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position, and only to raise it on its of any which had been accomplished
reaching the area. Fontana had the under his pontificate. He caused two
happiness of seeing his project accepted; medals to be struck in memory of the
though under certain circumstances, event; ennobled Fontana, and created
which, occurring at that juncture, had him a knight of the golden spur. To
so seriously brought him under the pope's these honours he further added more
displeasure, that, had a failure in the solid recompense: he caused five thousand
enterprise ensued, it would in all proba- gold crowns to be paid him, and bestowed
bility have entailed the forfeiture of his upon him a pension of two thousand
life. Confident in his own resources, crowns, with reversion to his heirs.
his exaltation however, was at first some- Fontana had likewise all the carpentering-
what diminished by the adjunction of work and materials, which alone pro-
two colleagues, Jacques della Porta, and duced him no less a sum than twenty
Bartelemi Annanati, nominated by thousand Roman crowns.
Sixtus V, for concurrent assistance in the
work; but consequent upon the event of
the before mentioned circumstances, it

FAUST'S REPLY,
was ultimately decreed, that Fontana

ON MARGARET INQUIRING, IF HE should alone risk an attempt, of which he

BELIEVED IN GOD.
should alone receive the glory. It
would be impossible to detail in this
brief biographical sketch, all the processes

(For the Parterre. )
employed by the architect to dislodge,
remove, and raise a mass of eight hundred Oh who can name Him ?
million pounds weight; it suffices to

And who dare avow,
state, that Fontana employed not less

“ I do believe in Him?" than between eight and nine hundred

Or who shall now, workmen, and one hundred and forty Possessing feeling, dare, horses. He commenced by lowering the Presumptuously declare, obelisk ; they then proceeded to raise it That he believeth not? tive palms from the ground.

The All-enfolding!
succeeded doing, in the sight of an im-

The All-upholding!
mense crowd, to which a vigorous silence Encompasses, sustains not he
was prescribed, under pain of the most

Thee-ine-His own divinity ?
severe punishment. The sound of a Doth not the mighty vaulted sky
trumpet, upon a signal being given by

Stretch its wide arch around, on high?
the architect, regulated all the move- Doth not the quiet earth below
ments, and that of bells, the periods for Lie stedfast? and the solemn flow
repose.
The obelisk was brought upon

Of twinkling stars eternally arise,
St. Peter's Place, extended horizontally Cheering with friendly light the bound-
upon four rollers.
The next operation

less skies?
necessary, was to raise it upon its pedestal, And are we not e'en now,
and at length upon the 10th of September, 'Gaging love's gentle vow,
1586, the day upon which the Duke Deep in each other's eyes ?
de Piney Luxembourg, ambassador of Doth not all this come crowding o'er
Henry Quaftre, made his entry into thee,
Rome, Fontana effected the completion Filling thine head and heart,
of this prodigious undertaking. The Weaving in mysteries around thee,
operation had commenced at day-break,

Not with thee-not apart?
and was finished in fifty-two successive Let then thine heart, big as it is,
essays by sunset.
One must be pene-

With these emotions fill,-
trated with the same enthusiasm, felt by And when thou'rt flowing o'er with
the inhabitants of Rome, for the arts in

bliss,
general, and for whatever tends to en- Then name this mystic thrill,
hance the magnificence of the Eternal And, as thou wilt, say it is joy,–
City, to form an idea of the transports

Or heart,

-or love,-
and exclamations, which recompensed Or call it-God-
Fontana for his labours. His workmen No name can I employ,
carried him in triumph upon their 'Tis feeling that is all in all,
shoulders, amid the clangour of drums Name, is but sound's void flow
and trumpets.

Sixtus V. was no less Or vapour, with its misty thrall
sensible of the success of such an under- Inshrouding Heaven's glow.
taking; the most important and imposing 25th Nov. 1836.

CAROLUS.

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CHAPTER I.

cure it.

THE INDIAN BRIDAL. am called Ah-kitch-e-tah, the soldier,'
A TRADITIONAL TALE.

for my deeds, and three scalps hang in
my wigwam ?"

· Yes, alas !" sighed the girl; “but OM-PAY-T00-WASH-TAY, the “beautiful from whose heads were they taken? men dawn," was an Indian girl, fair in com- whose skin was red-redder," she said, plexion for one of her tribe, the most emphatically, “than yours; whose foresymmetrical in figure among the daugh- fathers smoked the pipe of peace at the ters of her people.

same fire with my forefathers; go, take “ Om-pay-too-wash-tay!”

down your trophies, rub your face with “What would you ?” answered the black, and mourn for the red-men you virgin.

have slain." “I would that my words be not like Her lover looked on her as she spoke, the stone cast in the river-which makes and the eager glance with which he a noise, sinks, and is forgotten."

answered her last words seemed to de“ What do you mean?”

mand, “what further shall I do ?” “ Have I not piled the venison in But searching into his innermost soul your lodge—killed the buffaloes whose she kept her eyes immovably on his, nor skins form your couch ?”

vouchsafed him a reply. “ Toshe-yes,” she murmured, "but “ Speak,” entreated he; " tell me what it is because you left them there; ask more to perform.” no favours for your gifts ; take them “ That,” she answered sternly, “to back if you feel sorry you gave them. make me proud of the father of my The father and brothers of Om-pay-too children! I love you, Ah-kitch-e-tah; can kill deer and carry enough skins to but I repeat, I am a chief's daughter, the trader to feed and deck her in beads and he that weds me must make himself and ribbands.”

a warrior of renown." “I was not asking for what I gave The young man eyed her in surprise, you; I was but telling Om-pay-too that and bethought that her brain must my heart was sore and that she can wander. Have I not helped you when “ Om-pay-too's words

are like a our people journeyed, and made music muddy lake," said he, “through which on the cha-ton-kah the livelong night the bottom cannot be seen. while you slept, and still Om-pay-too “She will tell you her meaning, the loves me not !”

Great Spirit gave me a dream last night, “I do love you," returned the maid, and I saw a young doe which ran through fervidly; but still with such a rigid the woods; it went here and there coldness in her beautiful countenance as wherever it chose ; its father and mother almost contradicted her words ; “ but played by its side, and the flock of its there are others I love more ; yes, Ah- relations roamed where they pleased; kitch-e-tah, more than myself.”

then I felt glad and wished that I was “Who are they ?” anxiously de- the doe. But after a while a herd of manded the youth, seizing her hands in wolves came and drove the poor fawn his with convulsive grasp.

and its relations away to-day and farther “My people,” answered she, with- to-morrow and still farther next day, and drawing her hands, while the soul- every evening when the sun went to kindled fire of enthusiasm illumined her sleep, they were more distant from the features. “ My people,” she repeated ; spot it found them in the morning; and “ the graves of my fathers—the bones there was a young buck kept at the side of of the warriors and braves who have the doe ; he wanted to marry her ; but her passed away but are not forgotten. heart was sad, and she drooped more and Om-pay-too is the daughter of a chief; more as they journeyed on. One night the blood of her father fills her veins, the Great Spirit visited her in a dream the heart of her father beats in her and told her what to do, then she arose bosom, and one must do more than while all were asleep and took out her hunt, more than blow music, ere she heart and cut it in seven pieces and tied will share his wigwam and be the mother it on to the foreheads of seven of her of his children."

foes who lived nearest to her." “What else do you ask,” cried the The youth clasped his hands, a thrill youth, as if determined to surmount of agony shook his frame, the big tear every obstacle in the way of possessing stood in his eye, but she continued her. “ Am I not a brave, a warrior ? “ The next day when the buck asked The skunk's skin hangs at my knee. I her to marry, go, get my heart,' said

CHAPTER IV.

is weak,"

she, 'if you wish to keep it.'

Ha! are

of the warrior who has bound her head the words of my mouth now like muddy with seven fair-haired scalps, the scalps water, or is the head of Ah-kitch-e-tal of her enemies, the enemies of her like the brow of the buffalo, which people." nothing can penetrate ? "

And as she spoke the dance continued, And as she leaned toward him, a fierce the whoop of victory rent the air ; the laugh burst from her lips, a wild fire scalps fastened on the poles were waved from her eye.

aloft, then trampled under foot. The warrior started, and struck his Still the wild song of revenge was hand heavily on his heart as he cried, heard—the chorus of savage mirth rang They are my friends !”

on the new-born day-the fierce yell of “Om-pay-ioo," she answered calmly, triumph echoed up to heaven. with a sneer, "asks nothing, bids nothing. The hands of her father and her brothers, which have been dipped elbow

When the excitement of the dance deep in Sac blood, can do all the Sioux

was over, when the bride slept in her girl asks; the foolish girl gave the preference to Ah-kitch-e-tah, who said his night rested on all, Ah-kitch-e-tah rose

new wigwam and the chill darkness of heart was sore ; let him add, whose heart from the nuptial-bed and sought the

outskirts of the wood; a deep gloom “ Hear me! hear me!” gasped the pervaded his mind and his haggard cheek youth, imploringly; "when I had no

told a tale of grief as he looked on the thing to eat, they fed me, when I was

smouldering ruin of the trader's mansion. dying, their big medicine cured me

He reflected that those people, though • The man who steals your wigwam, the very spot on which it stands," inter: white, had saved his life, had protected rupted she, stamping her foot with in reward he had fired their house ;

his people from the frosts of winter, and indignation; may give you a stick of his single arm had torn the scalps from wood out of it without hurting himself.

the mother, the father and their children, But I must go,” she added, raising ber hands to her temples, and making a

and this to gratify a squaw who loved semicircular motion about her head with revenge better than she did him, who each, “They must hang here when Om. thirsted for blood more than for his pay-too is a bride!” and her startling he listened to the crackling of the

affection, and his soul sickened as shriek broke the silence of the forest.

tenement before him, and recollected

that he, though an Indian woman's child, Three days have passed; it is morning; of too late repentance rush from his eyes,

was the son of a white man; the tears the sun is rising, his golden disk just

a groan of misery burst from his breast. visible ; a number of skin lodges form dusky spots on the small plain thickly He flew back to his lodge—when the enclosed by trees and undershrub, nearly the dead body of the half-bred rolled at

bride awoke at the report of a rifle, and impervious to all but the natives of those

her feet! wilds. Hark! a noise breaks on the silence,

THE DISMAL MAN. the bushes yield, the heavy dew plashes from the agitated trees, and Ah-kitch-etah stands before the wigwam of his

(For the Parterre.) bride.

“ The sun's eye had a sickly glare, A fiendish smile is on his face, his

The earth with age was wan." body naked and clotted with blood, his

CAMPBELL. hair dishevelled and matted with human gore; from a wound in his arm oozes a JEREMIAH NIGHTSHADE was born in a crimson current; but he heeds it not; a dull, back street in London, just at dayjoy which none but the savage can know break, before the fires were lighted, one beams in his looks; he comes to claim thick, foggy, raw, chilly, damp, drizzly, his bride, and his eagle eye is on the utterly comfortless November morning. savage trophies which are to wreath her The dismal appearance of the world, brow.

when he first popped his head into it,

made such an impression upon him, that “Now," cried she in the ecstasy of he never got the better of it; and as he delight, “Om-pay-too is the wife of the grew up, he still continued to look at soldier; she looks handsome and worthy every thing in a very bad light.

CHAPTER II.

J. R. B. G.

CHAPTER III.

All

History

Gluch

a

as

matters, great and small, presented Jeremiah was somewhat of a literary themselves to his vision through a hazy turn. His library was not extensive and discoloured atmosphere. This earth certainly, but then it was grave and he regarded as a huge store - house of solid. Nothing light or trivial, or sorrows, troubles, trials, and tribulations; amusing, was admitted there : “ Young's and his ideas concerning the next were Night Thoughts,” “ Hervey's Reflecnot by any means of a comfortable tions among the Tombs," “ Dodd's character.

Prison Thoughts," * Drelincourt on Jeremiah Nightshade was never known Death,” (without Dr. Johnson's Ghost to smile. He used to look in the dic- Story), is ,” tionary for the ineaning of “cheerful. works of a similar character, a few ness," and words of a similar import; volumes of shipwrecks and remarkable and as for laughter, he regarded it as a calamities, “Buchan's Domestic Medisingular and most extraordinary natural cine," • Harrison's Diseases of the phenomenon

- a strange affection Human Form,” &c. &c., made up the spasmodic contraction of the facial staple of his light literature; and never muscles — a distressing and dangerous was he more pleasantly or tranquilly convulsion; and he was wont to say, unhappy, than when seated over one of that if people generally were only aware those enlivening volumes on a dull, of the number of their species that had dreary evening, with the rain pattering gone off in laughing hysterics, they monotonously on the almost deserted would be a little more cautious how street, the silence of which remained they gave way to such a senseless and unbroken, except by the hollow knockunaccountable propensity.

ing at, and opening and closing, of an Jeremiah's face was very long, and of occasional door, some shivering a most funereal aspect. He undoubtedly citizen sought shelter for the night in belonged to the very extensive family of his humble domicile. This suited him the “ Croakers,” but yet he was a good exactly, and was what he termed sober deal unlike the vulgar body of that and rational enjoyment. disagreeable brotherhood. He was not Mr. Nightshade lodged in a house morose or splenetic, or ill-natured, but rented by a worthy clock and watchsimply lugubrious, sad, mournful, me- maker of the name of Phillips. This lancholy, and most unduly impressed man was just the antipodes of Nightwith the calamities of existence. He shade. He was not unlike a bottle of was no raven-he desired not to croak ginger pop; his body being somewhat evil tidings in order to make others of the shape of that particular kind of unhappy, but naturally and unconsciously bottle, and his spirits full as light, brisk, infected them with unhappiness, if his and airy, as the pleasant beverage conhumour could be so styled. His horror tained therein. He arose early and of anything like a merriment or jocu. worked late, in order to provide for larity, was much of the same morbid seven matrimonial tokens which his wife character as that of the old gentleman in (an industrious woman as it would Ben Jonson's “ Silent Woman,” whose appear) had presented him with, and he dislike of noise is so excessive, that all sang and whistled all the time he worked. his servants have to answer him by The shadow of care never fell upon him, signs, and creep about the house in felt except indeed when he came in contact shoes. Having nothing on earth to and entered into conversation with Mr. think about or trouble him in reality, he Nightshade. This did him good in was, therefore, troubled at all things. some shape. It had a sedative effect, Property in the funds to the amount of allaying the effervescence of his spirits ; 50001., besides ten shares in that capital it regulated him; for his great fault was speculation, “ The London Cemetery that he did every thing in a hurry, and Company," relieved him from the ne. bis time-pieces, like himself, went rather cessity of struggling against physical too fast. And as might be expected, wants and difficulties; and the conse- Jeremiah and he regarded one another quence was, that he had full time and

as prodigies. They could not at all leisure to nourish and indulge his mental account for each other. malady, which had latterly increased to “What can make poor Mr. Nightsuch an extent, that all in the neigh- shade so unhappy ?” benevolently conbourhood, troubled with an exuberance jectured Phillips whenever the dolorous of spirits, were invariably recommended visage of Jeremiah darkened his doorby their friends to go and take a dose of way. Nightshade.

• What does that man get to laugh

at,” soliloquised Jeremiah a dozen times every tick of the watch in your hands a day, as the hearty laugh of the man of remind you that you are hastening to watches ever and anon startled him in the worms? I should think every stroke the midst of some dismal speculation. of the clocks around you would be a

“ It is awfully thoughtless of him con- warning! Why sir, you are five minutes sidering that he has a wife and seven nearer your grave since I entered this children—and provisions on the rise very shop!" too !" But Phillips was not a man of Jeremiah having just been five minutes thought-he was a man of action. He in the said shop, the truth of his asserdid his best for to-day, and took no heed tion was undeniable. of to-morrow : his faith in being pro- “ Lord Mr. Nightshade, I never vided for was immense. With Jeremiah, think of such things. All I want is to "on the contrary, coming events” in- make and sell as many watches as will variably “cast their shadows before,” provide for my wife and young ones, and most gloomy and sombre shadows God bless them !” they were. He was ever “perplexed “ Really Mr. Phillips you're as happy with fear of change :"-"doubt and and as thoughtless as a child. It is very scruples shook him strongly.” We are unbecoming-very; I will lend you Dretold from high authority that we are all lincourt on Death." made of clay, yet it was really rather “La! Mr. Nightshade,” cried Mrs. puzzling to think how such two very Phillips from the inner shop—"how you different kinds of animals as those, could talk ! You should get a wife and a have been constructed out of any thing parcel of young merry faces round you, like the same materials.

and then you would have no time for A favourite morning employment of such dismal fancies." Jeremiah's, was to gain admission into This was too bad of Mrs. Phillips. the different church-yards of the metro- The mere idea of Jeremiah being the polis, and edify himself by reading the progenitor of “ merry” faces was most inscriptions upon the tombstones. He

preposterous. had been twice apprehended on suspicion of being a resurrectionist on the look

A wife !” groaned Jeremiah, as he out, yet he could not resist the tempta- seated himself in his solitary apartment tion of visiting those congenial spots; and "a wife! What to do? To have a this it was that principally induced him light, gadding, giggling, flirting, fantasto become such an extensive purchaser tical thing, disturbing, and perplexing of shares in the “ London Cemetery my solemn thoughts, day and night! Company,” in order that being a pro- To find myself tied to a shrew—a vixen prietor, he might follow the bent of his —perchance worse ! Children ! noisy humour undisturbed. After impreg- incumbrances, that might grow up nating himself with grave aphorisms and monsters of iniquity, and end their days sepulchral reflections, he would return upon a scaffold! Children that might moping home to dinner, when as he had have a legal and not a natural claim upon to pass through the shop of the whistling, me! Oh! the contingencies of marriage ·singing, care-defying watch-maker, the are fearful!- No, no- no wife, no tenor of his thoughts would be in- wife !" terrupted by some such strain as“ Come lads, life's a whirligig.

How short sighted are mortals—how Round we wbisk

irresistible is the passion of love. Six With a joyous frisk,

weeks after his anti-matrimonial solilo. And till death stops the turn of our twirligig. Merry go down’s the life for me !"

quy, Mr. Nightshade found himself a

married man. “Eh! Mr. Nightshade. Live and laugh- that 's my motto."

The thing came about in this way. A " And a very foolish motto it is, allow widow lady of the name of Starling took me to impress upon you Mr. Phillips-- lodgings next door to Mrs. Phillips. more especially for a man of your years. Mrs. Phillips and her were not long in You cannot in the course of nature patching up a sort of womankind friendexpect to live long! Really you astonish ship or acquaintainship; the visible

I should think the awful reflections manifestation of which, was, that they that your employment must naturally now and then went and drunk tea out of generate, would-”

each other's cups. It so fell out, that “ Awful reflections !"

at one of those hyson or souchong meet“Yes, awful reflections ! Does not ings at the house of Mrs. P., Mr. Night

me.

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