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TO A CHILD.

Alone, in unuttered sympathy, the

two ascended the steps of the sacred (For the Parterre.)

temple and approached the shrine. A

priest stood behind the altar. The blue Yes, I do love thee well, my child! smoke of the incense curled upward in

Albeit, mine's a wandering mind, front, and the book of oracles was before
But never, darling, hast thou smild, him. “ Where shall my grave be digged?"

Or spake a word that did not find said the king; and the priest opened the
A ready echo in my heart :

book and read, “Where the soil is of What hours I've held thee on my knee, iron and the sky of gold, there shall the Thy little rosy lips apart,

grave of the monarch of men be digged." And when asleep, I've gazed (on thee, Or humm'd old tunes, that oft bring rest,

To the utmost limit, Asia had become And hugg'd thee closely to my bosom, the possession of the Macedonian. And blesss'd thee--from my heart I've Fatigued with conquest, and anxious to blest,

seek a country where the difficulty of My hope, my care, my blue-eyed victory should enhance its value, the blossom!

hero was returning to Europe. A few maileapo

T. MIDLER. days would have brought him to the

capital of his kingdom, when he felt THE DEATH OF SIKANDER. himself suddenly ill. He was lifted A ROMANCE OF HISTORY.

from his horse, and one of his generals

unlacing his armour, spread it out for Tur bannered hosts of Macedon stood him to lie upon, and held up his golden arrayed in splendid might. Crowning shield to screen him from the mid-day the hills, and" Alling the valleys, far and sun, When the king raised his eyes and wide extended the millions in arms, who beheld the glittering canopy, he was conwaited on the word of the young Sikan- scious of the omen. « The oracle has der;* the most superb array of human said, that where the ground should be of power which sceptred ambition had ever iron and the sky of gold, there should evoked to do its bidding. That army my grave be made! Behold the fulwas to sweep nations off the earth, and filment! It is a mournful thing! The make a continent its camp, following the young cypress is cut down in the vigour voice of one whose sword was the index of its strength, in the first fulness of its of glory, whose command was the syno- beauty. The thread of life is snapped nyme of triumph. It now stood ex- suddenly, and with it a thousand prospects pectant, for the king yet lingered. vanish, a thousand hopes are crushed !

While his war-horse fretted at the But let the will of fate be done! She gate, and myriads thus in silence awaited has long obeyed my behest! I yield his appearance, Sikander took his way myself now to bers!' Yet my mother!" to the apartment of his mother. The And the monarch mused in melancholy sole ligament which bound him to virtue silence, At length he turned to his and to feeling, was the love, of that attendants, and ordered his tablets to be mother; and the tie was as strong as it brought, and he took them and wrote: was tender. In mute dejection they “ Let the customary alıns which my embraced ;

and Sikander, as he gazed mother shall distribute at my death, be upon that tender face, which had never given to those who have never felt the been turned to him but in tenderness miseries of the world, and have never and yearning love, seemed to ask, “ Shall lost those who were dear to them;" and I ever again behold that sweet sinile ?" sinking back upon his iron couch, le The anxiety of his mother's countenance yielded up his breath. They buried denoted the same sad curiosity, and with him where he died, and an army wept out a word, but with the self-same feel over his grave! ing in their breasts, they went out together to seek the oracles in the temple When the intelligence of the death of of Philip, and to learn their fate. Sikander was brought to his mother, as

she sat among her ladies, she was overwhelmed by anguish.

“Ah! why," • This narration is given by the Persian historians, as the manner of Alexander's death. she exclaimed, was I exalted so high, It differs entirely from the Greek accounts. only to be plunged into such depth of The hero is called variously by Asiatic writers, misery? Why was I not made of lowlier present him to have been thirty-six years old condition, so haply I had escaped such when he died; the same age as Lord Byron. grief? The joy of my youth is plucked

the poor.

rose;

to sip,

up, the comfort of my age is withered! not have escaped the blow. There are Who is more wretched than I ?” and she nights without a star, but there are no refused to be comforted.

days without a cloud. To suffer, is the The last wish of her son was read to lot of all! to bear, the glory of a few!" her, and she resolved to perform that “I recognize,” said the queen, “the one remaining duty, and then retire to wisdom of Sikander !" and she bowed in solitude to indulge her grief for the resignation, and wept no more. remainder of her life. She ordered her servants to go into the city and bring to the palace such as the will of Sikander

THE DEAD BEE. directed, selecting those who were the poorest. But the messengers ere long

(For the Parterre.) returned, and said that there were none of that description to be found among , cruel Mary, thou hast kill'd a bee, “ Go, then," said the queen,

That but mistook thy soft lips for a "and apply to all classes, and return not without bringing some who have never Lured by that sweetness which hath oft lost any who were dear to them.” And

drawníme the order was proclaimed through all the

Upon their velvet softness to repose. city, and all heard it and passed on.

Like falling dew The neighbouring villages gave no better

On violets blue, success; and the search was extended

As silvery-footed rain descends, through all the country, and they went

When the breathing woodbine bends, overall Macedonia, and throughout It sought some lovely flower, and fir'd Greece, and at every house they stood

on thee, and cried, “If there are any here who

And at the fountain's sweetness 'gan have never known misery, and never jost those that were dear to them, let It left no'sting behind; but happily them come out and receive the bounty of the queen;" but none came forth. Nay, weep not now, it died a happy bee!

Gave up its little life on thy sweet lip. And they went to the haunts of the

gay, and into the libraries of the philosophers;

T. MILLER. to the seats of the public office, and to the caves of hermits; they searched SCENES OF PRIVATE LIFE, among the rich and among the poor, among the high and among the low, but not one person was found who had not tasted misery; and they reported the result to the queen.

Usurer :- Can you realize this image ? “ It is strange!" said she, as if struck he is pale and sickly; and his face, if I with sudden astonishment. Are there might be permitted the expression, sis none who liave not lost their friends.? thin and watery like that of the man in and is my condition the condition of all? the moon; its colour is like gilded It is not crediblc. Are there none here silver, whose polish has been dulled; in this room, in this palace, who have his hair is smooth, carefully combed, not always been happy? But there was and of a cinder colour; his features are no reply to the inquiry. “ You, young passionless, like those of M. de Talleypage, whose countenance is gay, what rand, as if they were moulded in bronze; sorrow have you ever known ?"

his eye, as yellow as a' baboon's, is nearly Alas! madam, my father was killed destitute of lashes ; his lips and chin are in the wars of Sikander, and my mother, sharp and thin; his diminutive eyes are through grief, has followed him !" always protected from the light by the

And the question was put to others, green front-piece of an old cap; he is but all had lost a brother, a father, or a always dressed in rusty black; his age mother.

is a problem; it is doubtful whether he “ Can it be?” said the queen in peris old before his time, or whether he plexity. “ Can it be that all are as I economised his youth in order to make

it last longer. ." All are as you are, madani," said an His life glides on as noiselessly as the old inan who was present, " excepting in sand of an old hour-glass; his actions, these splendours and these consolations from his hour of rising in the morning By poverty and humility, you might to his periodical fits of coughing in the have lost the alleviations, but you could evening, are all as regular as the pen

ADAPTED FROM DE BALZAC.

е By Josep

1.THE USURER.

am?":

he.

dulum of a clock. Like the insect which poets who print thesr verses ? demanded inhabits the crevices of decayed wood, and which, when louched, rolls itself up Poetry in that soul?" I asked of and pretends to be dead, this man, myself internally. should a carriage pass by ivhile he is « There is no life so brilliant as mine," speaking, ceases his talk, in order not to continued he, and his eye sparkled. force his voice. Like Fontenelle, he is “Listen, and by the recital of this avaricious of the motions of vitality, and morning's events, you may for some concentrates every human feeling in I. idea of the nature of my pleasures."

His existence is a inystery. The only He rose, and pushed to the bolt of his person with whom he communicates door, drew before it a curtain of old confidentially is myself. It is to me he tapestry whoserings creaked discordantly applies for a light; he borrows my books upon the iron rod, and resumed his seat. and my newspapers, and in the evening “ This morning I had only two notes I am the only person he admits into his to collect, because I had paid over all closet, and to wlioin he talks unre- the others due, as ready money to my servedly. These marks of confidence customers. The first bill was presented have grown out of a neighbourhood of to me to be cashed by a very handsome seven years. I know not whether he young man, who came in a tilbury; it has relations or friends; I have never was signed by one of the most splendid seen any with him. His fortune is in women in Paris, the wife of a rich próthe vaults of the bank of France, and prietor; but how his signature was he collects his notes himself, because (as obtained I knew not, and it was no he once told me) he charges two francs business mine; it was for one thouover ‘and above the discount for every sand francs. The other bill for the walk he takes for their payment. same amount was also drawn by 'a

One evening I entered the room of female, and was signed • Fanny Milthis man, whose trade it is to make vaut.' It was brought to me for disgold. I found him in his arm-chair, count by a linen merchant. The Counmotionless as a statue, his eyes fixed tess resided in the Rue du Helder, and upon the mantel-piece, where he ap- Fanny in tbe suburb of Montmartre. peared to be reading the rates of dis- If you knew the romantic conjectures I count. A dilapidated lamp threw a lurid framed in going there this morning! glare upon his pale visage. He raised whạt a proud satisfaction I felt, in his eyes as I entered, but said nothing; thinking that if these women were not and I seated myself by his side, in the prepared with funds, they would be chair which was prepared for me.

forced to treat me with as much re“ Can this being think ?” said I to verence and respect as if I were their myself. '“Is he conscious of the ex- father .. What would not the istence of a God, of human passion, of Countess be compelled to submit to on woman, and of happiness! Good even- account of these one thousand francs ! ing, father Gobseck!"

She will have to assume an affectionate He turned his face to me, and his air, and to speak to me in those soft, dark, shaggy eyebrows were slightly sweet accents which she reserves, most contracted; this was the nearest ap. probably, for the indorser of the note ; proximation to a smile I ever observed she must exhaust each caressing phrase, on his features.

perhaps entreat me on her knees, while Why, sir, you are as melancholy as I

and here the old man gazed on that day when they came to announce upon me with a look of ice; “I," to you the failure of

the pub- resumed he, “will be inexorable, I will lisher! Have you met with any de- be there as an avenger, as a personififaulters to day? It is, if I mistake not, cation of commencing remorse-but, let the thirty-first

us quit these suppositions-I arrived This was the first occasion I had ever there. alluded to money matters.

He looked " The Countess has not yet risen," at me, and replied in his low tones, said her waiting-woman. “I was atnusing inyself by . .

" When will she be visible ?" “You do amuse yourself, then, somé

" At noon." times?"

“ Is your lady ill ?,' He shrugged up his shoulders, and “No, sir-but she did not return cast upon ine a glance of pity.

from the ball until three o'clock this “Do you think that they are the only morning."

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"My name is Gobseck; tell her 1 Flowers, diamonds, gloves, a bouquet, called, and that I will return at noon.' and a belt, lay scattered here and there,

" I then went to the suburb Mont- and a faint odour of perfume was just martre, and at the door of a humble perceptible. A rich fan, half unfolded, residenee, I asked for Mademoiselle. was on the chimney-piece, and the Fanny Milvaut.”

drawers of a bureau were half open. “ She has gone out,” the portress re- Everything shewed luxury and disorder, plied; "but if you came on account of beauty without liarmouy, wealth and the bill, I have the money ready for misery in strange alliance. The worn you.”

and weary features of the Countess were " I will return," I observed ; for at in keeping with her chamber, covered the instant the purtress told me the with the fragments of a fête. These money was there, I felt a curiosity to scattered gewgaws excited my compasknow the young girl, and I concluded sion ; for when collected together the at once that she was beautiful.

preceding evening, they must have “ I passed the morning in looking at caused a sort of delirium in the minds the engravings displayed for sale in the of those who gazed upon their wearer. Boulevards, and, as the clock struck They were like the relics of a love which twelve, I crossed the hall which led to remorse had crushed; the images of a the Countess' apartment.

life of dissipation, luxury, and bustle ; “ The Countess has only just rung her the efforts of Tantalus to snatch at pleabell, and I do not think she can be seen sures without substance. A scarcely yet,”

perceptible freckle or two upon her face, “I will wait,” I observed, and seated enhanced the exquisite delicacy of her myself in a gilded arm-chair.

skin; her features seemed as if they The window-curtains in the Countess' were a little swelled; and a dark circle bed-room were scarcely drawn, when the beneath her eyes was more strongly attendant appeared, and begged me to marked than ordinary. Nevertheless walk in.

her nature had sufficient energy to perThe manner in which she addressed vent these indications of dissipation beme led ine to anticipate that her mistressing prejudicial to the effect of her beauty, was not prepared for my visit. But Her eyes sparkled, and she resembled what an exquisite creature I beheld! one of the Herodiades in Leonardo da She had carelessly Aung a. Cashmere Vinci's painting (for I have been a picshawl over her shoulders, but had enve. ture broker in my time). She wa

was

in loped herself in it so gracefully that each the full vigour of life and strength ; no ravishing charm was perfectly defined! clumsiness of shape nor irregularity of She was dressed in a pretly morning feature interrupted the perfection of her gown, as white as the driven snow. The beauty. Although she inspired love, raven tresses escaped in confusion from still there was something about her which the Indian handkerchief which was capri- scemed to be superior to the passion. ciously wound round her head, after the I was pleased with her; and it was a Creole fashion. Her couch was in most long time since the pulses of my heart picturesque disorder, and it was evident had beat. I was paid in gazing upon that her sluinber had been a troubled her; for I would give more than a thou

A painier would have given much sand francs any day for one sensation for the opportunity of portraying such a which should bring vividly before me

Under hangings voluptuously the recollections of my youth. disposed, a pillow was flung upon a coun- “ Sir,” she said, pointing to a chair, terpane of blue silk, whose fringes of “ will you accommodate me by waiting lace made a vivid contrast to the delicate for a few days."

On a splendid tiger skins, pread “ Until 10-morrow at noon," I replied, at the mahogany feet of the bed, sculp- folding up the note I had presented to tured so as to represent lions' paws, glis- her. " I have no right to have it protened a pair of satin shoes, thrown off in tested till then." But I said within my the carelessness occasioned by the fatigue own bosom, " you shall pay for your of the ball. A rumpled dress hung luxury, your rank, your fortune, and the across a chair, and-its long sleeves swept monopoly of every thing you enjoy. For the floor. Stockings, which might have the wretch who robs for bread, there are floated on the lightest breeze, were tribunals, judges, and scaffolds; but for twisted round the arms of a chair, and those who sleep upon, and under silk, exquisite white garters were tied in a there is remorse and gnashing of teeth knot, and Aung upon ottoman. while your lips are softened into a smile,

one.

scene.

azure.

an

very heart.”

stances.

and claws of steal which pierce intoj

your “ here are two hundred francs, which I

will trouble you to return to the Coun« A protest! Surely you would never tess; and you will please to notify to think of such a thing?" she exclaimed, her, at the same time, that I shall hold looking at me steadily. “You could the pledge she has given me this mornnever have so little consideration for a ing for eight days, to await any future female !"

arrangement she may wish to make re« If the king owed me money, ma- specting it." dame, and did not pay; I should sue “ He took the two hundred francs, him."

and could not suppress a derisive smile, as “ At this instant a gentle tap at the much as to say, “ Ah! ah ! shie has paid door of the cliamber was heard.

you, then ! so much the better!" I read I am not at home," cried the young in his physiognomy the Countess's future lady, in an imperious tone.

fate. « But, Emily, I wish to speak to “f then bent my steps to the Montyou.”

martre suburb to Mademoiselle Fanny's, “ Not now, dear,” she replied, in a I mounted a very steep and narrow stair. gentler accent, but which was still with case, and when I reached the fifth story, out any tenderness.

I was introduced into a newly-furnished 4** You are jesting, Emily, for I know room, where everything was wonderfully that you have been talking to some one." neat and comfortable. There was not

“ And a gentleman, who could be no the slightest trace of dust upon the simother than the Count, suddenly made his ple furniture of the chamber where Maw appearance. The Countess gave me a demoiselle Panny received me.

She was hurried glance-I understood her, and a young Parisian girl, elegant and fresh, at that moment she was my slave. Ah! and prepossessing in appearance, with there was a time when I was silly enough chestnut hair, lustrously combed in two not to protest under similar circum- bows upon her temples, which formed a

beautiful contrast with her blue eyes, as “ What is your business, Sir," the clear as crystal. She was attired with Count inquired of me.

the utmost simplicity, and the light in. “ I saw the woman tremble.' The white tercepted by the curtains drawn across and satin texture of her "neek became the window, threw a soft shade upon her wrinkled, and contracted like what is lovely countenance. She was opening a commonly called a goose's skin. I piece of linen, and innumerable fraglaughed inwardly, but my muscles were inents around her sufficiently indicated unmoved.

her. habitual occupations. She seemed “ This person is one of my uphol- to me quite an ideal image of solitude, sterers," said she. The Count turned When I presented my note to her, I his back upon me, and I drew the note observed that I had not found her at half out of my pocket. When she per- home when I called in the morning. ceived my gesture, and that I was inex- " But,” she said, “ I left the money orable, the lady came close to me and with the portress.” I pretended not to handed me a diamond.

hear her, and rejoined, « Take that,” said she, “and begone!" “ It appears, Mademoiselle, that you

“We exchanged values- I bowed, and go out early every morning." withdrew. The diamond was well worth “I looked steadfastly at her, and at twelve hundred francs. As I went into one glance I understood the whole affair. the court-yard; I saw two sumptuous She was the child of a family formerly in equipages, and a crowd of lacqueys brush- affluent circumstances, but whom mising their liveries and polishing their fortune had driven to labour. There boots. These are the causes, I' said to was an indescribable. air of virtue, 'momyself, which bring people to me desty, and native nobility in every feature which make them rob their country of and gesture, and everything about her millions, or force them to betray it. To was in conformity with her manners. I prevent their splashing themselves on seemed to breathe an atmosphere of sina foot, they put up, at last, with a thorough cerity and candour.- -When you came wallowing in the mud. At this very in I was thinking that Fanny Milvaut instant, the great gate opened, and gave would make a delightful little wife, and admittance to the elegant tilbury of the for the next fortnight I shall delight young man who had brought the note myself with contrasting her pure and to me.

solitary existence with that of the Coun “Sir," said I, when he had alighted; téss, who has already one foot in vice !

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