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OF FICTION, POETRY, HISTORY, AND GENERAL LITERATURE.

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on the smooth turf; the ivied arches of became accustomed to it, his villanous the bridge stretched their gaps of light, heart was by no means cheered by the strongly contrasted with their ebon spectacle of a hideous gulf, whose gi. buttresses, across the sparkling Derwent, gantic hollows were partly revealed in and the solitary night prowler, dissatis- revolting distinctness, and partly left to fied with the utter stillness and loneli, imagination, that excellent exaggeration ness, which might have seemed his safe- of horror. Giles Darrell, however, was guard, looked up, suspiciously, ever and too well marled in guilt's brazen hardi. anon, at the clear serene luminary, as if hood to start at shadows, and before he in her broad eye he beheld at once a proceeded to descend the inner flight of witness and a judge!

steps, he unveiled his lantern, and proAnd thus amidst profound silence, duced, instantaneously, a wide, strong, which was dreadful to him, and beneath and clear light, which shewed him, at a splendid moonlight, which he hated, once, the mighty, cubits of the waterthis bad man approached the shadowy tower in all their grim dimensions. precincts of the dark hushed wood, and What makes Giles Darrell start ? is mounting the long steps of the sombre it fear lest the depth below should water-tower, whose lofty bulk still hid swallow up the monster of wickedness, the rising moon, he touched the spring or the heights above tumble down and of the ponderous and iron-banded portal, bury him? No! it is that to the keenest which heavily and groaningly unfolded, investigation of his eye, aided by the awakening and redoubling a long dismal deep darting radiance of his lamp, his echo through the deep abysm of the victim is invisible—his brother is not pile. A strong flood of moonlight there! from the panelless orifice of a large round In an agony of exasperation he rushed window high up on the opposite side, down the stairs, and, just as he had acalmost dazzled him at first, with its complished half of the descent, an ghastful radiance, and when his eye explosion, as of thunder, rebellowed

through the hollow building; it was rific volume of water, foaming, boiling, from the sudden closing of the door by and bellowing, leaped down through it, which he had entered the water-tower, with such violence, that it was only a and whose opening Giles Darrell too bliod instinctive effort of self preservawell knew could only be achieved from tion that hurried the astounded Giles without! A bandoning, for the moment, back into the water-tower, and he was every other thought, he rushed with half way up its steep stairs before his frantic haste up the steps to the fatal scattered senses could rally from their door, and, setting down his lantern, bewilderment sufficiently to ascertain assayed, with trembling fingers, the the nature and extent of this new horror. treacherous spring, in vain; be then His situation was indeed fearful; the tried force, but, after a few false at- lantern had been dropped and extempts of impotent rage, the massive tinguished in his sudden panic; and he portal with its oaken planks and iron was now once more abandoned to his studs, convinced him, that even inani- old scarecrow the moonlight. The roar mate things might be almost as remorse- and rush of the water below was most less as a bad man's covetousness and appalling. For some time, such was lust.

the partial darkness in which this treFury now seemed to possess him mendous cistern was involved, it was wholly; well did be deem it impossible only by the increased violence of the that his brother could have gone far; cataract that uttered its menacing roar and abandoning his milder purpose, he from the distant vault, like the howls of snatched up the lamp, drew his dagger, a wilderness of hyænas, and by the and once more rushed down the steps, heavy boom with which the surging resolved that Sir Constantine at least food thundered against the black walls should not escape him; and having of the water-tower, that Darrell knew despatched and concealed him, (which the water was gradually and rapidly he judged would be no difficult task,) rising. he purposed awaiting in the tower till But at last the cruel, the avenging fortune should suggest some means of moonlight shewed the pent-up wretch deliverance, to which he was the more the certain approach of his destruction, encouraged, as the basket he brought by touching the sullen tides, as they with him contained viands, which, duly swelled upward, with her silver light, as managed, might at least last him several if she met them with welcome, saluting days, and it was more than probable, and inviting them to devour the villain, that, long ere that period, some of his who had profaned and violated her reign forest associates would come to his de- by his nefarious purposes. Meanwhile, Jiverance; and then it was but a specious Giles Darrell was more than balf puntale to those of Darkelms, and all would ished. There is ever something pecube right again: but now Constantine liarly gloomy, if not appalling to the must, inevitably, be put out of the way; eye, in the appearance of a body of and with his mind bent up to this water, pent up and roofed in, be the resolve, Giles Darrell, lamp and dagger place ever so familiar, and the light ever in hand, rushed into the vaulted passage

so clear. But to behold it in all the at the bottom of the water-tower. exaggerated ghastliness of night and

As he traversed its low-browed and moonlight, gradually advancing to what narrow shaft he was suddenly arrested, he knew to be bis certain death, overby observing that, at a certain point, the flowing step after step of a barricaded roof rose abruptly to a considerable tower, from which he had ascertained height, resembling a large kitchen chim- the impossibility of escape, was an inney, or rather the interior of a church fliction (it must be confessed) commensteeple, while the light of his lantern surate even to Giles Darrell's multiplied just reached high enough to shew him enormities. The fury of the flood-gates what appeared to be a door; it was, in the vault, which still maintained their however, too far from the ground to deafening hurly-burly, was awfully conadmit the idea of Sir Constantine hav- trasted with the tremendous tranquillity ing effected his escape by that outlet, in which the watery monster, now halfand Master Giles was just on the point way up the water tower, and weltering of renewing his search, when an extra- in the moonlight, strode towards its ordinary noise, like the roar of many paralysed victim. It had attained within waters was suddenly heard above; in two steps of that on which Giles sate, another instant, the floodgate, (for snch with clenched hands, meditating by one it was,) flew up its grooves, and a ter- desperate plunge to terminate his hor. rible suspense, when the heavy sound of called John-Anthony Sergio, (whose the descending flood-gates was heard name has been preserved from oblivion from the vault; the roar of waters gave solely by Galiani's witty revenge) sternly place to a death-like silence; the floods forbade him to recite it. All those peceased to rise ; still and silent the moon- dantic and puerile cunclaves were open light fell on them as upon a steel mirror : to ridicule on a hundred sides; but a Giles Darrell was safe--but the nature lucky coincidence afforded Galiani a most of his sufferings through all that night stinging point. may neither be expressed nor conceived. It was the tiresome custom of the

When the chaplain and two of the academies to publish cumbrous collecdomestics from Darkelms came at sun- tions of prose and verse at the death of rise the next morning to release him, all every grand or titled personage. А reproach and sarcasm died within their simple cavalier might get off with a hearts, when they discovered that, from duodecimo, a baron with an octavo, but a raven black, Giles Darrell's hair had when you came to marquises, dukes and become white as December's snow ! princes, (particularly if they died rich,) Camphill, Nov. 24th, 1836.

nothing less than a quarto would suffice; and as for princes and princesses of the

blood-royal, kings, queens, emperors THE ABBE GALIANI.

and empresses, a folio, full of sighs and

tears, eulogiums and comparisons, was An impertinent Frenchma of the last considered a light weight to lay upon century seriously puts this question : their tombs. There was no possibility “ Can a German possibly have wit?" for a person of any fortune or name, or

With better reason, some people may fame of any kind, to escape and go ask, “Was their ever a witty political quietly and modestly to the grave, economist ?” We can answer in the without their shades being made to affirmative:-there once was one.

blush at the hyperboles and extravagant Ferdinando Galiani was not more dis- eulogiums of these, shameless incorportinguished in his day by his many ex- ated poetasters. A hundred sonnets, to say cellent writings, chiefly on subjects con- nothing of elegies and eclogues, often nected with what we now call political arose out of the demise of an antiquated economy, than he was by the readiness maid-of-honour; and we have seen an and playfulness of his wit and his ex- equal number devoted to the memory of quisite humour. Unfortunately, the best the king's first fiddler. In order not to of his sayings perished with him, or with be taken unawares, or to be pressed for his contemporaries and associates. time, these academicians were accus

He was born at Chieti, the capital of tomed to prepare beforehand, and there the province of Abruzzo, in the kingdom was scarcely one among them but (like of Naples, at the end of the year 1728, the Persian poet in Anastasius) could at and came into the world sadly deformed. any moment have said to his friends or He went through his studies in the city patrons, “ Gentlemen! you may all die of Naples, where, from his early youth, perfectly easy; I have an epitaph for his gay and facetious spirit made his every one of you ready in my pocket.” society to be much courted. At that A few days after Galiani's quarrel time the Neapolitans had a number of with the president John-Anthony, who poetic academies and hackneyed literary was one of the most prolific of these societies, which did a great deal of harm panegyrists of little-great people, the to poetry and literature, and finished, Jack-Ketch of Naples chanced to die; like the Arcadia of Rome, by becoming and this event furnished the Abbé with thoroughly ridiculous. The Abbé's bro- the opportunity of revenging himself, ther, the Marquis Galiani, who had and exposing an absurd custom at the distinguished himself by a translation of same time. Vitruvius, had to deliver in one of these Having set diligently to work, Galiani academies an oration on the miraculous soon produced a volume under the fol. conception of the Virgin Mary; but, lowing title : “ Various Compositions being unexpectedly obliged to set off on for the Death of Dominick Jannacone, a journey, he begged the Abbé to supply Hangman of the Grand Court of the his place. The Abbé accordingly com- Vicaria; collected and published by posed a panegyric on the Virgin in the John- Anthony Sergio, Neapolitan adusual forms; but when he presented vocate.” - himself among the academicians, the The humorous imitations of style, president, a certain Neapolitan advocate, the general felicity of this piece of

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burlesque, filled all Italy with laughter; dialogue, contrived, not only to treat the and, if it did not destroy, it tended to solemn subject in a more correct and diminish the academical nuisances de convincing manner than any of his conscribed above.

temporaries, but to render it amusing Among his numerous studies Gsliani and attractive to all the world by the turned his attention to mineralogy and gaiety and wit with which, to the sur. volcanoes ; and having formed a com- prise of everybody, he invested its plete collection of the stones, lava, and usually repulsive dryness. For several other volcanic materials ejected during weeks, all Paris could talk of nothing different eruptions by Mount Vesuvius, else, but it was never suspected at the he packed it up as a present for the time that so much wit and such French Pope, and being miserably poor at the could proceed from any one but a time, he wrote the large chest, Frenchman. Voltaire, who was Beatissime Paler, fac ut lapides isti tainly a great judge of wit, says of these panes fiant."

Corn Dialogues, in a letter to Diderot, The Pope thus addressed was Bene. “ Dans ce livre il me semble que Platon dict the Fourteenth, better known among et Molière se soient réunis pour comus by his family name Ganganelli. Like poser l'ouvrage On n'a jamai: several other of the Roman pontiffs, he raisonné ni mieux, ni plus plaisamwas a wit himself, and a warm admirer ment :.. Oh le plaisant livre, le of wit in other men, and “he performed charmant livre, que Les Dialogues sur the miracle asked of him” (as the le Commerce des Blés !" Italian biographers say), by giving Frederick the Great of Prussia, was Galiani a canonry worth four hundred equally enchanted with the wisdom and

spirit of the Dialogues; but Galiani, His admirable talent for business as who had thrown them off, currente well as for conversation, recommended calamo, almost without an effort, used Galiani to a congenial spirit, the witty to wonder that people should find them Marquis of Caraccioli, at whose request so extraordinary. The little hump(in 1765) the Abbé was sent to Paris backed Abbé became a star of the first in quality of secretary of embassy. magnitude even in the eyes of the ladies

In tlie absence of the ambassador, of beauty, rank, and fashion; and it Galiani presented himself alone at the was in speaking of him that the Duchess court of Louis the Fifteenth. In stature of Choiseul used to say, '“En France il he was a dwarf, and a prominent hump y a de l'esprit en petite monnoie, et en did not add to the beauty of the Abbé's Italie en lingots." person. The ill-bred courtiers of that When interrogated by a great talker, base-minded vulgar king burst out into who wanted to know how it was that he loud laughter at his appearance; but had so much wit constantly at command, Galiani, without being at all disturbed the Abbé lifted his shoulders and said, by this, said to Louis, “Sire, vous “I don't know that I have what you voyez à present l'échantillon du secré. give me credit for, but if I have any wit, taire, le secrétaire vient après.'

it is because I don't seek for it." The readiness of his repartees, his In the correspondence of Grimm, the searching sarcasms, the originality and quondam friend of Rousseau, frequent comprehensiveness of his mind, soon mention is made of Galiani, who was made the Abbé one of the lions of held in singular estimation by the soParisian society, and brought him ac- ciety of the Baron d'Holbach, and the quainted with all the most celebrated other scientific and literary coteries French philosophers, economists, and which Grimm most frequented. wils of that period; among whom it On returning to his native country, was found that, though speaking a fo- in 1770, the witty Abbé was made reign language, he could beat most of counsellor of the chamber of commerce; the beaux esprits who used their own. and he was afterwards promoted to a

Not long after, he shewed that he high post in the finance department. could write French even better than he He had a good hearty relish for life, spoke it, and that he could be as witty and lived prosperously and happily ; but with his pen as with his tongue. The this did not hinder him from dying French economists having got up a cheerfully. When his last moment was furious contest on the question of the approaching, he took leave of his friends liberty or restriction of the corn-trade, with these words: “You must excuse Galiani entered the arena incognito ; me, gentlemen, but the dead have sent and, in a little work in the form of a me a card of invitation for their con. BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICE OF the same pontiff, near the thermæ of DOMENICHO FONTANA, Diocletian, transformed by Michael ARCHITECT TO POPE SIXTUS V.

versazione."

Angelo into a church for the brethren of

the Chartreux. The cupola of St. Peter's When this Italian architect and engineer church was not yet finished ; Sixtus the made his appearance in the arena, upon Fifth was anxious that Fontana and which Le Bramante, San-Gallo, Vignole, Jacques della Porto, an architect equally Palladio, the great Michael Angelo, and skilful, should take upon themselves a so many other men of genius had reared work which could not fail to bestow lustre their ever-memorable monuments, not upon his pontificate; but first of all, the only did he shew himself worthy to walk pope judged that an obelisk would form in their steps, but displayed his capacity an imposing decoration for the area to achieve a name by a talent peculiar to necessary to be traversed before the himself for the erection of obelisks. He spectator reached that temple, which in was born at the village of Mili, near the magnificence far surpassed every other lake of Como, in 1543. The study of throughout the world. Near to the old geometry facilitated his first progress in sacristy of this edifice, had been , half his favourite pursuits, and at the age of buried amidst heaps of crumbled fraglwenty, he repaired to Rome, where his ments and rubbish, one of those 'inonu. brother was already exercising the pro- ments consecrated according to a somefession of an architect. Domenicho, what doubtful (hieroglyphic) tradition, whilst engaged in studying the precious to the son of Sesostris, and transported to remains of ancient art and the chefs Rome under Caligula. This obelisk d'æuvres of the great modern masters, was was of red granite, hewn from the not long in establishing a commendable mountains in the neighbourhood of reputation for himself. The Cardinal Thebes in Egypt, and taking in the Montalto chose him for his architect, entire apex, presented a length of 111} and under his auspices he commenced palms; its breadth at the base, twelve; the erection of a chapel in Santa Maria and eight at the summit. More than Majora, as well as that of a small palace, one pope, before Sixtus V, had had the in the garden of that basilica. Montalto, intention of causing its transportation to following the example of many other the centre of that area; but the project prelates and Italian princes, was desirous failed being carried into execution, in of attaching his name to works of an consequence of the parties agitating it imposing character. He was anxious being unable to agree upon the method that Fontana should spare no expense in necessary to be employed; and more the execution of his plans, and he was especially, because they had been frightobeyed; but Montalto, afterwards so ened at the difficulty of its transportation, famous as Sixtus V, was born in the and the immense expense necessarily bosom of indigence. He found it ne

demanded. Sixtus the Fifth, detercessary, in order to support his rank, to mining to surmount all these obstacles, have recourse to the pensions which addressed himself to the task in a solemn Gregory XIII had from time to time manner as it were, and summoned the granted him. This pontiff dissatisfied, collective intelligence of the most skilful and perhaps jealous of the magnificence mathematicians, engineers, and architects which the cardinal affected in the con- of Europe. They were to the number struction of these edifices, ceased to of five hundred, it is said ; and each of furnish him with money; and the labours them tendered, in demonstration of his of Fontana might have been interrupted, method, a model, plan, or treatise at the had he not felt himself piqued to finish very least. Their opinions, as may be them at his own expense, devoting to imagined, were very much divided. that purpose one thousand Roman crowns, Fontana was one of those who presented the result of his savings.

a model. The obelisk, half sunk in the He had good cause to facilitate him- earth, was still somewhat erect, self upon having thus preferred the grand question consisted in ascertaining attachment of his patron and love of whether a trial should be made to transfame to calculations of self-interest : port it thus, after freeing it from that Montalto shortly succeeded to the pon- by which it was encumbered, or whether tifical throne, and confirmed him in the they should begin by bringing it entirely title of his architect; and the completion down. Fontana was of this latter opinion. of his chapel as well as that of the palace He maintained, contrary to the general was not long delayed. Fontana con- opinion, that it was more convenient to structed another immediately after, for transport the obelisk in a horizontal

The

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