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shade was induced to be present. The illimitable range of tongue ! A woman widow was decked in the habiliments of that preferred Liston and the last new sorrow, appropriate to her bereaved state, farce to “ Blair's Grave;” and actually with a countenance to correspond; and laughed until the tears ran down her Jeremiah thought that he had never cheeks, at a Punchienello exhibition ! before seen a woman of such a grave A woman too, fond of company, and and comely aspect. Moreover, on that blessed with an infinite quantity of eventful evening, the widow happened relatives, many of them of a facetious to have a severe twinge of the tooth-ache, turn, and all of whom came to wish the which imparted to her face, a woe-begone new married couple joy, and crack the expression, that rendered it perfectly jokes, usual on such occasions. Nay, irresistible in the eyes of Mr. Night- more than this; Mrs. Nightshade, shade; and in the course of the evening, though she had never read Mary Wola she sighed and groaned almost as much stonecroft, was a zealous advocate for as he did himself.

“the rights of women,”—that is, she had That night, Jeremiah went to be made up her mind to have her own way very considerably in love. “Ah!” cried in all things; and accordingly, insisted he, as he pulled on his night-cap, “if I upon her husband doing just as she had only such a being to partake my pleased, even to the extent of being gay, sorrows with me!”

merry, and sociable.

She protested Now Mrs. Starling was one of those against being “moped up," and made singular women, that have no objection Jeremiah go along with her to balls, to a second husband; and being apprised plays, concerts, and other places of by Mrs. Phillips, of Jeremiah's 50001. in amusement ; she kept up a running fire the funds, and ten shares in the “Ceme- of parties, and had some of the women tery Company," she consulted the state people of the neighbourhood sipping tea of her heart, and found that she had no and chatting scandal with her five days earthly objections whatever to becoming out of the seven; nay, she actually (my Mrs. Nightshade. Having made up her spirit is exceeding, sorrowful for thee, mind, she next set to work, to study the Jeremiah !) instead of allowing him his peculiarities of her intended victim, and morning stroll among the tombs, took being a shrewd madam, she was not long him a shopping with her! This was too in finding out his weak side.

She saw

much; for of all the impertinences that that the least manifestation of cheerful- a grave, reserved man can be subjected ness disconcerted him amazingly;—that to, that of going “a shopping” (as they a smile made him shuffle on his seat,- call it) with a fantastical woman, is the and that he was as much startled and most grievous and unbearable. alarmed at a laugh, as a shy nervous This unnatural state of things could horse at a vigorous performance on the not last long. It was not to be expected. bag-pipes. Accordingly, in his company, Such a total change of system was sure she was sorrowful exceedingly, and her to be highly prejudicial, and Mr. Nightremarks on matters in general (weather shade's health evidently declined a-pace. inclusive) were almost as dolorous as One day she took it into her head to his own.

Jeremiah felt that he had give a party on an uncommon genteel" found a congenial spirit. “ Ah !” said scale. The company however, was more he to himself, “how happy (he meant numerous than select, and their mirth unhappy) we might be together! was of that hearty, hilarious character,

Things were not long in coming to a which among certain classes, generally climax. One evening, she succeeded in accompanies good cheer and no reckouinveigling him into a tete-a-tete, the ing. A fat cousin of hers—'a devilish result of which was, that he groaned droll fellow," who told marvellous stories, forth a declaration of his passion, and and sang a good comic song, sat next she sobbed and sighed an unreluctant the unfortunate Nightshade.

one of those gentlemen that do not need They were married, and a change any pressing, to make themselves “quite speedily ensued. The lady's gravity at home," and at the end of every joke, vanished into thin air; and language is he kept clapping Jeremiah on the shoulder inadequate, to paint the grief, horror, with the familiarity of an old acquaint. and amazement of the deceived Jeremiah, ance, and inquiring “why the deuce he when he awoke, as from a delusive dream, did not laugh ?” Laugh! Jeremiah and found himself irrevocably fastened was well aware of the danger of such to a decidedly cheerful woman !-a brisk, a course of conduct, but he was of a bustling, vivacious little body, with an complying disposition, and he tried; the

He was

consent.

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unnatural exertion, as might have been settle on the Continent. The present expected, proved too much for him ; a proprietor of the cominercial house at blood-vessel burst in the middle of the Dusseldorf, so far as genealogy can be attempt, and he was immediately carried credited, descends in a direct line from to bed; although he was thought (by the nocturnal assassin of Edward's sons !" those who did not care much about him), It is quite impossible that the marnot to be much worse. In the morning, vellous part of this narrative can be however, when Mrs. Nightshade desired correct; as it is quite impossible that him to get up to breakfast, she received the Tyrrel connected with the murder of no response and on examination, found the young princes in the Tower can that during the night, his gentle spirit ever have kept a shop at Dusseldorf. had evaporated, and that she was once The Sir James Tyrrel who was governor more a disconsolate woman. Of course, of the Tower on the night of the assassin. as might have been looked for, from a ation, was, it is well known, publicly lady of her experience, she conducted executed twenty years after, for being herself in the most approved manner; concerned in the Suffolk, treason. He that is, she first called in the neighbours, confessed the circumstance of the murder and then went into hysterics, which did at his execution ; namely, that he had not, however, prove fatal.

employed Dighton his grcom, and ForThough the end of Mr. Nightshade est know assassin, 'to perpetrate the was sudden, no inquest was held on the deed. body; it being the general opinion, (whatever might be said about the blood vessel) that he had made a very natural

MISCELLANIES. termination; having like many a worthy' fellow beşide, “come by his death, in

EUROPEAN TÁCTIOS. consequence of matrimony." C.

The peculiar characteristics of the French SIR JAMES TYRREL.

soldiery are happily hit off in a work on

the military operations of the war in (For the Parterre).

Germany in 1813:

Napoleon's manoeuvres exbibited all [The following paragraph, copied from his customary scorn of human life. He the Leipsic Gazette, has been, as the everywhere threw his conscripts full into phrase is, going the round of the news

fire. Yet this exposure may have been

from the well-known military maximpapers :)

that with young troops anything is better THE DESCENDANTS OF THE MURDERER OF

than to stand still,

And, of all troops, "When Theodore Hildebrand painted his the French require this tactique the

most. picture, · The Sons of Edward, which

They will for ever move from is at this moment the ornament of the morning, till night in the face of the Berlin exhibition, he deemed it neces

enemy, run under or over batteries; but sary, in order to be correct in the details

stand still they cannot. The famous

Lord Stair said, that the British were of his work, to cover his model with the silk tissue which the eldest prince wears

the only troops he ever saw who could in the picture. Hildebrand selected

go into fire, and out of fire, at the sound

of the drum! The latter point was and ordered that tissue in a shop of the perfection, and it still remains with Dusseldorf, known by the name of 'Tyr; the British. rel. The vendor was surprised, and fire in higher style than the French.

But no troops can go into inquired why the painter was so par. Their advance is proverbially one of the ticular about the article. When the explanation he demanded was afforded

finest things imaginable." him, and he was told of the historical subject which Hildebrand had chosen, he seemed much perplexed in presence A teacher, one day, endeavouring to of the buyer, and declared that it was make a pupil understand the nature and most extraordinary that he (Tyrrel) application of a passive verb, said—“A should be selected to supply the tissue. passive verb is expressive of the nature The motive of his astonishment was soon of receiving an action, as, Peter is beaten. accounted for; the murderer who, by Now, what did Peter do ?” The boy, command of Richard the Third, put the pausing a moment, with the gravest princes to death in the Tower of London, countenance imaginable, replied—"Well, was compelled to leave England and I don't know, without he hollered."

EDWARD V.

ACTIVE AND PASSIVE VERBS.

LONDON: Published by Efingham Wilson, Junior, 16, King William Street, London Bridge, Where communications for the Editor (post paid) will be received.

(Printed by Manning and Smithsou, Ivy Lanc.)

OF FICTION, POETRY, HISTORY, AND GENERAL LITERATURE.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][merged small]

SECOND.

my own?

KATRINA SCHUYLER. thou matchless treasure, to this, my

native London. Did I not bestow my A SKETCH OF THE TIMES OF CHARLES THE fortune on thee, as if thou hadst been

Have I not ever watched

over thee, with unselfish affection, marked He loves thee not, Kate.”

thy opening beauties as the budding of a “He has sworn it,"

rose, admired, cherished, loved thee ; “And therefore thou believest him?" and now, that time and duty require me « Anna !”

to speak, come I not, to thee, Kate, as “Nay, dearest,” said Anna, smiling, tenderly as if it were some exquisite though with tears in her eyes, passing nerve of my own, that shrunk from these her arm round the neck of her youthful painful words ? Answer me, thou and most lovely companion, and drawing naughty girl, with thy wet lashes and her head to her bosom, “there be men flushed cheek; and, after all, what have I who will wear out all the oaths of earth said, but only ihat thou shouldest be to such as thou, and yet—"

cautious lest this youth--this Morton—" “ My noble Dudley !” murmured “Anna," replied the child, for Kate Kate, as she hid her moistened eyes on was but sixteen, “I feel that I am the breast of her friend.

ungrateful. I ought to receive thy “ Nay, Kate-nay-these tears distress slightest intimation as a law, and dismiss Thou knowest, my own beloved, · Dudley Morton for ever.

Were it anyhow infinitely I cherish thy interests thing but only Dudley--were it any plan above even my own. Do I not, Kate? of life-were it wealth, jewels, rank, the Have I not ever been to thee an elder pleasures of travel-anything-anything, sister, or rather a mother? When thou but Dudley Morton, I would abandon wast left alone in Amsterdam, a child, all dream of it for ever, for my love of motherless, fatherless, without brother, thee. But," without friend, did I not bring thee, “Ay, ay,” replied Anna, with a grave

me.

smile, “thou art even like the rest of educate, only the tender authority of them, Kate, ever ready to do ó anything' sisterly persuasion. The sun was setting, -but just what I ask. Thou wilt not and sent back a warm, mild radiance then disiniss this Morton ? "

over earth and sky; the rich masses of No, my friend,” said Kate, with a foliage threw their long, silent shadows dignity more serene and self-possessed upon the turf; the birds were warbling than had ever before been observed in as lightheartedly as if never faithful her; “I know that to thee I owe every- lover had met aught of difficulty or obthing but my very being. All except struction; an old wall, reared ages ago, that, I would yield at thy command. a part of the grounds of a magnificent But should I strive to suspect the inno- adjoining seat, the property of a great cent, because some erring chance has noble, lay soft and rich in the mellow caused thee to suspect him, I should but sunlight, breathing forth from its gorundertake a fruitless and unworthy task, geous drapery of moss, vines and flowers, and be a hypocrite to thee-a traitress a thousand sweet and soothing odours. to him."

Here and there the butterfly came flut6. And thus then, in the bosom of a tering on the zephyr, with his great, girl,” said Anna, musingly, “the smooth golden wings and happy, truant dislocks and artful voice of a gallant, out- position; and the hum of the bee, that weigh a life of sisterly truth and love, epicurean philosopher, ever bent on his and show friendship, that seemed built sweet duty, rose to her half-unconscious on adamant, only raised on sand. But, ear, blended with the softened sound of Kate, in me thou hast a protector, whom a waterfall, and the distant voices of some not even thy own waywardness can move. happy children, pursuing their sports Go on, till sad experience teach thee, to upon the grass. thy cost, that which now thou mightest Poor Kate! she stood motionless as learn for nothing. Wherever and what her preceptress withdrew, her eyes fixed ever thou mayest be, know me for thy on vacancy, her mind lost in tender friend. If there be others more at thoughts and dim apprehensions; her tractive, seek them, Kate, and try them. hands clasped abstractedly under her When thou hast discovered their value- apron, and a single rose upon her bosom, lessness, and wouldst return to those who placed there by that gentle and loved have known thy youth, and who love thy hand, whose lightest touch was heaven happiness and virtue better even than to her trusting heart. As she stood, thyself, I shall welcome thee with open abandoned to the new ideas which came hand and warm heart, and furnish that rolling through her mind, she scarce counsel which now thou wilt not receive, knew whether most to yield to regret As a matron, however, who knows more for the unaccountable dislike of Anna of mankind than ever entered into thy against her lover, or to indignation, that girlish imagination, let me, ere I leave one so noble and dear should be exposed this subject, once more whisper a fare. to suspicions so unfounded and absurd. well admonition. May it strike thy yet Even while she lingered in the same unsoiled heart with the force of truth, attitude, a slight noise broke in upon and the solemnity of parental love and her reflections, and a youth of apparently wisdom. Kate, beware of Dudley Mor- three or four and twenty, extremely ton! I have watched him, his occu- handsome and graceful in face, form and pations, his mind, his companions. He

manner, sprang down from the hall, is light, false, selfish, artful, and base. and, in another instant, knelt at her Whatever he may once have been, he is feet. now corrupted; and I have reasons to “ Katrine, my bird of love,” he exbelieve him other than he seems. Dudley claimed, “my queen of beauty, my very Morton is a villain, Kate. Mark me, I angel of light" warn thee.”

* Dearest dearest Dudley! what With a stern look, and a threatening opportune spirit hath sent thee at this motion of the finger, the stately admoni- moment? Welcome! Oh, ever, ever tress slowly disappeared.

welcome !" It was a sunshiny afternoon in June. “ Knew I not as much, Kate, Dudley They had stood in a little garden ad. Morton would no more visit his woodjoining the comfortable mansion of the land dove. In some rude war he would gentle lady, who, while in reality, she push his fortune, and leave his useless performed all the assiduous duties of a form on the battle field.” mother, still usurped over the innocent “ Battle field, Dudley? Why, what creature whom she had undertaken to hath thy peaceful and silent art to do

66

with battles, unless thou go to paint Kate made no reply, but turned away them ?”

her face. She was too generous to “ True, my timid fawn, most true. expose, even to her lover, what she con. The painter's pencil would ill become ceived the amiable suspicions of her the field of Mars; but, nathless, my friend." Kate, in these times must all men " A malison on her! I never fancied be {prepared, high and low, prince and her. Art thou not then in all things peasant, crop-ear and cavalier, to do thy own mistress?" battle for the right.”

Surely I am. Except the obedience Speak not of battles, my own, my that my gratitude and love to her” best, my noblest,” said the fond girl, -“But (interrupted the youth), I know gazing on his graceful form and features. her better than thou. She has a design

“ And wouldst thou love me less, touching thee, which thou dost little Kate, had fate made me a soldier ?" suspect. My life upon it! she hath demanded the youth, caressing his beau- dissuaded thee from thy attachment to tiful and trusting companion.

me.” Yes,” she replied, “ had fate made Again his companion was silent. thee any other than thou art. And, in “ Out on her! I hate her, and will truth, Dudley, sometimes I do start and one day expose to thee that concerning tremble to mark in thee a manner not her which shall make thee hate her too!" thy own, and words not befitting thy Dudley !" humble station."

“ Nay, I swear it !" “ Why, thou impudent angel, what I love my Anna !" ails thee? What hath frightened thy “So do not I; and so shalt not thou, timid heart? thou tremblest; thou art when hereafter, I shall have told thee pale; thine eyes fill with tears! what, all. But, at present, mark what I say. Kate, my treasure, my gem, my sweet, I know, Kate, that thou lovest me sweet dove_"

utterly." And he passed his arm round her " And if I do!” waist, and drew her forehead, and then “ And if thou dost, my own,-No!" her half-reluctant mouth to his lips. cried the youth, abruptly, and in a

“I would not have thee, Dudley, totally changed tone and manner, as if think me a foolish girl for these caprices with a sudden shoot of pain. “ By the Something has occurred to distress me. heaven that made me ! -never-neverSomething respecting thee.”

The startled girl almost shrieked as “ Me, dear cherub?" and the gentle the flash of his withering eye fell upon youth again pressed her to his bosom, her innocent face, and yet more innocent and kissed off the glittering drops from heart. her soft lids.

“ What ails thee, Dudley ? what “ Dost thou really love me, Dudley ?" terrible fis is on thee?" “ Look I like a deceiver, Kate ?" A slight noise in the adjoining garden,

Yes, thou dost, even as deceivers are as of a hasty footstep, seemed to recall painted Beautiful and winning, with the youth to calmness. thy silken and wavy hair, thy smooth · Forgive me, Kate, my blessed, large brow, thine eyes of light, thy guardian angel,” he said; “I inherit cheek so round and pure, thy dazzling this nervous malady from my father. teeth, and still more dazzling smile, thy It has gone, dearest. Think of it no voice that leads me where thou wilt. more." Yes, Dudley thou art very like a “What wast thou saying when this deceiver."

pain seized thee ?" “ Kate,” said Dudley, “ I have some

“ That we need a friend, a messenger, what to say to thee. In carrying on an aid, an adviser.

Am I not right, my our sweet attachment, we need a friend." lovely wife ?” “ A friend, dear Dudley ?”

“If I am to be thy wife, that which Ay, for in fond love to me, thou thou deemest best, must be best, and hast no confidant."

what opinion can I have against thine ?" My sister, Anna”

“ And wilt thou be that true and “ Nay, she likes me not. I see it in faithful wife to me, Kate? Remember, her cold air and lofty bearing. Perhaps in marrying me, thou marryest penury, she deems the obscure painter too lowly privation, obscurity and gloom. I have a companion for her lovely Kate. no friends, no rank, no wealth. Thou What! no reply? Behold now, how must yield this fair abode and all thy I read the truth in thy artless eyes." careless joy, to be the wife of a beggar,

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