel.'

power to prevent her flinging herself Thus progressed Adoliah's love, away with a man beneath her, by a speedy thus grows the admiration we entertain contract of marriage with some person of for women of beauty and intellect: we equal extraction; this advice was readily follow the train of refined feelings, adore embraced and gratefully acknowledged, them as beings of a superior order, and and the lady, who is now living and one glide along upon the smooth ice of Pla- of the best of wives, was married within tonic sentiment, or like eagles we flap the time limited, to a nobleman who had our pinions in the very heart of the made pretensions to her for several thunder-cloud; but when we have ad- months before this discovery, which, at mired the glowing lightning, and again once, absolved the doctor of his promise, rested upon the common earth, do we and showed his inviolable attachment to find our wings unscathed ? Alas! no; the reputation and interest of his friend though eagles, we not cased in and benefactor. steel. Pure and unsullied may be our love for Normas, beyond that of any other earthly being ; but oh! his words The relative positions of the bachelor and are not so musical, neither are his eyes married man are happily contrasted in so bright, nor has he silver wings, like the following extract : Solrembah.

“ Johnson's maxim, 'that if wedlock has many troubles, celibacy has no enjoy

ments, is unquestionable, if the celibacy Doctor Radcliffe, the famous physician be old celibacy. For it is the time that in Queen Anne's time, was eccentric, settles the argument. The paradise of but kind-hearted, and many anecdotes of bachelorship is youth, when life is enjoyhis singular temper are told. From his ment in itself; the purgatory is old age, Life, we extract the following, which does when every thing instinctively grows him honour.

tasteless. It is when man is the wearied “ Doctor Radcliffe was a favourite of traveller, the satur conviva, the struggler the female sex. Among others, he with the natural infirmities of years, that attracted the notice of a lady of quality, the superiority of marriage is felt in those whose individuality is now lost under the simple supports and consolations, which name of Lady Betty. She contrived to make us forget our decline : those deep be out of order week after week, and, at and faithful attachments, which have exlast, fairly exhausted the patience of the changed the ardour of passion, only for doctor at being sent for on so many the fidelity of a bond of nature. The

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THE BLESSINGS OF WEDLOCK.

DIFFICULT CASE.

old man is then no outcast, miserable, if scudding under double-reefed topsails, he does not Autter in younger society, they would on land, and in a room, go and ridiculous, if he does; no friendless off like a discharge of musketry. But, and objectless hanger-on upon life, he has worse than all, is the minuteness of friends and occupation in his children ; detail; the distressing particularity which in their variety of mind, acquirement, ever pervades them. They are mere pursuit, success, he has a living study of paraphrases of the log-book; and the the heart, a revival of gentle thoughts due course and reckoning of the ship is and consecrated memories, cheered and most especially insisted onanimated by the still higher consciousness “That time bound straight for Portugal, that he has given pleasure to his country, Right fore and aft we bore ; that he has bequeathed the noble gift of

But when we made Cape Ortngal, life and mind, to those who will honour Yet, after all, there are some noble

A gale blew off the shore,” &c. his memory, when he is gone; that he things in this branch of the “ service," has added to the virtuous, the intelligent, amply sufficient to redeem it from disand the lovely, among mankind. It is

like. Who is there that has not held his surely worth more than the chance of breath when he has heard a rich deepsome anxieties, to be able to say, when

toned voice, commence Gay's glorious the world is closing on us, that we have

ballad not lived altogether in vain,”

“ All in the Downs the fleet lay moor'd;

The streamers waving in the wind !”
NAVAL SONGS.

and listened throughout with a quick

ened pulse, to that "plain unvarnished [In an article at page 240, are omitted tale” of humble love and tenderness.

some remarks on Naval Songs, which There is much, too, to please any man, are here subjoined :]

who is not over and above fastidious, in

dozens of Dibdin's vigorous and hearty The sea, “the battle and the breeze," sketches of a sailor's hardships and enjoyand the rapid and manifold vicissitudes ments; to say nothing of Pearce and incident to the life of a sailor, furnish a

others of inferior note; but from your bold and beautiful variety of subjects regular forecastle narratives, Apollo decapable of being turned to good account liver us! in a song or ballad. Yet, somehow or Things called “comic songs,” to wit, other, Apollo does not much affect the

« Four-and-twenty tailors all in a row, quarter-deck. The ocean brine is too &c., are, in my mind, striking exemplifipowerful for the waters of Castaly. cations of the depth of debasement of Poesy in some sort suffers by a “sea- which the human intellect is susceptible. change;" and the quantity to be extracted from a volume of genuine naval In' whatever way America is, or may ditties is wofully disproportionate to the become renowned, she will probably never bulk of ryhme. Some of the best sea be a land of song; and for two or three songs have been written by landsmen,

There are already a sufficiency and one great cause of their being so, of standard songs in the world to answer is their comparative freedom from per- all purposes ; and she has imported an plexing technicalities; for though a cha- ample sufficiency to supply the varied racteristic phrase may occasionally im- tastes and caprices of her musical popupart life and spirit to a production, yet lation. Moore's Melodies are as coma technicality, whether in marine or

mon in the cities of the west as in their agricultural poetry, is a sore stumbling- native land; and those of Burns are no block to the uninitiated. Now every rarity. The geography of the country, Jine (or plank) of three-fourths of your too, is strikingly unfavourable for indi- nautical melodies is calked with them, genous song. Nature has created the independently of containing a much land in one of her most liberal and maglarger infusion of tar than tenderness

nificent moods, and formed its features of pitch than pathos. They abound, on a scale of grandeur that is impossible likewise, in an inordinate degree, in

to grasp in this kind of writing. The descriptions of tornadoes, and discharges ocean-lakes the mighty rivers-the inof artillery-in slaughter and sudden terminable forests--the boundless praideath ; and the sentiments correspond ries, are all epic rather than lyrical. thereunto, being as rough as a hawser, How would it sound, either for rhyme and as boisterous as a north-wester.

or reason, Though admirably adapted to be growled

« On the shores of Mississippi, out by the boatswain when the vessel is

When the swect spring-time did fall!"

reasons.

The idea suggested is too vast. There confessor to Sir Oswald Raby,) who, is no snug endearing locality about such repeating the intelligence he had already scenes; and as for “ the sweet spring imparted to her lover, with some necestime," it never “ falls"

on a great pro- sary alterations, appointed the ruined, portion of the shores of rivers whose Saxon chapel, which stood on the verge waters rise far towards the regions of of her father's domain, as the trystingeternal winter, and roll through every place on the following night, when, he variety of climate, to those of everlast- declared, he would himself unite the ing summer; while the smaller streams, lovers, put them in safe possession of the which correspond in size to the “ Nith,” treasure, and enable them to fly to some the “ Dee," or “ Bonnie Doon,” are place of security till the outwitted paruined by the general appellation of rents should be reconciled. “ crik” (creek), which is bestowed upon The Lady Bertha was found about them; and to which some such eupho- three nights after these occurrences, stark nious title as Big Elk, Buffalo, or Otter, dead and cold in the dismantled yaults of is usually prefixed. Besides, America the old Saxon chapel; and stretched by is not rich in recollections of the past. her side, Sir Edmund, with his raiment No castles, grim, hoary and dilapidated, torn, his body frightfully lacerated, and frown upon her heights; no gorgeous his mind lost in melancholy frenzy ; abbeys moulder in her verdant vales. never opening his lips till the hour of his The joys, and sorrows, and sufferings of death, which rapidly ensued, when he told humanity are, as yet, scarcely impressed the strange tale, as far as I have now reupon her soil.

She has no records of lated it, but expired (ere he could exfeudal strife, of faded greatness, and plain its dreadful catastrophe) in strong fond affection--of all tradition loves, and convulsions, occasioned probably by the song delights in. Hope must, in some hideous remembrances that the tale degree, be to her poets, what memory is brought to his mind. to those of older lands. But the mind of As for the poor Carmelite, whom (it the song-writer is reminiscent-not anti- is needless to say), the Demon of the cipative ; and therefore it is, that with Gory Cowl had personated for diabolical whatever species of fame and greatness ends, nothing would have saved him from America may enrich her brows, it is tar-barrel and stake, but the universally probable she will never, in one sense, be appreciated excellence of his character, as worth an old song."

which had weight sufficient to show satisfactorily, even to Lord Ferrers himself, the monstrous improbability, that so holy

and peaceable a character as Father CleFRIAR WITH THE GORY COWL. ment, could have been an agent in a

transaction so horrible. As for the trea(CONCLUDED).

sure, of which not a stiver was forth

coming, it was heartily surrendered to The secret of this splendid discovery him of the Bloody Hood, and himself was in his breast alone; but having, as he consigned with many a malediction to said, no wish nor indeed use for such that penal place of abode which, from his baubles, he promised on the following frequent wanderings, he seemed to love day to guide the young knight to the so little. old chapel, and to make him master of As Sir Arthur Basset concluded his its inestimable deposit; without making story, a murmur arose at that part of the any stipulation to the advantage of him- fireside circle, where the strange friar self or his order.

had taken his seat; and, mingled exclaThis marvellous and even suspicious mations of surprise and expressions of omission was not regarded for an instant alarm, gradually spread through that by the delighted Sir Edmund, who motley cortege of Christmas revellers. agreed to be at the ruined chapel soon It was not long ere they became sensible after curfew on the ensuing night. to a man, of the startling fact that the

Meanwhile the wretched Bertha, who Dominican was no longer in the hall. since the celebration of her fiancels had How or when he had taken his silent de. been strictly guarded from all intercourse párture, no one could tell ; but if they with Sir Edmund Ferrers, had aban- might believe the evidence of their doned herself to despair ; when one day, senses, gone he undoubtedly was,--and she was raised to the summit of wonder. there was the tall wooden chair he had ing rapture and trembling hope, by the occupied, now vacant and staring them Carmelite of the castle, (who was also full in the face, in all the elaborate dig

WILLIAM COX.

THE

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