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the street. With a mouth full of curses, some other performances of a similar the servant immediately began to give nature, are here termed durb el-mendel, the saint as severe a thrashing as he the magician first asked me for a reedhimself expected to receive from his dis pen and ink, a piece of paper, and a pair appointed master, for this accident; but of scizzors; and having cut off a narrow several persons soon collected around strip of paper, wrote upon it certain him; and one of these bystanders ob- forms of invocation, together with another served a dog eat part of the contents of charm, by which he professes to accomone of these dishes, and, a moment after, plish the object of the experiment. He fall down dead: he instantly seized the did not attempt to conceal these; and, on hand of the servant, and informed him my asking him to give me copies of them, of this circumstance, which proved that he readily consented, and immediately the man whom he had been beating was wrote them for me; explaining to me, at a saint."

the same time, that the object he had in But the saints are far surpassed by the view was accomplished through the inmagicians, to whose exploits we have fuence of the two first words, T'urshoon' rather startling testimony. The follow- and · Turyooshoon,' which, he said, were ing anecdote is related on the authority the names of two genii, his familiar of the late Mr. Salt:

spirits.'” Having had reason to believe that The strip containing the incantation one of his servants was a thief, from the was cut into six pieces, a chafing dish fact of several articles of property having prepared, and a boy about eight years been stolen from his house, he sent for a summoned. A square was drawn on the celebrated Mughrebee magician, with the boy's hand, and into the midst of it a view of intimidating them, and causing little ink was poured, in which as a magic the guilty one (if any of them were mirror the wizard declared that the boy guilty) to confess bis crime.

The ma

would see certain objects. After some gician came, and said that he would figures had appeared in which collusion cause the exact image of the person who was possible, had committed the thefts to appear to

“ He addressed himself to me, and any youth not arrived at the age of asked me if I wished the boy to see any puberty; and desired the master of the person who was absent or dead. I named house to call in any boy whom he might Lord Nelson, of whom the boy had choose. As several boys were then em- evidently never heard, for it was with ployed in a garden adjacent to the house, much difficulty that he pronounced the one of them was called for this purpose. name, after several trials. The magician In the palm of this boy's right hand the desired the boy to say to the Sooltanmagician drew, with a pen, a certain ‘My master salutes thee, and desires thee diagram, in the centre of which he poured to bring Lord Nelson : bring him before a little ink. Into this ink be desired my eyes, that I may see him, speedily.' the boy stedfastly to look. He then The boy then said so, and almost imburned some incense and several bits of mediately added, “A messenger is gone, paper inscribed with charms; and, at the and has returned, and brought a man, same time, called for various objects to dressed in a black suit of European appear in the ink.

The boy declared clothes : the man has lost his left arm.' that he saw all these objects, and, last of He then paused for a moment or two, all, the image of the guilty person : he and, looking more intently, and more described his stature, countenance, and closely, into the ink, said, “No, he has dress, said that he knew him, and directly not lost his left arm, but it is placed to ran down into the garden, and appre- his breast.' This correction made his hended one of the labourers, who, when description more striking than it had brought before the master, immediately been without it; since Lord Nelson confessed that he was the thief.”

generally had his empty sleeve attached Such a story, circumstantially narrated, to the breast of his coat; but it was the naturally made Mr. Lane desirous of right arm that he had lost. Without witnessing a similar performance. No saying that I suspected the boy had made opportunity offered during his first visit a mistake, I asked the magician whether to Egypt; but on his second visit be the objects appeared in the ink as if obtained an interview with the magician, actually before the eyes, or as if in a and witnessed the whole process of his glass, which makes the right appear left. incantation.

He answered, that they appeared as in a “In preparing for the experiment of mirror. This rendered the boy's descripthe magic mirror of ink, which, with tion faultless.”

L'ENVOY.

BY HORACE GUILFORD.

(For the Parterre.)

In the soft calm of twilight's peaceful hour,
When light gales whisper to the folded flower,
When, like a monarch, triumph in his crest,
The sun hath closed the portals of the west,
And nightingales, o'er sleepy lawns, prolong,
In luscious cadences, the empassioned song;
How turns the pensive spirit to survey
Events that vanished with the fading day;
Each chequered thought the various hour inspired;
The tear that southed it, and the mirth that fired.

Thus, beauteous pages! turn our hearts to you,
Thus fondly liugʻring, ere they breathe adieu !
Recall th’'illumined columns that impart
The fire of Genius, and the grace of Art.
Lo! Beauty breathes upon th’enamoured scroll
The wit, the witchery of woman's soul ;
The throbbing love that only woman feels ;
The bitter pang that none but woman heals.
Lords of creation ! lofty spirits! you
Have pour'd upon the page'enchantment too;
And while, with timid step, the fair ones bring
Flowers from the mead, and dewdrops from the spring,
You fearless snatch from art's unfathomed mine,
The nervous image, and the bold design;
While their mild sorrows sigh themselves to rest,
Your sterner themes, the earthquakes of the breast,
Proclaim the griefs that rend the manly heart,
Conflict, convulse, destroy, ere they depart.

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The volume closes! and these lines, the last,
Shut the fair pomp, that glittered as it past ;
But, as the magic mount* in eastern lore,
With caverned vault and talismanic door,
(Eternal roses reddening on its brow,
With all the wealth of wisdom piled below)
Unfolds, each year, its aromatic gates,
And yields its treasures to the crowd that waits,
So Thought shall oft come hither and review
Things dear to Fancy, and to Feeling true,
While Summer bowers and Christmas halls declare
What flowers still blossom in the sweet PARTERRE.

• See the “ Story of Avicene"- Persian Tales.

LONDON: Published by Effingham Wilson, Junior, 16, King William Street, London Bridge.

Where communications for the Editor (post-paid) will be received.

(Printed by Manning and Smithson, Ivy-lane,)

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