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of the customers who were departing. the lantern, and light this stranger to
Two seafaring men who stood together, bed."
seemed to take particular notice of the The stranger pressed his hand, and
stranger who had entered with Joe; and would have given utterance to his feel-
one said to the other, “I tell you I am ings; but his voice faltered, a tear of
sure it is him.” “Hush,” said the other, thankfulness stood in his eye, and he
“ say nothing about it here.”

turned off abruptly and followed Richard
Several of these broken expressions in silence.
were overheard by Joe; and observing Joe looked after them, and began to
their attention was occupied by the clear away some of the glasses that laid
stranger, he of course guessed they had on the table. “I can't help thinking
been speaking of him; and he was half of that poor fellow,” ejaculated he," and
inclined to ask them, if they knew any I can't for the soul of me think all is as
thing about him; but however, as there it ought to be. What the deuce could
were several persons around the bar at those two fellows mean by saying they
the time, he forbore to do so.

sure it was him ?--It's very As soon as the house was cleared, and suspicious." the doors fastened for the night, he made His cogitations were disturbed by a a glass of grog and presented it to the smart knocking at the window shutters. stranger, together with some food, and “Who the deuce can that be at this late told him to help himself, and then he hour ?” said Joe. could go to his bed. The stranger re

The knock was repeated. “ Who's turned thanks, but in such a hollow there?” said Joe, sepulchral voice, that Joe lifted up the “ The polico !” replied a voice outside, light and looked in his face, to ascertain

“open." if he was really a living being, or the “ Certainly,” said Joe as he drew spectre of some departed soul. His looks back the bolts. Three of the head were not the most encouraging. A long officer's entered. pale visage, with an unshaven skin, “Well gentlemen,” said Joe, “what dark straggling hair, which being long occasions this visit so late at night? and thick over his forehead, his cheek you are aware that I always close my bones almost protruding through the house at a proper hour ; and that I skin, and his hollow dimmed eye, gave never admit improper persons if I know him almost a spectral appearance.

it.” “ Some of those people appeared to “ We are aware of that," replied the know you,” said Joe as he looked officer, who appeared to be the principal. stedfastly in his face.

“ But it is possible you might receive The stranger started as he echoed, improper characters without being aware "know me!"

of them. Cast your eyes over that “ Yes :—know you,” repeated Joe, paper.” So saying he handed a printed “are you afraid of being known, then ?” placard to Joe, who unfolded it, and

No," replied the stranger, why readshould I be afraid ?"

Fifty Pounds Reward.
"I can't say,' replied Joe. “I think Escaped from the Prison Ship, Ambrose
your appearance was enough to frighten Urban, a notorious piralı, under sentence
thein ; for

you
look
very
like-

of death.

Whoever will give such inforWho !” interrupted the stranger.

mation as will lead to his apprehension, Why you look as if you had been shall receive Fifty Pounds rewardstands stolen from a churchyard; and your 5 feet 10 high, with a scar on the back voice sounds more like the grunting of his neck." of a half-starved bear, than a human “ Ah well!" said Joe. " There has being: but however, as you appear to been no such person here, nor have I any be distressed, and in want, that shall be person of that description lodging in the a sufficient passport to Joe Buntline's house." hospitality; so you shall now retire to Richard having conducted the stranger rest: but mark my words, I shall expect to his bed, returned, at this moment, you to give some account of yourself in and as he placed the lanthorn on the the morning, for I am rather particular table, said, “I have conducted the as to who I receive into my house, as it stranger to the room as you directed." has always been in good repute since I “ A stranger !” said one of the officers. have had it, and I don't wish it to lose · Yes,” said Ben, “a poor half-starved its character ; nor shall it while I am fellow that I found wandering in the able to prevent it. Here Richard, take street ; but he's not the man you want.

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“ We must be assured of that,” said is my duty to take you before the one of the officers, “before we quit your magistrate house, for we have positive information “ Before a magistrate !” exclaimed that he was seen here this very evening." Joe ; “take old Joe Buntline before a

“ That's a great falsehood,” said Joe magistrate! Lord, you mister officer, I angrily, “ who dared utter such a lie?" have sailed under the British flag for

« Come forward," said the officer as thirty years, during which time no comhe turned towards the door. The two plaint was ever made against me for sailors who had noticed the stranger now breach of discipline or neglect of duty. entered. And in reply to the question, I have been in thirteen severe engagesaid they had seen the very man in that ments, and received some severe wounds, house that same night. Further resis- the scars of which will go with me to tance useless; the officers im

I have received a good mediately rushed up stairs to the character from every commander under stranger's room; while one remained whom I have served ; and after all, to below to watch that Joe did not quit the be hauled up before a magistrate as if I place, as they strongly suspected he had was a felon; let me tell you this is hard wilfully concealed the object of their lines." search.

“ Hard lines, no doubt,” rejoined the Richard glanced on the placard, and officer; “but we have a duty to perreading—“a scar on the back of the neck," form, and there is no alterrative." exclaimed

Joe, finding there was no remedy, “ They are right, sir; it is the very flapped his broad hat on his head, and

Oh, I wish I had seen this at went away with the officers. first, I would have gained fifty pounds.' Joe was not long detained, as the How?” said Joe.

magistrate deemed the evidence insuffi. By betraying him into their hands," cient, and taking his good character replied Richard.

into consideration, discharged him at Why you skulking 'long shore lubber ; would you go and bring dis- But Joe Buntline felt himself dis. grace on my house; I say it is impos- graced; he fancied that every one looked sible he can be the pirate; he hasn't the upon himn with scorn; he found he strength of a mouse, and is unable to could not live under the stain which had protect himself, much more to attack been thrown on his character, and he another."

determined to leave England and go to “ He has a scar on the back of his sea again. He therefore made over his neck," muttered Richard.

little inn to his niece (the only relation “Well

, what has that to do with it ?” he had living), and making his way to a said Joe; “ I'm not a police officer, to sea-port at some distance from his own examine and suspect every one I meet- neighbourhood, entered on board a merwhat business is it of mine?”

chant ship bound to Quebec. They had “Fifty pounds reward," muttered been at sea about three weeks, when Richard.

the man on the look-out gave notice of “Out of my sight, you soul-selling a strange sail bearing down upon them. swab,” said Joe; "get to bed, and inind The master took his telescope, and deyour own affairs.

clared it to be a pirate. All was consterThie officers had rushed into the room nation on board; what few arms they where the stranger was supposed to be, had on board, were quickly put in and hastily drew back the curtains of the requisition; and the master swore if she bed; but he had disappeared. The was not too heavy for them, he would stranger had overheard what passed in put the helm a-lee, and run her down. the room beneath : in an instant his The Pirate (for such indeed it was) mind was made up; he threw up the gained fast upon them; every act that window, and finding it within a few feet bravery could suggest was achieved on from the ground, he jumped down, and board ihe merchant vessel. The master escaped. The officers finding themselves and mate were both killed, and the disappointed in securing their prize, marauders rushed on board. Joe used returned below.

his cutlass with dreadful effect, as many “Well, did you find your prize?” gaping wounds would testify, but he was inquired Joe.

unable to stand against unequal num. No," replied the officer ; " and I bers. He received a severe blow, must say that I suspect you have been which brought him to the ground; the cause of his escape ; and therefore it many daggers were upraised, and he

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was about to fall a victim to the pirates' conduct at that moment so wrought rage, when one of the crew, who ap- upon my better feelings, that I vowed I peared to have authority over them, would at any tiine lay down my life to rushed forward, and in a stentorian serve you." voice, called out

" And who the deuce are you?” in“ Hold! I command you !-I whom quired Joe. you have elected captain, claim the pri- “I am Ambrose Urban the pirate, vilege of taking this man as my prisoner. whose head is now worth fifty good His life must be preserved at hazards. English pounds.". Take him to my cabin, and dress his " What !” exclaimed Joe, “have I wound.” Joe was accordingly conveyed been shielding a pirate ! a murderer ! on board the pirate ship, and laid on a from justice.” couch, and fatigue soon lulled him to "No man is guilty until convicted," sleep. The noise and bustle occasioned replied Ambrose. “You saved my life, by the pirates overhauling the treasures and I have now saved yours. Yet though they had taken from the merchant ship, a Pirate and a proscribed felon ; 'tis fit did not allow him much repose. He you know I was once reckoned as good arose from his couch, and feeling suf- a seaman as ever trod the deck of a ficient strength, ascended to the deck. British ship. And I should have been Here all was bustle and merriment. so still; but I had a bitter enemy among The pirates were gambling for the the officers, who seemed as it were born plunder ; cards, dice, and money, were to be my scourge. I vowed revenge ; scattered promiscuously before them. and one night when on shore, I waited Joe turned from the scene with disgust, for my opportunity, waylaid him, and when his eye fell upon the man at the taxed him with his perfidy. He drew helm. He paused and endeavoured to his sword upon me, and treated me recollect himself-he thought he recog. contemptuously. 'Enraged at his con. nised the features, and was determined duct I drew forth a pistol which I had to ascertain if he guessed rightly. He concealed about me, and shot him through advanced slowly towards him, and in a the head. I flew from the kingdom, low voice said, “We have met before—" was taken by pirates at sea, and became

“We have,” replied the helmsman. one of their crew. I was next taken by “Sit down here; the crew are half gone the English, and condemned to die. I with liquor, and are too busy to notice made my escape, and wandered about us." Joe seated himself on a coil of the country hoping to meet with a rope, and looked at the helmsman with chance of getting to sea. I was on the an inquiring gaže.

point of perishing for want, when chance “ You do not appear to recollect me!” threw me in your way" said the pirate. “I am not surprised; At this moment' an unusual bustle for when last we met, I had been three was heard at the forecastle, Ambrose days without food, and had been hunted looked out, and observed two brigs of through the country for many a day, till wa

war to windward. The pirate crew chance threw me in your way; you were completely intoxicated, the brigs stretched forth your charitable hand, gained upon them, and their shot played and saved me from perishing from want.” heavily about the pirate's ship. Ambrose

“ What !” exclaimed Joe. “ Are you stood at the helm and gave orders; a the poor half famished fellow I took into shot struck the binnacle, and shivered it my house. Why how you are altered. to atoms-another moment, a shot struck Who could ever have thought such a Ambrose on the neck, and he fell a headthin spar, as you looked to be, could less corpse at the feet of Joe ; Joe in. change to a stout limbed fellow near six stantly decided what course to take, feet high, and that faint spectral voice He rushed to the spot where the survi. change to one loud enough to vie with vors of the merchant crew were confined, half the boatswains in the navy ?” he forced up the hatches and released

“ It is true," replied the pirate. “And them, and thus reinforced, the panic you will be further convinced when I struck pirates were immediately over tell you that I overheard the conversa- come. Joe hailed the nearest of the tion between yourself and the police king's ships; “ Ceasefiring, and I'll officers. I was guilty of many crimes bring her alongside." He did so, and 't is true: my heart was turned against went aboard the king's ships, and remy fellow men--I hated mankind for lated the whole of his adventure. their ingratitude. But callous as I was “ There,” said he, “is all the rich cargo to every generous feeling, your noble safe aboard the pirate's ship." Joe's joy

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was beyond bounds when he was inform- Take whatever is in thy shop; leave ed that the suspicions which had attached nothing; and lock it up; and to-morrow to him, as having been accessary to the morning go early, and when thou hast escape of Ambrose, had been cleared up, opened the shop, cry out, ‘Alas for my and his pension had been raised in con- property ! then take in thy hands two sequence. The cliffs of old England clods, and beat thyself with them, and once more met his gladdened sight-he cry, 'Alas for the property of others !' got ashore, and went to his old house. and whoever says to thee, “What is, the Here he found a young man in the bar, matter with thee?' do thou answer, and observed a sleeping infant in a cradle. The property of others is lost :

“Shiver my topsail, if I know what pledge that I had, belonging to a to make of all this !” exclaimed he, woman, is lost: if it were my own, I " where's my niece Martha, is she dead?” should not thus lament it:' and this

“ No uncle, no,” exclaimed Martha, will clear up the affair.” The man proas she rushed into his arms, “that babe mised to do as he was desired. He re. is mine, and this is my husband. Your moved every thing from his shop, and house has prospered, and it is with joy I early the next morning he went and resign it into your hands.”

opened it, and began to cry out, · Alas No my good girl," replied Joe, “it for the property of others !' and he took is now all your own, only give me a two clods and beat himself with them, corner to lay my old hulk in harbour for and went about every district of the city, life, and the rest is yours for ever.' rying, 'Alas for the property of others !

Martha and her husband testified their a pledge that I had, belonging to a gratitude for his generosity, and Joe woman, is lost; if it were my own, I cast anchor for life, and in his 80th year should not thus lament it.' The woman he cut his cable, and set sail for those who had given bim the ckoors in pledge regions where eternal happiness is ever heard of this, and discovered that it was the reward of the brave and virtuous. the man whom she had cheated; so she

said to herself, Go and bring an action against him.' She went to his shop,

riding on an ass, to give herself conseNOTES OF A READER. quence, and said to him, ' Man, give me

my property that is in thy possession.' He answered, “It is lost.' Thy tongue be cut out!' she cried : dost thou lose my property? By Allah! I will go to

the Agha, and inform him of it.' (We continue our Extracts from Mr. said he ; and she went, and told her Lane's very interesting Work].

case. The Agha sent for the man; and The following anecdote would not be when he had come, said to his accuser, out of place in the • Thousand and One • What is thy property in his possession ?' Nights :'

She answered, “A ckoors of red Venetian “ A poor man applied one day to the gold.' Woman,' said the Agha, I Agha of the police, and said, “Sir, there have a gold ckoors here; I should like came to me to-day, a woman, and she to shew it thee.' She said, “Shew it said to me,

• Take this ckoors, * and me, Sir, for I shall know my ckoors.' let it remain in your possession for a The Agha then untied a handkerchief, time, and lend me five hundred piastres :' and, taking out of it the ckoors which and I took it from her, Sir, and gave her she had given in pledge, said, “Look.' the five hundred piastres, and she went She looked at it and knew it, and hung away. And when she was gone away, I down her head. The Agha said, · Raise said to myself, “Let me look at this thy head, and say where are the five ckoors;" and I looked at it, and behold, hundred piastres of this man,' She anit was yellow brass : and I slapped my swered, “Sir, they are in my house.' face, and said, “I will go to the Agha, The executioner was sent with her to and relate my story to him; perhaps he her house, but without his sword; and will investigate the affair, and clear it the woman, having gone into the house, up;" for there is none that can help me brought out a purse containing the in this matter but thee.” The Agha money, and went back with him. The said to him, “Hear what I tell thee, man, money was given to the man from whom

it had been obtained, and the executioner An ornament worn on the crown of the

was then ordered to take the woman and head-dress by women.

behead her, which be did.”

MANNERS AND CUSTOMS OF THE

EGYPTIANS.

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In no country is more advantage taken supernaturally endowed, is peculiar to of the facilities afforded to divorce by the Egypt. We extract one popular anecMahommedan law:

dote respecting these wonder-working “ There are many men in this country, saints, which is almost universally bewho, in the course of ten years, have lieved in Cairo :married as many as twenty, thirty, or " The saint above mentioned, as soon more wives; and women not far advanced as he had entered upon his office, walked in age, who have been wives to a dozen through his district; and seeing a man or more men successively. I have heard at a shop with a jar full of boiled beans of men who have been in the habit of before him, from which he was about to marrying a new wife almost every month. serve his customers as usual, took up a A person may do this, though possessed large piece of stone, and with it broke of very little property: he may choose the jar. The bean-seller immediately from among the females of the lower jumped up, seized hold of a palm-stick orders, in the streets of Cairo, a hand- that lay by his side, and gave the saint a some young widow, or divorced woman, severe beating; but the holy man comwho will consent to become his wife for plained not, nor did he utter a cry: as a dowry of about ten shillings: and soon as he was allowed, he walked away. when he divorces her, he need not give When he was gone, the bean-seller began her more than double that sum to main- to try if he could gather up some of the tain her during the period that she is scattered contents of the jar. A portion forbidden to marry again.”

of the jar remained in its place; and on The demoralizing effects of this per. looking into this, he saw a venemous nicious custom may easily be imagined; serpent in it, coiled round, and dead. mutual confidence and respect scarcely. In horror at what he had done, he exist in domestic life ; and, unless there exclaimed, “There is no strength nor be a child to cement the union, no power but in God! I implore forgiveness Egyptian woman can be sure of her of God the Great! What have I done! husband for a single hour :

This man is a saint, and has prevented Often, indeed, if mutual attachment my selling what would have poisoned subsist between her and her master, the

my customers!'

He looked at every situation of a concubine slave is more passenger all that day, in the hope of fortunate than that of a wife; for the seeing again the saint whom he had thus latter may be cast off by her husband in injured, that he might implore his fora moment of anger, by an irrevocable giveness : but he saw him not, for he sentence of divorce, and reduced to a was too much bruised to be able to walk. state of poverty; whereas a man very On the following day, however, with his seldom dismisses a female slave without limbs still swollen from the blows he had providing for her in such a manner that, received, the saint limped through his if she have not been used to luxuries, district, and broke a great jar of milk at she suffers but little, if at all, by the a shop not far from that of the bean-seller, change: this he generally does by eman- and its owner treated him as the beancipating her, giving her a dowry, and seller had done the day before ; but marrying her to a person of honest re- while he was beating him, some persons putation; or by presenting her to a ran up, and stopped his hand, informing friend. I have already mentioned, that a him that the person whom he was thus master cannot sell a slave who has borne punishing was a saint, and relating to him a child : and that she is entitled to him the affair of the serpent that was her freedom on his death. It often hap- found in the jar of beans. . Go and pens that such a slave, immediately after look,' said they, in your jar of milk, the birth of her child, is emancipated, and you will find, at the bottom of it, and becomes her master's wife: when something either poisonous or unclean.' she has become free, she can no longer He looked, and found, in the remains of lawfully supply the place of a wife unless the jar, a dead dog. On the third day, be marry her. Many persons consider the saint, with the help of a staff, hobbled it disgraceful even to sell a female slave painfully up the Durb-el- Ahhmar, and who has been long in their service." saw a servant carrying, upon his head, a

Knowledge, in Egypt, is at a very low supper-tray covered with dishes of meat, ebb; and we are not surprised to learn vegetables, and fruit, for a party who that the Egyptians are even more super- were going to take a repast in the counstitious than the Arabs. The stories of try. He put his staff between the sergins and afrits are common over the vant's legs, and overthrew him, and the East, but the belief in walis, or men contents of the dishes were scattered in

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