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arms.

“Spare him!” cried Katrine, “he is should he be visible. Oberon's wild unworthy of thy noble hand. Stain not conceit of making Titania feel his the day of our union with the blood even power, by showing how monstrous a of a villain.”

creature he has made her love, is a “Take thy life, Englishman. I would pleasant trick of fairy land, which behave given it unasked. Thee and thy comes gross and disagreeably ludicrous base master we despise alike. Back with when placed palpably before an audience. thee to the corrupt court of England, Think of the low comedian of a theatre and tell the royal despot, that our fair reeling in Titania's bower, with a bad land is peopled with women who despise copy of an asses head on, and the queen tyrants, and men who can punish them. of the fairies addressing him after this May heaven one day grant that the fashion, suiting, at the same time, the chains which thou and thy compeers action to the word : have now laid on us, as a people, be

“Sleep thou, and I will wind the in my spurned from our independent country, even as I spurn thee from the side of Fairies, begone, and be all ways away. this lovely and beloved girl.”

So doth the woodbine the sweet honeyHe touched lightly, with his foot, the

suckle breast of his fallen foe, who replied by Gently entwist; the female ivy so gnashing his teeth and wiping the drops Enærings the barky fingers of the elm. of sweat from his lip and forehead.

O how I love thee! how I dote on thee! In a few days the three armed vessels sought again the mother isle, and the Suppose this, and suppose a pit full half-reformed cavalier doubtless found of good, business, common sense sort of means, in love and wine, to forget the people, gazing at the spectacle, and then merited lesson of KATRINA SCHUYLER. say what you suppose nine tenths of THEODORE S. FAY. them secretly think of Shakspeare.

And then Ariel—the delicate Ariel

of the enchanted island. The comFRAGMENTARY CRITICISMS. monly selected and favourite repre

sentatives of “the brave spirit” are (For the Parterre.)

plump, comely, young damsels, with
melodious voices, neat ancles, and un-
impeachable legs; but who speak the
words of Shakspeare, and promise

Prospero
THE TEMPEST-MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S
DREAM.

To swim, to dive into the fire, to ride

On the curl'd clouds," Why will managers insist on bringing with about as much animation as they such fancies as “ The Tempest,” or would ask a lady or gentleman to take “ Midsummer Night's Dream,” things " another cup of tea. The songs too: of “ imagination all compact” upon the You will hear people who are called stage? If they were not so many Bottoms musicians, because they understand the they would never think of it for a gamut and play upon an instrument, moment. Shakspeare could never have but who have about as much real, esintended it. The singular propriety and sential music in them as a dis-organized delicacy shown in the title of the latter, barrel-organ, and about as fine and coris almost evidence that he could not.

rect an appreciation of the fitness of “A Midsummer's Night's Dream”

-a things as a Frenchman has of Shaksvery dream—a phantasy-a thing of peare, prate about how admirably Mrs. fancy and imagination, not of action

“got through” the Songs and passion; and yet managers occa- in Ariel; how “ splendid” her “exectusionally persist (to use their own abom- tion” was, and heaven knows what vile, inable phraseology), "getting it up," with “ appropriate scenery, machinery, • The best Ariel it was ever the writer's for dresses, and decorations." Appropriate re- tune to witness, was at the Park Theatre, in presentatives and garments for Cobweb, New York. It was Mrs. Austin, formerly of Mustard-seed, Moth, and Pea-blossom? Drury Lane ; and who, it is said, is again about

or Miss

to re-appear in London. Her performance of Nor are the mortals of the poem fit for the part was, like Horn's Casper, a fine ex. the boards. Bottom, with the asses ception to the general mass of what we may

calt vocalist acting, and her manner of giving head on, should never be placed before

the songs most chaste and delicious. It almost the bodily eye; to the mind's eye alone reconciled us to the performance of the play.

NO II.

“ to fly,

*

the songs

technical, unseemly jargon besides, calls, cuffs, damasks, velvets, tassels, Why Ariel's Songs should be breathed- golden cloth, silver-tissue, precious murmured; but as for “execution,” the stones, stars, flowers, birds, beasts, mere idea of the dream-like Ariel strain- fishes, crisped locks, wigs, painted ing his throat to effect a parcel of musi- faces, bodkins, setting sticks, cork, cal difficulties, is bideous. Even in whalebone, sweet odours, and whatspeaking, Ariel, in common with other ever else Africa, Asia, and America fantastic creatures of the elements, should can produce ; Aaying their faces to keep in the back-ground, as far removed produce the fresher complexion of a from the audience as possible, hovering new skin, and using more time in about the out-skirts of the scene; and dressing than Cæsar took in mar

-“Come unto the Yellow shalling his army-but that, like cunSands," “ Full Fathom five thy Father ninį falconers, they wish to spread lies," and " Where the Bee sucks," false lures to catch unwary larks, and should issue from the coral caves, float lead, by their gaudy baits and mereround the jutting rocks, or steal from tritious charms, the minds of inexthe wild greenwood, and by “distance perienced youth into the traps of love ? made more sweet,” fall lowly, gently, yet

BURTON. wildly on the ear. In place of this, we have a full grown woman of harmonious This is somewþat of a lengthy interyet substantial proportions, stationed rogation for the daughters of Eve to reply right in the glare of the foot-lamps; and, to, but still “why do women array with orchestral accompaniments, telling themselves,” &c. Ay, why indeed, exyou, as if she expected to be believed. cept for the above mentioned purpose. “Where the bee sucks, there suck I:

Only to think of the manifold snares, “In a cowslip's bell I lie;

dangers, traps, and temptations we inex “Where I couch when owls do cry.

perienced youths are exposed to! How "On the bat's back I do flv,

is the most cautious and circumspect “After summer, merrily.”

man on earth to fight his way through

this multitudinous conglomeration of Now, this is ill-using the imagination devices ? If he successfully resist the -over-taxing it. Then the managers, "pendants, bracelets, ear-rings, chains," by way of improvement, have lately &c., then ten to one but he falls a victim thought proper to conclude the Tempest, to the “ribbands, feathers, fans, furs, or by hoisting Ariel up to the ceiling in an

laces,” and heaven only knows what else old-fashioned chair, surrounded by a few beside; for the machinations and reill-painted canvass clouds; impudently sources of female society have become asserting as he goes “ On a bat's back I much more complex since the time of do fly," whilst a goodly assemblage of Burton : and thus it is, that despite all little girls, arrayed in garments of divers the quips, and jeers, and sneers, and colours, stand ranged on either side of jokes, and witticisms about matrimony; the stage, shouting in full chorus, at the the world still goes steadily and legiti. top of their voices,

mately on, and statistical tables show “Merrily, merrily, shall we live now, what they denominate a progressive “Under the blossom that hangs on the increase. What an ingenious creature bough!”

is a woman ! A man now (we speak And then the “hurly-burly" being done, little more dressing than a horse.

not of exquisites or puppies) takes very

He the audience clap their hands, the bell has only to put on a few plain linen and rings, the curtain comes down, and woollen garments, brush' his hair, and tie. verily there is an end (until one re

on his handkerchief, and he is done-uncovers the shock) of Shakspeare's En

susceptible of further improvement, and chanted Island.

for any personal impression he desires to make, he must trust to fortune, and the

features and whiskers nature has given “ Why do women array themselves in him. But a woman !-it is not in the

such fantastical dresses and quaint unsophisticated mind of man to conceive devices; with gold, with silver, with the innumerable adornments she can coronets, with pendants, bracelets, ear- bring into play, to dazzle bis senses, conrings, chains, guales, rings, pins, span- found his judgment, and lead him into gles, embroideries, shadows, rebatoes, precipitous and not to be retracted declaversi-colour ribbands, feathers, fans, rations. The only wonder, considering masks, furs, laces, tiffanies, ruffs, falls, the number of people who use tobacco

DRESS.

too.

leaves :

А

NOBLE SENTIMENT.

and snuff, is, why the pretty creatures To quit thee for the dead. generally should give theinselves such an

Lo! nature's self, infinity of trouble. But so it is. They Great nature, deigns to dwell here, have made up their minds to have nur- more august series—a whim you cannot put them off; Than ermined princes, and more liberal and, indeed, after our old author's enumeration of their formidable and multi- Spring's golden horn the fioral tapestry farious implements of warfare, men may strews as well submit at once with a good grace, The canopy, gay summer's sparkling and no longer marvel at Benedict's de spairing exclamation—"Shall I never The music, such as autumn loves, when look on a bachelor of threescore again!” first

The readbreast's lay, linked with the “ Life's fitful fever."

solemn gust,

Floats up from the bare cornfields; and What a volume of suggestive thought,

those steril and profound truth, and beauty of de- Unceremonious visits from the sire scription is comprised in those three words. All the alternations of hope,

Of storms and darkness, as he rudely fear, joy, sorrow, success and disappoint; His rugged form down on the chamber'd

Alings ment that agitate us though “life's fever"

drift, are finely signified in that small word Do, at least, banish each profaner foot “ fitful.”_"Life's fitful fever.”

That might molest these melancholy

halls :

While the high sun, who in the castle's “Were there nor heaven nor hell, pride “I should be honest. I have long servd Might scarce appear, for the red umvirtue,

bered stains “And ne'er ta'en wages of her.”

Of painted lattice, or, admitted, fell

WEBSTER. Unwelcome on the dainty broiderwork The good taste, however, of putting Abhorred his salutation, enters now,

Of tapestry or damask, whose fine tints this into the person's own mouth,

Proclaimed a gallant guest, munificent, somewhat questionable. It should be been said of him (Antonio) and rot by Engrafting life, and colour, and

perfuine, him.

C.
From parapet to pavement.

Noble pile!

Illuminated by the past, secure
CRAIG MILLAR CASTLE.

From the disastrous future, story hangs
Like a rich arras over thee, all emblazed
With high antiquity and old romance,

Sheltering thy desolation! and since, (For the Parterre.)

first

Abandoned of thy princes, thou didst On yonder hill, high in the sunset fling, heaven,

As in despair, the turrets from thy brow, A palace stands, a roofless palace ! Pale (So frantic widows pluck their head In this autumnal glory, its huge walls, Its chimneys, its broad towers, and gable And dash out thy bright panes, and to spires,

the wind Glare haggardly above the hoary gold Lay thy tall porches naked-Sanctity, That tarnisheth its solitary wood, Ruin's sworn sister, haunts tby shadowy Making death gorgeous! 'Tis the ske- towers, leton

While man, bold, thoughtless man, who, That once was fair Craig Millar. Proud to thy feasts

Still brought his hard heart, making thy Disdainful of compassion, it demands

saloons Naught less than veneration. Rever. Ring with lascivious jest and wanton ently

song, Approach it, stranger ; but O! conjure Or the hushed echoes, breathless with

the hiss The ghosts of feudal chronicles ! - Of treasonable whisper-if he comes enough

Now to thy pensive solitudes—he comes Of living majesty is harboured here With step subdued, and reverential air,

BY HORACE GUILFORD.

gear off ),

its port;

nct

OF GORDON.

That sadness of the brow, which, to the clothes ?' she asked; he replied “Yes.' breast,

So the poor woman returned to her Proves ever the most wholesome medi- house, and with her assembled friends ciner.

performed the lamentation and other Esk Bank, October 9, 1836. ceremonies usual on the occasion of a

death. Not many days after this her NOTES OF A READER, son arrived, and she asked him what he

could mean by causing a letter to be MANNERS AND CUSTOMS OF THE EGYPTIANS. written stating that he was dead. He

The metropolis occupies a space explained the contents of the letter, and equal to about three square miles; and she went to the schoolmaster and begged its population is about two hundred and him to inform her why he had told her forty thousand.

It is surrounded by a to shriek and to tear her clothes, since wall, the gates of which are shut at night, the letter was to inform her that her son and is commanded by a large citadel, was well, and he was now arrived at situated at an angle of the town, near a home. Not at all abashed, he said, point of the mountain. The streets are God knows futurity! How could I unpaved; and most of them are narrow know that your son would arrive in and irregular : they might more properly, safety? It was better that you should be called lanes.”

think him dead than be led to expect to This description is applicable to most see him, and perhaps, be disappointed.' Oriental" cities ; but there is one pecu. Some persons who were sitting with him liarity of Cairo that deserves to be praised his wisdom, exclaiming, Truly, noticed, its freedom from the destructive our new teacher is, a man of unusual fires so common in the East: - The judgment !' and, for a little while, he scarcity of timber in the part of Egypt found that he had raised' his reputation where the capital is, erected; restricts its by this blunder.”. use in building; there are no frame or shingle houses ; wood is only used in ANECDOTE OF ALEXANDER SECOND DUKE flooring The wood most commonly employed is the palm, the planks of At a time, not very remote, when the which do not burn readily, and, for the Duke of Gordon and all the lords of that most part, carbonize without flame. family were Roman Catholics, a ProDuring the second revolt of Cairo, Kleber testant not unknown to his grace, rented poured upon the city a storm of shells a small farm under him, near Huntley and red-hot balls, the hundreth part of Castle, and from some cause had fallen which would have reduced any other behind hand in his payments. A vigilant eastern metropolis to ashes, but which steward, in the duke's absence seized the did very little mischief to the Egyptian farmer's stock for arrears of rent, and capital. On this account the population advertised it by the parish crier to be of Cairo is not liable to the fluctuations rouped or sold by auction, on a fixed so common in the East; fire, the great day. The duke happily returned in the source of those changes, has no influence, interval. His tenant who knew the and the vacancies occasioned by plague road, made the best of his way to him. are soon supplied from the neighbouring “ What is the matter, Donald,” said the villages.

duke, as he saw him enter melancholy. Mr. Lane tells an amusing anecdote Donald told his sorrowful story in a of a schoolmaster who was unable to concise and natural manner. It touched

the duke's heart, and produced an Being able to recite the whole of the acquittance in form. Staring, as he Koran, he could hear the boys repeat cheerily withdrew, at the pictures and their lessons; to write them, he em- images, he expressed a curiosity to know ployed the head boy in the school, pre- what they were. These," said the tending that his eyes were weak. A duke, with great condescension, “these few days after he had taken upon himself are the saints who intercede with God this office, a poor woman brought a letter for me.” “My lord duke," said Donald, for him to read to her from her son, • would it not be better to apply yourwho had gone on pilgrimage. The self directly to God himsel ?" I went to teacher pretended to read it, but said muckle Sawney Gordon, and to little nothing; and the woman, inferring from Sawney Gordon ; but, an I'd not come his silence that the letter contained bad to your guid Grace's self, I could not ha' news, said to him, Shall I shriek ?' He got my discharge, and baith I and my answered Yes.' • Shall I tear my bairns had been harried.”

read :

LONDON: Published by Effingham Wilson, Junior, 16, King William Street, London Bridge, Where communications for the Editor (post paid) will be received.

(Printed by Manning and Smithson, Ivy Lanc.)

OF FICTION, POETRY, HISTORY, AND GENERAL LITERATURE.

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THE FUGITIVE PIRATE. now,” replied the stranger. “I belonged

to a merchantinan, and came ashore with (For the Parterre.)

others of the crew; but by some accident

I did not get on board in time, and the Joseph BUNTLINE had for many years vessel sailed without me; that is now a been boatswain of a man of war, and fortnight since, and I have not been able having served twenty years, he retired on to meet with a berth since that time." a pension. Not being accustomed to an Well,” said Joe, here's a crown, idle life, he took a public-house near the get yourself some victuals and get home sea shore, and as he had the character at once, it is beginning to rain, and will of a free and hearty fellow, he had plenty probably be a gloomy night.' of customers among the ships' crews, “Home!" echoed the stranger. “ Alas who always took their glass of grog at I have no home.” his house when opportunity offered. “No home ?” said Joe starting back.

One evening he had been invited to be None," added the stranger. present at a wedding party, and was "That's hard indeed. Poor fellow ! I returning home at rather a late hour at can't say I like the looks of you; but night: when, as he passed the corner of however, I will give you a lodging for a lonely street, a tall withered looking the night at all risks; so follow me." figure suddenly started forward and He went forward and the stranger stood before him.

followed, and they shortly arrived at Joe “ Pray help a poor seaman that's cast Buntline's house. It was now a late adrift, and almost perishing for want,” hour, and the few persons who had said the strange man.

remained, were leaving the house. “ Cast adrift and perishing for want," “ Go into that tap-room and sit by the echoed Joe. “How came you to be cast fire,” said Joe to the stranger. He adrift?”

did as he directed : and Joe proceeded to Ah, that's too long a tale to tell you the bar, and received payment from some

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