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nificence, they only await the first rude within, whose extent the eye, unaccusgale to shake down that superb canopy to tomed to the glimmering gloom, is at the earth, and to wave their giant arms first unable to ascertain. If the sun above the withered leaves that now em- chance to be shooting his stinted light blaze them with all nature's heraldry. through the doorway, you are enabled

The eye aches with the manifold, but to descend to the bottom of the steps, mournful splendour, and gladly rests and looking upward may almost shudder upon that narrow opening of green turf, at the living grave to which you have a short space up the river bank, and in voluntarily committed 'yourself; to the the centre of the basking wood, on which height of nearly an hundred feet, two a slender gray building of considerable thirds of which sink below the surface height (whether hunting-tower, summer- of the earth, the water-tower soars-a hall, or banquet-lodge, you know not), stupendous cylinder, its strange walls discloses its quaint form from base to ghastfully streaked with wandering light, battlement. A glossy network of deli- that makes the gloom, (its prevailing cate ivy, irregularly spreads its minute feature,) horrible. The disgusting toad matting over a portion of the large ashler crawls in its bloated heaviness from the stones that form the bulky buttresses, sliding foot, and a colony of leatherand the pale hues of the remainder of winged bats, creaking hither and thither, the building are diversified by large make you almost wish the company of spreading rings of white and yellow the old brown owl, that giddy and lichens, and tufts of velvet moss;—the blinking sailed, or rather reeled out at starry landcress roots itself on every little your approach into the sunshine he projection, and the gilliflower waves its abhors, gray pods in wilding clusters, evidences A doorway with grooves as if for of the spicy yellow flowers that breathe sliding panels recommunicates at the and glow there in the spring; while, on its bottom of the interior stairs with a half disembattled brow, a stinting shrub gloomy souterrain, whose original exof wide-spreading yew, glooms over the tent is however left to the imagination rusty remains of what once was a wea- by the huge masses of disjointed mathercock. A broken flight of steep stone sonry with which either time or man's steps, without any banister, leads to a device have obstructed the passage. narrow door midway in the surface of the Tradition saysnevertheless, that forbuilding, adorned with a broken drip. merly this subterraneous gallery exstone, and defaced corbelles, and sur. tended under the bed of the Derwent to mounted by an armorial shield; but the moat at Darkelms; various accounts there is neither chimney nor window were handed down of the uses to which it (unless a huge circular orifice high up in was applied, but all agreed that by the aid its gloomiest side, deserves the name,) to of certain sluices and floodgates, it might be traced in this antic tower.

Two or

be filled with water, and was occasionally three antediluvian yew-trees partially used to supply the water-tower, into overshadow the narrow slope of turf on whose hollow womb its gloomy floods which it stands, and finely relieve by might be conveyed to such a height as their sedate grandeur, the variegated

almost to cover the topmost step. paintings of the wood, from which they emerge, and the vermilion clusters of “And now, my kind good Constantine several aged rowans straggling here and whom I love with all a sister's affection, there around the green platforin. and who hast ever proved a more than

In days of yore, when the Darrell father to poor Lilias Fortescue, dear family made Darkelms their favourite Constantine; I have now, at whatever residence, this isolated edifice formed a cost, told the fair and full truth; believe sort of conduit, or reservoir to the hall, that the pain it gives you to hear, is and was called The Water Tower, which doubly felt by me who speak it.” title it still retains in its dismantled state, “ Pain, Lily!-pain ! -oh heavens! is and, as well from the picturesque an

there no deadlier name to give my tiquity of its appearance, as from its heart's chaos at this its dreadful wakenmysterious and melancholy interior,forms ing from its dreams of bliss, this ex. no slight attraction to the rambling anti- pulsion from its fool's paradise? pain! quary, that prying inquisitor into old pain !" mansions and their paraphernalia.

“ Nay, dear cousin ! confess, at least, Having climbed the steps on the ex- that if I concealed my preference of terior to some height, the gaping door Valence Harcourt, to this day, when I way displays a corresponding staircase am become my own mistress, and at

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your express desire do most reluctantly beaming candour and goodness, and the reveal it, confess, in justice, that no love that lived in her large hazel eyes, foolish caprice, no vain coquetry-" only hidden by those long fringed lids

“ I do—I do confess it! fool that I which modesty makes his sanctuary. have been! a thousand circumstances Lilias Fortescue's supreme beauty de. recur, that, had I not been wilfully, fied even the abomination of the moninsanely blind, might have long ago strous vardingale of silk and uninerva satisfied me that you owed me no more that disguised her graceful form, and the than a ward's respect; telt for me no odious association of the yellow starched more than a kind sister's love. But, oh ruff of cobweb lawn which concealed her Lily! Lily! was there no other than ivory neck. our hereditary foe, could none but that Her companion, whom she had reyoung fiery Romanist, none but Valence peatedly addressed by the title of Sir ConHarcourt, be selected to shew me what stantine Darrell, might be some fifteen a self-deluded idiot I have been ?” or twenty years her senior;

the vigour Neither Valence Harcourt, nor any of matured manhood bad not bowever mortal man that knows Sir Constantine displaced the bloom of youth ; and if, at Darrell, can know aught, save what pro. this moment, his brow was clouded with claims time, as he is brave and benevo. bitter emotions, neither time nor intemlent, and wise and good. Nay, cousin ! perance had sowed a wrinkle there; and turn not away ! if I speak much now to a frame of masculine beauty was upon this unpleasing matter, it is only added that winning countenance, with. because I feel I can never again un- out which the best comported body is burthen myself on a subject I know you but as a valuable volume wanting its will never renew. In the late queen's illuminated frontispiece. reign, child as I was, I well remember His dark brown hair, thick and curl. my father enlarging in my presence on ing, was brushed back from his forehead the praises of Valence Harcourt, then a and temples; a wide cambric band, youth of seventeen, and chiefly because deeply bordered with rich lace, fell over he had resisted more than one invidious a long-waisted doublet of velvet that attempt to inveigle him as a partizan fitted very close to his body; and his to the popish conspiracies which so fre- buff silk hose, girded with stripes of quently threatened the throne of Eli- embroidered velvet, descended wide and zabeth. Valence was then an orphan, large to the middle of his thigh, from and residing in the old manor-house whence to the ancles they fitted so tight which his father's rashness had almost as to shew every nerve and vein of his rendered landless, gladly received the athletic limbs. advances of Lord Fortescue, (not even The interval of unutterable emotion inferior to your father Constantine in which succeeded Mistress Fortescue's his loyal adherence to his sovereign,) last speech, was employed by Sir Conand, notwithstanding his uncompromis- stantine in efforts, (not entirely without ing attachment to what my father be success,) to subdue his weaker part, and lieved not only a false but a treasonable do justice to his real nobility of characreligion, so won upon his regard that, at ter. He approached his cousin and took length, he almost lived in our family. her handWhen I became an orphan, Constantine, Forgive me, Lilias !” he said, I my affections were no longer my own; have been unreasonable, nay, unjust; and the seven years that have smiled and to have appeared so, in your eyes upon me under my cousin's guardian. is no slight punishment for the indulg. ship, have only convinced me that if my ence of a passion as presumptuous in regard and esteem were shared by you, itself as it is injurious to your happiness. my heart was undivided and Valence Beautiful Lilias, forgive me!" Harcourt's.”

“ Forgive you, Constantine? rather A pause succeeded this speech, which let me ask your forgiveness for rejecting flowed in trembling but wondrous sweet the regard of which I am unworthy." accents from the red lips of as magnifi- Forgive me, I repeat, my dear cent a creature as ever breathed in the cousin,” mildly persisted Sir Constanbloom of twenty summers.

tine, “and thus accept the atonement Stately in height and developing in for my folly!" her figure, all that symmetry which em- “Oh, speak not thus Constantine," bellishes a soft and round contour; her replied the weeping Lilias—“if indeed blooming cheeks veiled with clusters of you wish me to be happy in my choice, dark auburn hair, her bright forehead, do not make me feel how much excellence

that choice has made unhappy!"

Trembling like a reed in the gentle the pallid cheeks and agitated features of grasp, that Lilias twined around his the two, whose interesting converse we powerful arm, Darrell gave one look of have just now related, and on whose ineffable agonizing fondness on the lovely emotion a long line of august ancestry, creature, whom that hour had for the glowing on the lofty wainscot, in the first time shewn as lost to him for ever, gorgeous costumes of Holbeins, Zucchero, - and then in broken accents said and Anthony Vandyke, looked cold and

“You make my hard task harder Lilias solemn and sad. -but, help me justice, reason, manhood Lilias Fortescue had scarcely quitted --and I will now speak the last words the room, where she remained but a you shall ever hear from me on this short time after Sir Constantine's hasty bitter subject. —

departure,--when a small oak door was “Here then I utterly disclaim, and, cautiously opened, communicating with from my heart and thoughts, banish for an old chapel now long disused for deever, all feud, aversion, and distrust-all votional purposes, but in whose various memory of ancestral hatreds, all feeling crypts a cold chine of beef, a venison of ancestral wrongs—unkindness, cold- pasty, a gammon of bacon, or a great ness, and injurious malice; that, like a apple-pie, with thick crust, together with host of weeds, have grown and flowered, surdry bottles of strong beer and wine, and shed their seed, between my father's were always to be found. house and Valence Harcourt's. I will, The door, then, communicating with to-morrow, myself take horse for New. this desecrated sanctuary was quietly bold Harcourt, tender my regrets to opened, ushering into the oak-parlour, Master Valence for our long estrange- a tall thin young man, on whose countement,-offer him a gentleman's desire nance (otherwise far from unhandsome), for his friendship, a kinsman's sanction cunning had written its indelible chá. to his love ;—and then, (may righteous racters the more frightfully, as they were heaven help me to fulfil my purpose, of blended with the ravages of its unwonted mastering myself!) we will meet, con- companions, dissipation and excess. verse, visit, as if this folly had never He had a fine ger falcon on his fist; invaded my brain, and Lilias Fortescue's and the tinkle of her silver Milan bells, husband, shall be my-brother.”

as he carefully placed her on her perch, “ Bless you, God bless you dear, had not ceased, when he began, after a dear Constantine! for those words,” cautious survey of the chamber,—"Soh! Lilias began,--but manhood's self could peers the king-fisher's beak into that du and bear no more; and it was only quarter, my most precious and precise his abrupt and agitated departure from brother ?-1' faith thou hast too much of her presence, that prevented Lilias the flesh in thee for a saint,—but art far Fortescue from witnessing that most rare too saintly to be a man !-and you too, and consequently distressing of all displays peerless mistress Lilias ! none but of grief, a strong man convulsed with Valence Harcourt, forsooth, may serve sobs and lifting up his voice in tears !- your turn ?--and it was for him you

This happened at high noon, in the spurned my suit ?-for the old foe of great oak-wainscoted parlour at Dark- our family, the family of your proud elms, what time the Midsummer sun mother, that you told me, words of love struggled through the proud heraldic from me were worse than ribald insult to coats, that darkened the little diamond your ears ? '_'twas for the half starved panes in the latticed bays ; now reposing papist's sake you said, ay swore (for ye in chequered lustre upon the large double called heaven to witness), that a bowl of desk, with its enormous church Bible on wolfsbane were more welcome to your one side, and its grim book of martyrs lips than the deadly sweetness of mine! with fearful coloured pictures on the Now if I be not revenged on ye both,other ;—now lighting on the furry spoils may I be still the scorn of either! If I of foxes, otters, badgers, and wild-cats, do not use to the utmost the weapons that adorned the gloomy polished panels, fortune hath put into mine hand-may plentifully interspersed with hunting and I still, good brother, be the butt of hawking poles, and the haughty antlers thy supercilious rebukes,—the bedesman of many a hart of grease ;-now slumber- of thine eleemosynary contempt ;-still, ing upon the broad hearth paved with over-weening woman, kneel and grovel brick, where reposed a couple of hounds at thy feet only to be spurned from them most amicably with a choice black and with scorn !” and thus muttering, in tan terrier, and a spaniel ; and occasion- such tort, as if he feared the very pictures ally disguising with its motley blazon, of his frowning ancestors should hear the

speech which his fury rendered it im- is known that, idle and profligate in his possible to confine to his own dark bosom, father's lifetime, he had been banished Giles Darrell rushed from the oak from Darkelms; that it was Constantine's parlour, in as great discomposure (but affection which had vainly pleaded for from how different a cause !) as his elder him, until death put a period to the brother.

offended parent's implacable ire, Con. The old bowling-green, at Darkelms, stantine's first act of power which sought still remains, a fine specimen of that and reclaimed him from his abandoned ancient place of amusement; one of the haunts,--Constantine's generosity that very few, which, having been popular, gave him threefold the sum his angry centuries ago,-continue in vogue with father had bequeathed,and, finally, us to the present day.

Constantine's patient benevolence which, A great square inclosure, surrounded after Giles had again and again resumed by high stone walls, contained a spacious his guilty habits, still bore with his plat of the most delicate turf, whose manners, and still supplied his exisurface of lively green had acquired, from gencies, giving him, at length, an equal the gardener's constant care,—all the share in his house and purse, the smoothness and almost firmness of a desperate and vain hope of at last marble pavement.

changing his dissolute propensities. At regular distances, in the walls, When all this is considered, we shall were semicircular alcoves, or rather surely wonder at the heartless wicked niches for seats--the entrances to which, ness that worthless brother is about to were through openings in the enormous manifest. Alas! it is but too indisputable yew hedge which, smoothly shorn, lined a truth, that to load the wicked with the whole interior of the wall, and which kindness is not only to heap coals of fire if not equal to it in solidity, was at least upon their heads, but to kindle a de. twice its thickness; square, compact, and vouring flame in their hearts, and put a trim as old Adam's clippers could make two-edged sword in their hands! it. Two lofty pillars, surmounted with On entering the lower room of the large balls, (with which the wall itself summer-ball, a handsome apartment was dotted at intervals) formed the hung with green taffeta, on which the entrance; and right opposite, at the story of Semiramis was embroidered in farther extremity, stood a stately summer- gold and silver tissue, Sir Constantine hall, or banquetting-room (as it was partially drew the curtain of silk, so as called), consisting of two stories, raised to screen off a portion of the intolerable upon a basement of arching pillars, with brilliance that blazed through the tall large windows on every side; its steep windows; and, having poured out wine roof terminating almost in a point, and to his brother, and pledged him, drew surmounted by a prodigious gilded ball his chair closer to him, and in' a firm and vane.

voice and deliberate manner, narrated, It was now the evening of the day, on from point to point, the eventful conwhich Lilias had made her reluctant versation he had, that morning, held confession to Sir Constantine Darrell, with Lilias Fortescue. and the level light of a glorious summer “ Thus you see, dear Giles, we are sunset, had begun to emblaze the great brothers in disappointment. The vain windows of the banquet-room with hope which sprung up in my heart when molten gold, when the elder Darrell, you were rejected by Lilias, that it was having mechanically gone through several for my sake she refused your suit, even games of his favourite amusement with you may forgive, now that it hath been his brother, declared himself on a sudden so bitterly blighted.” wearied, he knew not why, and tossing Nay, brother, talk not of forgiveness the round sand bowls with which they to one who, regarding you as his patron, had been playing to a corner of the can but behold all your conduct in one green, invited his brother to the summer- light; my gratitude is already too big hall, on the pretext of partaking of the for my poor heart, and, while I live, wine and cates which were always set body and spirit must be tied to you for out for the refreshment of the bowlers. ever by the strong fetters of obligation."

Giles Darrell assented, and as he was Trust me, good brother ! I would not following to the pavilion, smiled. have it so; be but so far bound to me

This young man has, we apprehend, as true love inclinés you; and in aught already spoken for himself far more than else be free as the air to pursue your enough to afford an unfavourable im- own interests ; but now listen : to-morpression of his character; but, when it row I set forth to Newbold Harcourt. I go without attendants, not only be- blest light looked down on such wicked cause I brook not witnesses, lest my own violators of her peaceful reign as now heart may not keep its true tone, but stood in whispered converse under the also for that I would not seem to him vast shadow of the old water-tower. ostentatious in this dreadful sacrifice." The group consisted of three or four

You purpose then to apprise this ringleaders in the ruffian band, with Valence Harcourt of our fair cousin's which Giles Darrell's broken fortunes, preference ?"

and, still worse, his dissipated propenAnd to add to it, (false as I shall be sities had long identified him; that to my feelings), my approbation." worthy himself was haranguing them

“ Constantine ! there has been blood in suppressed tones, but with vehement between our ancestors and his."

gesticulations. "It has lost its red dye from time, Giles." " The time is now come,

," he said, “Our father hated him deadly.” " when I may shake off the insupportable

“Our mother's brother loved him load of degradation under which I have fondly, and I myself am weary of hating; so long groaned, and you, my brave and any occasion of peace but this, I would faithful associates, may share with me have embraced with joy; and even this, the long hoarded spoil of this lofty, such as it is, I will not decline !"

grand, sententious brotber of mine.I “ Have with you then; I too will go hate him ! need I tell you how I hate to Newbold Harcourt! do you start, him, you who know how he helped Sir Constantine? would you have him to foil my suit with yonder haughty think that, worthless as Giles Darrell is maiden, and have now to learn that, in the world's eye, he cannot imitate, at being himself supplanted in his turn, he least, his nobler brother's generosity? I meditates a masterstroke of saintly powill go with you to Newbold to-morrow !" licy, no less, good wot! than to be in

Sir Constantine arose, warmly elasped his own person his fair cousin's ambashis brother's hand, and his fine counte- sador to that papist paramour of hers, nance beaming with satisfaction, ex- Valence Harcourt; that thus, plucking claimed

jewels from the hole into which he has “ Will you indeed, dear Giles ? this is fallen, he may return to the admiring beyond my hopes ; but dare you trust world all the disgrace of the rejected yourself? have you thought what it will suitor lost in the grandeur of the selfcost of manhood to seek in Valence denying saint. - Marry! such heroism Harcourt, not only our old family foe, but suits not me; then be you but prompt the man who has turned aside the to aid me, and Sir Constantine Darrell current of your affeetions? have you shall scarcely interweave laurels with his weighed the anguish, not only of losing willow wreath!" your love, but of formally yielding her Giles Darrell then proceeded to unto another !"

fold at full his nefarious plot. Sir Con“I have not weighed all this, good stantine, while riding in his company, brother! nor need I; your presence was to be attacked by a large band of shall be my strength and shield.” the ruffians, at an hour and spot by him

“In faith, Giles, I must doubt my pointed out, between Darkelms and power to hold my own! but the effort Newbold Harcourt.; Giles was 'to at least is glorious, and shall be made. make a feint of defending his brother, Come then, Giles,-come with me to and, to give the pretence, (aş he scofLilias, and shew her too that you can fingly said), some colour, was to be rival me in devotion to her happiness !” slightly wounded by the assailants.

Nay, Constantine! hold me excused "I will contrive,” he continued, to there ; my new resolve sits on me, at drop from my horse, as if desperately present, uneasy as unproved armour ! wounded, and then, but not till then, Go you, to lovely Mistress Lilias, and surround and drag Sir Constantine from paint me better than she thinks, or haply his !". than I deserve. I will to the wood! a Ay!-ay! was the grinning reply; twilight meditation may help me much.” « and then a home-thrust or two; and

And so the brothers parted for that long live Sir Giles Darrell !” night.

“Not for your lives! you would The moon was sailing high in the frustrate the best half of my purpose ; blue heavens, flickering, as she had often Constantine must be secured, but not done before, the reverend woods of hurt more than is necessary. This old Darkelms with delicious lustre and tower, thanks to our nightly mummeries, gloom, but, surely, never before had her 'is universally considered as a place ac

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