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nity of its shrinelike back, and carve-, and even the preparations for the bridal work of fruits and flowers, angels and suspended. shields, on which the fire flung a full and In time, however, the marvellous tale ruddy glow.

died away; and, so much does even the Before the astonishment occasioned by most astounding event lose its power, this mysterious and abrupt (not to say when for a time familiarized to the uncourteous) departure of the Domini mind, that the Baron de Mainefort and can from the hospitable hall of Golden. his friends, ere long, learnt to persuade rood, had time to subside,' a sudden themselves that the whole transaction darkness enveloped the lordly chamber, was the work of some mere mortal, who, and what resembled a monstrous. scarlet by way of a Christmas gambol, and by cowl, fit only for the scalp of a colossus, the aid of mask and cloak, an old gong, was seen, by the obscured light, descend- chemical preparations, and so forth, had ing slowly upon the fire in the centre of played upon their credulity, by this sucthe hall ; for an instant the festive flame cessful piece of mummery: cowered beneath this strange extinguish: At any rate, the bridal, thus terribly er, but immediately recovering, shot up- interrupted, was announced to take wards, and on every side, such broad place at the high festival of Pentecost; bickering and forked flames, as quickly and it was with green trees waving over scattered to a distance the courtly ring their heads, and gay flowers strewing which had so lately encircled its pleasant their path, that Sir Ildebrand Blondel hearth.

and the Lady Leonora, quitted the Fiercely recoiled the necromantic blaze, venerable church porch of Goldenrood, now climbing the solid wainscot, now when the village parson, a man of exwaving up and down the heavy tapestry, emplary piety and great learning, united rolling in red billows along the hall in holy wedlock their long affianced pavement, and curling like palm branches hands. of living gold, over the massy beams and The Goldenrood traditions say, that sculptured architraves of the mighty roof, it was solely owing to the wise precaubut neither consuming nor even impair. tions of this good man, (who not only ing any thing it touched.

sprinkled the

bridal bed with abundance The panic which ensued, it were vain of holy water, but also took care to have to attempt describing!--the scared guests a large red cross emblazed upon the door betook themselves to flight; but before of the bride-chamber,) that all further they could achieve their escape from the molestation was prevented from Friar various outlets of the hall, a thunderlike Redcowl. explosion of laughter burst from the high Certain it is, that many of the do lovery; and looking up they beheld, mestics were known to affirm, that, on dilated to prodigious dimensions, the ex- the night of their nuptial, strange noises aggerated features, white hair, flowing were heard in the great gallery of beard, and glittering eye, of the strange Goldenrood, at whose eastern extremity Dominican. “ Ha! ha! ha!" he ex- the bride-chamber stood; such as groans claimed, “ thanks mine bost, and you, and imprecations, accompanied by im. his garrulous guests, thanks ! you have patient stamping, as of baffled rage; reported me well ! but I will tell you nay, some went so far as to protest, that my best story myself!"

a gigantic spectre, with eyes glaring, The apparition vanished ; and imme- like stormy moons, from beneath a great diately a hideous tempest arose and raged Red Cowl was to be seen, for many a with preternatural violence : windows night, keeping watch at the folding clattered, doors banged, tiles flew off; doors. and what seemed a shower of mingled But, whether it was owing to the ashes and gore, sputtered through the sagacious manoeuvres of the parson of lovery, finally extinguishing the fire; Goldenrood, or whether this his first while the terrified company Aled aghast defeat in mischief utterly disheartened to their chambers in every direction. the fiend (as the tiger is said to retreat

Wild and dread were the accounts of abashed, if baffled in his spring,) the this horrible interruption to the Christ. Castle chronicles, while they relate the mas festivities of Goldenrood Castle, pomps and pageants of many successive which flew round the neighbourhood; Christmas festivals at Goldenrood, are full long did it furnish the gossips theme uniformly silent as to any further visitato that and the adjacent counties. tion from THE

And at the Castle itself, all the merry-making was at once broken off, Glasgow, November, 1836. H. G.

FRIAR WITH THE GORY

COWL.

LONDON: Published by Efingham Wilson, Junior, 16, King William Street, London Bridge.

Where communications for the Editor (post-paid) will be received.

(Printed by Manning and Smithson, Ivy-lane,]

OP FICTION, POETRY, HISTORY, AND GENERAL LITERATURE. No. 128. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1836.

Price Two-pence

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A DUEL IN THE

of France, is adhered to in England; SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. although, from the known generous dis

position of the people, without such (The following accounts from the witnesses being present, the maliciously French of Monsieur Coustard de Massi, taking any base advantages, from any of a duel in the early part of the seven- accident whatsoever, is seldom to be teenth century, is particularly interesta feared; as can be proved from numerous ing, and exhibits, in a singular light, the and undoubted instances among even the qualities of the combatants. We ques- lower part of the nation, where we see tion if the annals of duelling afford a fellows, when stript to fight, before and more remarkable instance of ferocity, after the engagement, shake hands with courage, and magnanimity, combined.

a kind of savage gallantry, for which, The particulars of the deadly struggle at times, as Pierre says in Venice Preare given by the survivor, with a minuter served, ness and perspicuity that forbid us to doubt his veracity; while his own coy

I could have hugg'd the greasy rogues, they

pleas'd me rage, and that of his unfortunate rival is rendered conspicuous. ]

and they detest nothing so much as the

least imputation of foul play, or the HAVING thus far treated of duels in having taken a mean advantage. France, it might be deemed a great Examples of this kind of athletic blemish, not to say an unpardonable bruising are to be seen every day, by omission in this performance, were the those who are curious enough to seek after writer to remain totally silent concern- such scenes, which may with the strictest ing that homicide practice in England. propriety be called duels with the fists.

The custom of fighting with seconds, - But, as instances of the mode of fighting to prevent any of the unfair dealing practised in higher life, with the auxiwhich is to be suspected in the rencontres liary implements of sword and pistol, are

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A MONSIEUR SACKVILLE.

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on one hand not to be seen so often, and with a worthy, gentleman, my second, on the other, few persons, especially in degree a knight; and for your comihose endowed with the tender sensa. ing I will not limit you a-peremptory tions of hymanity, would choose to be day; but desire you to make a definite spectators of so terrifying an experiment, and speedy repair, for your own hoi:our, here, softened from all the horrors of and fear of prevention, until which time real inspection, through the medium of you shall find me there. a faithful narrative, shall be presented

EDW. SACKVILLE.” to our readers as determined a duel as

Tergoso, Aug, 10, 1613. ever was fought; and this specimen will

4. suffice to convey a proper idea of British valour, when called upon à toute outrance, as in that celebrated single com

“I have received your letter by your bat between a gentleman of the illus- man, and acknowledge you have dealt trious Sackville family, and a Scotch nobly with me; and now I come with peer, Lord Bruce. Their letters pre

all possible haste to meet you. vious to the fight will convey an ade

EDW. BRUCE." quate idea of the spirit of such anta- The public is indebted for a relation gonists,

of the duel between Lord Bruce and Sir 1.

Edward Sackville, to a letter written by

the latter to one of his friends in England. 1, that am in France, hear how • Worthy Sir, much you attribute to yourself this time

“As I am not ignorant, so Lhat I have given the world leave to ring ought I to be sensible of the false asper. your praises

If you call to

sions some authorless tongues have laid memory where I gave you my hand upon me, in the report fof the unforlast, I told you I reserved the heart for tunate passage which lately. happened a truer reconciliation. Now be that between the Lord Bruce and myself, noble gentleman my love once spoke which as they are spread here, so I may you, and come and do hiin right that justly fear they reign also where you would recite the trials you owe your birth

There are but two ways to resolve and country, were I not confident your doubts of this nature; by oath, or by honour gives you the same courage to

sword. The first is due to magistrates, do me right, that it did to do me

and communicable to friends; the other wrong.

to such as maliciously slander, and Be master of your weapons and impudently defend their assertion. time; the place wheresocver, I will * Your lovę, not my mérits, assure wait upon you. By doing this you me, you hold me your friend, which shall shorten revenge, and clear the idle esteem I am much desirous to retain ; opinion the world hath of both our do me therefore, the right to understand worths.

EDW. BRUCE.'

the truth of that; and, in my behalf, 2.

inform others, who either are or may be

infected with sinister 'rumours, much A MONSIEUR LE BARON DE KINLOSS. .. As it shall always be far from me

prejudicial to that fair opinion I desire

io hold amongst all worthy persons : to seek a quarrel, so will I always be and on the faith of a gentleman, the ready to meet with any that desire to relation I sttall give is neither more 'nor make trial of my valour by so, fair a less than the bare truth. course as you require ; a witness whereof

“ The enclosed (alluding to the above yourself shall be, who, within a month, lotters) contains the first citation sent shall receive a strict account of time, me fróin Paris, by a Scoich gentleman, place, and weapon, where you shall find who delivered it me in Derbyshire, at me ready disposed to give you honour- my father in-law's house. After it fol. able satisfaction, by him that shall con- lows my then answer, returned to him duct you thither. In the mean time, by the same bearer. The next is my be as secret of the appointment as it accomplishment of my first promise, seems you are desirous of it.

being a particular assignation of place

and weapons, whien 'I sent by a servant (3.

of mine, by post, from Rotterdam, as

soon as he landed there. “I am ready at Tergoso, a town in “The receipt of which, joined to an Zealand, to give you the satisfaction acknowledgment of my too fair carriage your ssvord can render you, accompanied to the deceased lord, testified by the last,

66

* EDW. SACKVILLE.

A MONSIEUR LE RARON DE KINLOSS.

66

1

which periods the business until we Hereupon Sir John Heldon replicd, met at Tergoso, in Zealand, it being that such intentions were bloody and the place allotted for rendezvous; where butcherly, far unfitting so noble a per: he, accompanied with one Mr. Crawford, sonage, who should desire to bleed for an English gentleman, for his second, reputation, not for life; withal adding, a surgeon, and a man, arrived with all he thought himself injured, being come the speed he could.

thus far, to be now prohibited from “And there having rendered himself, executing those honourable offices he I addressed my second, Sir John came fors-The lord for answer only Heidon. to let him understand, that reiterated his former resolutions; where all following should be done by consent; upon Sir John leaving him the sword he as concerning the terms whereon we had elected, delivered me the other with should fight, as also the place. To our his determinations. seconds we gave power for their appoint- “ The which, not for matter, but ments; who agreed we should go to manner so moved me, as though, to my Antwerp, from thence to Bergen-op- remembrance, I had not for a long time zoom, where in the midway bet a vil- eaten more liberally than at dinner, and lage divides the States territories from therefore unfit for such an action, (seeing the Arch-duke's.

the surgeons hold a wound upon a full “And there was the destined stage, to stomach much more dangerous than the end that having finished the affair, otherwise), I requested my second to he that, could justice of the country,' the difference, and therefore he should

might presently exempt certify to him I would presently decide

from by retiring into the dominion whose presently meet me on horseback, only laws were not offended. It was likewise waited on by our surgeons, they being concluded, that in case any should fall unarmed. or slip, that then the combat should Together we rode, but one before cease, and he whose ill fortune had so the other, about two English miles; and suhjected him, was to acknowledge his then passion, having so weak an enemy to life to have been in the other's hands. assail as my discretion, easily became vic« But in case

one party's sword tor, and, using his power, made me obeshould break, because that could only dient to his commands. I being verily chance by hazard, it was agreed that mad with anger that Lord Bruce should the other should take no advantage, but thirst after my life with a kind of aseither then be made friends, or also, suredness; seeing I came so far, and upon even terms go to it again. Thys needlessly, to give him leave to regain these conclusions, being each of them his lost reputation. related to his party, were by us both “I bade him alight, which with all approved and, assented to.

willingness he quickly granted; and Accordingly we embarked for Ant- there, in a meadow, ancle deep in water werp, and by reason, my lord, (as I at the least, bidding fatewell to our conceive, because he could not hand- doublets, in our shirts began to charge somely, without danger or discoven) each other ; having before commanded had not paired the sword, I sent him to our surgeons to withdraw themselves at Paris, bringing one of the same length, a pretty distance from us; conjuring but twice as broad; my second excepted them besides, as they respected our against it, and advised me to match my favours, or their own safeties, not to own, and send him the choice; which Í stir, but suffer us to execute our pleasure, obeyed, it being, you know, the chal- we being fully resolved, (God forgive lenger's privilege to elect his weapon. us!) to dispatch each other by what

“ At the delivery of the sword, which means we could. was performed by Sir Jolin Heidon, it “ I made a thrust at my enemy, but pleased the Lord Bruce to choose my was short; aud in drawing back my own; and then, past expectation, he arm I received a great wound therein, told him, that he found himself so far which I interpreted as a reward for my behind-hand, as a little of my blood short shooting; buty in revenge, I prest would not serve his turn; and therefore into him, though I then missed him he was now resolved to have me alone, also, and then received a wound in my because he knew, (for I will use his own right pap, which passed both through words,) that so worthy a gentleman and my body, and almost to my back; and my friend could not stand by and see there we wrestled for the two greatest and him do that which he must to satisfy dearest prizes we could ever expeot trial himself and bis honour.

honour and life; in which struggling,

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my hand having but an ordinary glove dreamt of it, came full at me with his on it, lost one of her servants, though Lordship's sword; and, had not mine the meanest; which having hung by a with my sword interposed, I had been : skin, and, to sight, yet remaineth as slain by those base hands ; although my before, and I am in hope one day to Lord Bruce, weltering in his blood and recover the use of it again.

: past all expectation of life, conformable “At last, breathless, yet keeping our to his former carriage, which was funholds, their past, on both sides, pro- doubtedly noble, cried out, Crascal, hold positions of quitting each other's swords. thy hand.' But, when amity was dead, confidence

I

prosper, as I have dealt could not live; and who should quit first sincerely with you in the relation, which was the question, which on neither part I pray you, with this letter, to deliver to either would perform; and wrestling my Lord Chamberlain. again afresh, with a kick and a wrench “ Louvain, September 8j 1618." together, I freed my long captivated weapon: which instantly levelling at his ON A TUFT OF DAISIES, throat, being master still of his, I de

AT THE THRESHOLD OF AN OLD MANSION;
manded if he would ask his life, or
yield his sword ? both which, though in (Now only occasionally used as an adjuncte to

the neighbouring inn.)
that imminent danger, he bravely denied
to do..

Ah! thou hast chosen well thy time to “Myself being wounded, and feeling

plant thy petals here, loss of blood, having three conduits Pale porter of this Ancient House so tunning on me, which began to make

desolate and drear! me faint, and he courageously persisting For when, on each high festival, with not to accord to either of my proposi- horsehoofs' prancing din, tions; through remembrance of his The Baron's guests, in rich attire, came former bloody desire, and feeling of my clamorously in, present estate, I struck at his heart, but, What careless eye had deigned a glance, with his avoiding, missed my aim, yet

upon thy pleading face ? passed through the body, and drawing 'Twere much in sooth if thou badst out my sword, repassed it again through 'scaped the grinding heeľs disgrace. another place, when he cried, Oh! I But now,-0, feeble sentinel of this am slain !' seconding his speech with dishonoured hall! all the force he had to cast me; but Fond vással vainly lingʻring on the he being too weak, after I had defended

threshold's mossy pall ! his assault, I easily became master of Mid lichens' dead emblazed as bright him, laying him upon his back; when,

as on the verdant Lee, being upon him, I re-demanded 'if he bless the door that shuts me out, since would request his life; but it seemed

it hath harboured thee. he prized it not at so dear a rate to be beholden for it, bravely replying: 'he Thou would'st not that a stranger's tread, scorned it;' which answer of his was so (the hostel's passing guest), noble and worthy, as I protest I could Should violate the vestibule, that friendnot find it in my heart to offer him any ship often blest ; more violence, only keeping him down, The mansion's social spirit thou, sprung until at length his surgeon afar off from the countless feet cried out, he would immediately die, Which alms or hospitality, did here unif his wounds were not stopped :' where. grudging, greet ! upon I asked, if he desired his surgeon Alas! more like in loveliness (so bright should come; which he accepted of;

yet so forlorn), and so being drawn away, I never The marble effigy that doth some sepuloffered to take 'his sword, counting it chre adorn; inhuman to rob a dead man ; for so I Surviving, in its cold repose, the memory held him to be.

of the dead, “ The matter being thus ended, I At most but a remembrancer that all we retired to my surgeon, in whose arms, loved is filed, for want of blood, I lost my sight; and Well! spread thy leaves ! blockade the withal, as I then thought, lost my life

porch !--to sordid Gain 'tis sold; also; but strong water, and his dili. To love 'twill never open more ;-its gence, quickly recovered me, when I

only key is gold. escaped from a very great danger.

HORACE GUILFORD. "Lord Bruce's surgeon, when nobody Loch Lomond, September 7th.

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