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street, and stopped to inquire the cause and the ambitious schemes of the elder, of this assemblage, they answered in low were now buried in the coffin of the vic

tor of Agincourt, the hero of his age. “ It is Madame Catharine de Valois, Henry the fifth, king of England and queen dowager of England, who is going regent of France, son-in-law, and (hy a beyond the sea to escort to the Abbey of decree of the parliament of Paris ) heir Westminster the body of our Lord of Charles the sixth, to the exclusion of Henry, the king-regent; and who will the dauphin, had just breathed his last, at never more return to the realm of France, the castle of Vincennes, aged thirty-six And so the unhappy princess has come years. bither to salute, for the last time, our Exhausted with weeping, Catharine Lord Charles the sixth, our sovereign raised her beautiful head, and passed and master : God help him and us.”- her fingers over her tear-charged eyes. And then they drew near to the hall. Her bosom still swelled with longdrawn door to listen ; and the belated travellers, sighs, like the choaked sobbings of an and those who had strolled by indifferent infant that has fallen into sleep in tears ; to the scene, cast a glance in passing while her mother, catching the expresupon the litter, and upon the illuminated sion of her eyes, kissed her forehead windows which threw a blaze of light with tenderness, and with unconscious upon the front of the hotel.

fingers smoothed the rich tresses of her The moon had now risen, and its pale clustering locks. beams struggled with the flickering rays In spite of all that she had done and of a small lamp of silver suspended by a suffered, there was still a rich fund of gilded chain from the low ceiling of the love stored up in this woman's heart, saloon which looked upon the Seine. On beneath the stormy passions which anthe carpeted dais of an alcove placed in bition had ingrafted there. Althougli a the embrasure of a window, and under queen, a wife, a guilty mother, mocked the massy folds of a velvet curtain richly and deceived in her transient and fickle studded with fleurs-de-lis, reclined two affections, feared by some, despised by ladies in each other's arms, and who ever others, and hated by all; by the engrossand anon exchanged words interrupted ing influence of her passions smothering by sighs and sobs. The double light of in her heart the reproaches of the past, the moon and the lamp added an inde- and the dread of future retribution, and finable expression to the sadness of their defying hatred by her own power of pale faces, softening and blending their hating, she had notwithstanding all features into the shadowed outline of these, treasured up in her woman's youthful and regular beauty, so that the heart for those rare moments, when she spectator might have imagined them both found herself alone and able to indulge of the same age, in the full luxuriance her softest recollections, her love for her of twenty years; and yet they were mo- daughter, which she had cherished into ther and daughter. The one, who sat in an antidote against remorse, and had a chair of delicately sculptured ivory, idealized into the purest fancy of her and leaning upon the balustrade of the guardian angel. window, was the queen-the lovely queen The last adieus of these ladies were of France, Isabelle of Bavaria. The sorrowful and disconsolate. other sobbing bitterly and hanging over “ Mother," said the young widow, the arms of the chair, was the gentle “ when I shall be far away from this Catharine of Valois, her darling daughter, lovely land of France, you will still see

For a long time they remained so this sky strewed with gold, and this without uttering a syllable; the younger great river which seems to groan like the lady, burying her face in her mother's voice of those who weep, and these lofty bosom, with her eyes swimming in tears, and blackened houses, whose roofs, thoughtfully gazed upon the Seine glido rising in sharp points toward the sky, ing between its banks, wbile its dark and I have so often loved to count when I star-gemmed waves were silvered by was a little child in your arms, and you each glancing moon-beam. Sometimes will then think of your poor Catharine she leaned her head on her daughter's who will be weeping far away, for this cheek, and they intermingled their tears will be no longer my sky or my country.” and their sighs, that voice of the heart, “ And I, too, shall weep,” answered the undisguised language of suffering Isabelle, if, indeed, I shall not have souls. To see them thus, who would ceased altogether; for I shall have no have thought that they were two queens! longer, dearest, any sky or country to But the younger's dream of happiness, care for. Your heart was all I prized ;

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for that, or I mistake me, was the only The time will come, when, sorrowful one that loved me ... It was my only and forgotten I shall end in solitude, happiness, and it now leaves me! it is and, perhaps, in imprisonment, the worse than death, my Catharine ; in a remnant of my disgraced existence ; separation we lose, for a long, lingering and then there will be no affectionate time that which we love ; death is pre- hand there to close my eyes, no loving ferable, for we lose what we idolize at heart to give me a regret, or breathe a once, and no longer feel the deprivation.” prayer at my dying pillow; no one will

“ Alas !” rejoined Catharine, “why follow to Saint Denis the coffin of the was I a hero's bride ?

queen of France It is my destiny,” said Isabelle bit- “ Wolf,” screamed a voice which made terly, “ to succeed in nothing but my them both start, “where's Wolf?" hatred !". The young princess had again The speaker was a man of lofty staconcealed her head on her mother's ture, whose sickly, pale, and haggard knees to weep.

features, and hair of almost sijowy white“ It was a dream, mother," she re. ness, were brought into strong relief by peated, “but a sweet one; for I was the reflection of the lamp, which hung happy, beautiful, worshipped as a pledge exactly over his head. He stood erect, of peace, and two nations united in near a small ebony table, thickly covered loving me.

with squares of vellum with illuminated “ Catharine," murmured Isabelle of figures, called cards, one of which he Bavaria, “oh! tell me, must not the twisted in his fingers, while his dull and love of their people be the blessing of a expressionless glance was fixed with a king's life!.. They love not me!” singular gaze upon his velvet hood, which

“ They tell me, mother, that the had fallen at his feet. He wore a rich Tower of London is a chill and dreary dress, of the fashion of that day; but the dwelling—a mourning queen must be gold of the embroidery was faded, and very wretched there!

the black velvet of the collar had worn “ A queen, my child, is always yellow; and an aspect of misery perwretched. I weep not for myself, but vaded the whole person of the old man, for you, my daughter, too young to beneath the golden links of the massy suffer. And yet you will leave behind chain which hung on his breast, and you in a palace of France, a queen and under the gilded ceiling of the hall of a mother still more to be pitied even than state. He seemed to be in a state of you . . . . See you that man,” she con- utter insensibility, except that his lips tinued, pointing with her finger toward were slightly agitated, and he repeated, the extremity of the saloon, but without in gradually feebler tones,

66 Wolf! turning her head .. “ Oh ! he would Wolf !” Isabelle turned her head to hate me cordially now, if God had not, him. one day, deprived him of his reason ... Catharine," said she, “ it is better There, everywhere, I see nothing but to feel one's woes, than to vegetate in enemies ! the duke of Burgundy detests such a condition • . rise, my child, me now; the Duke of Bedford has no and farewell. Adieu ! the only being I occasion for my assistance; the English have ever deeply loved, adieu! What I insult me ; and my son Oh, have made myself I must continue, and heavens! I lose more, you see, than endure to the close of my fate! But, you; the tranquillity and splendour of my poor child, do never curse your my declining years; and, more than all, mother!” I lose you, the only one who has nothing She had risen, and clasped her daughter to reproach against your unhappy mo- to her bosom, and mixed her kisses and ther !"

her tears with the words of parting. Her voice was choaked, and she strug- “ My child,” she added, “it is fitting gled for an instant with her emotions. "that you should take leave of the king of Perhaps she paused for a word of com- France, and at the same time crave a fort, or of hope from her daughter's father's blessing. The blessing of a mouth; but the dreadful truth pressed father of a mother, also, is a sancwith its overwhelming weight upon the tified thing.' young woman's heart, who hid her face

The young woman staggered slowly with her hands and spoke not.

and with difficulty towards the pale“I do not deceive myself,” said Isa- featured man beneath the lamp, and belle, in a grave but steady tone; “the threw herself at his feet; then timidly future approaches stern and threatening and reverently, as if before the statue of to me, and it is already close at hand. a saint, she took one of his hands and

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pressed it between hers, and looking at your heritage? and the greatest, too, for him with eyes full of pity and respect, a whole life without hope is long and she drew him toward her.

wearisome to be borne; and then to go “ Father,

she whispered, “it is alone to die in a country where one is a your daughter, your little Catharine, stranger, and in one day to lose father, who is come to take leave of you for a mother, friends, everything that one long time, and who asks you to bless her loves my child, too, (they have before she goes.'

taken him from me), is the son of EngKing Charles the sixth gazed with land, for there is no mother for a king." wonder at this beautiful creature, attired “ Catharine," said he, " it must be a in deep mourning, and weeping at his great affliction for a daughter of France feet. To judge by the working of his to sit upon the throne of the lilies as features, you would say that he was queen, while she has a brother a dauphin, struggling with memory, and trying to wandering in exile and proscribed !”

a determination upon some Pity! oh, pity! my lord !” cried matter.

the young queen, wringing her hands, “ It is true," said he at length, with a

very cruel— I thought hesitating voice, “ you pray for pardon! your mind would be touched by mise- : The king grants you pardon !". ries, if by nothing else! But look

upon “Gracious heaven !” exclaimed Ca- me now; is the woman in mourning, tharine, “he does not recognize me! who weeps at your feet, indeed a queen ? It is very sad, when fathers forget the Oh, no! it is your poor Catharine, whom names of their own children! My so- you so loved in by-gone days. vereign lord,” repeated she in a louder cognise me now, for you will never see tone, it is your daugher, the queen of me again. I ask my father for one kind England."

word, although it be the last, to console “ Yes," rejoined the king, “ queen of me in my exile. Time flies, and toEngland, and wife of the regent of morrow I go! Oh, now recall your France . . . . for God has laid his finger senses, and preserve some remembrance on my brow, and many long and dark of your child, and bless me before headays have passed since there was no king ven; my father, call back your reason !" in France-and yet I am not dead !” My reason,” murmured Charles the

“Oh, my father !". she cried sixth, slowly;"oh, I take your meanwith so deep and sad an expression that ing now. You want me to tell you a the poor prince started.

“My daugh- very piteous story, a story that will draw ter,” said he; “

yes,

it is my daughter, tears for ages to come, whenever it is the fair and gentle Catharine ; and here told. Listen : there was once a king too? what has happened? for the king who wished to govern, because heaven is always alone .... they know that he had created him king of France, and is unfortunate you must not tell they gave him the poison that kills; but Madame Isabelle that you have been he did not die, because the skill of man here to see your father poor child, cured his body; and he governed with why these mourning weeds? who now is glory and honour!. And after him dead of the royal house of France? is it there rose another king, who, when the your brother, the dauphin Louis? .... time came, wished to govern like his Ah! it was a long time ago, and poison father. They gave him the poison which kills quickly; for you do not know," kills reason, and he did not die bodily; said he, sinking his voice to a whisper, but reason is the lamp of God, and sci. " that Madame Isabelle kept great ence cannot relight it when it is once treasures at Blois, during the troubles extinguished. So misfortune is fallen of the state It is the dauphin upon this realm of France, for this king Jean, then? but it was a long time ago, alone loved his people .... Do you also, since the people told me that he know how this king was called ? The was dead too, and mourning does not Well-Beloved ? No: it was a long time last so long with them as it does in a ago, and a long course of misery wears father's heart Alas! a deal of out the people, and then they look upmisery has fallen upon our house; but ward, and curse. Kings are very much not upon you, at least, my child, for he to be pitied when they are driven to loves you; and it is a fine thing to be crave pardon for their misfortunes, as if the wife of a hero!”

they were crimes. Do you understand me “Good heaven!” she interrupted him, now? There will be two to answer for

do you not see that he is dead, and these things before God.... Rememthat I also have my part in the evil of ber, I do not say that one of them will be

.

Louis of Orleans, for one night they rolled to a queen.

The Seine has some. him in his blood upon the stones of the times rolled bodies down its stream by street Barbette, and God only judges the night, and when the fishermen chance to dead, and it is not for man to accuse at his find one entangled in their nets, they tribunal .... and never say, that the fling it back into the river, because upon other is Madame Isabelle of Bavaria, the drowned man's neck there is infor she is queen of France !".

scribed, Let the king's justice pass !Tremblingly did the young woman Charles the sixth had remained alone listen to these dreadful revelations of for a few minutes, during which he madness, while the queen, her head appeared to be disturbed by the solitude, fallen upon her bosom, stood mute and although it was habitual, of his vast motionless in the shadow caused by the apartments; he appeared to search for overhanging curtains. A long silence some one with his eye; be passed and ensued, then some hurried leaps were re-passed his hands over his forehead, as heard upon the floor, and an over-grown if to collect his ideas.

It came upon black hound rushing against the folds of him at once. The feeble organs of this Catharine's drapery, threw himself be- unhappy prince were always crushed tween the king's feet. The princess and kept down by the pressure of his pushed him gently back, and kept pos: present misery ; he could not at first session of the hand, which, with a slight distinguish it from a dream or a recol. degree of impatience, her sire endea- lection ; he required time to comprevoured to withdraw from her hold; hend, and then by slow reflection to she still wished to address him ; but discriminate the last impression - the looking upon her with an artless expres- most recent image from the crowd that sion of pleasure and confidence, made up remained behind, blended and confused of the smile of an infant that has just in his brain and at length, by the aid recovered a valuable toy, and perhaps of of memory, he succeeded in producing a the feelings of a man who has just blended result of patience and reflection. caught a glimpse of a friend not seen for Each time it was like the labour of a many years, he stopped her words, child's understanding, striving to comsaying—“ My child, it is Wolf!” prehend the purport of the object which

They parted there. Isabelle of Ba- has been just impressed upon its young varia raised her daughter from her lowly imagination. attitude before the king; and, taking He thus at length recognised the her arm, traversed the spacious gallery. woman in mourning who had wept at

Like two phantoms the two queens his feet ; all her words rushed again to appeared in the hall; a loud voice shout- his mind, and he realized the agony of a ing, “ Our lady the queen,” roused up daughter who parts from her father pages, careless and light-haired youths, without carrying with her his last blesswho had fallen asleep close to their ex- ing. Pressing his hand upon his heart, tinguished torches. Catharine trembled to guard that idea there, he darted as she met the gaze of an armed knight, into the gallery; twice he traversed its standing by the door, whose crimson entire length, and twice he missed the scarf and plume waved in the night door ; he hurried about mechanically, breeze. Isabelle understood the tremb- without being guided by the fixed inling, the look, and the slight colour tention of finding the exit into the hall; which rushed to her daughter's cheeks. for the unfortunate prince knew the

“ Sir knight,” demanded she, “who nature of his malady, and while in vague are you?”

anguish he perceived that he was losing “Owen Tudor, of the country of the time and opportunity for his purWales," he answered on his bended pose, he seemed to dread lest another knee; “ and I have the honour of com- impression should chase away that which manding the men-at-arms of our lady, he so anxiously kept in his heart; so, as the queen of England!”

he hurried about, he exclaimed continu“My daughter," said Isabelle, stop. ally_" a blessing for my daughter !” ping, “have you ever heard the story of 6 Wolf !” he shouted. The hound the chevalier Louis de Bois-Bourdon? started up, looked at his master with a he was in his life a loyal soldier and a restless growl, and then bounded upon gallant heart.”

the great staircase, which led in a spiral “ I never did,” murmured Catharine, ascent to the upper floor, whither Charles

“ Listen to me, then, queen of Eng- followed him. The dog stopped at a land; it is said to be a crime for a brave window whence a balcony projected, and but lowly knight to dare to lift his eyes where the king loved to stand in the

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evening to watch his poor people of ever and anon, accesses of reason to feel
France pass by, and listen to their all his wretchedness, but never enough
earnest God bless hims. The sudden to repair or obviate it ; and who al-
sensation of the outward air upon his ways awoke, after an attack of delirium,
face struck him; he drew his hand across with some new calamity to deplore.
his brow, and for an instant forgot the Perhaps he reviewed in spirit the nights
object which brought him there. Lean- of mourning, which, during his reign,
ing upon the edge of the window, he had disturbed the repose of his great
gazed upon the stone fret-work of the city; the two assassinations in the street
palace, the grotesque cornices of the Barbette, the treason of Perinet, the
roofs, the fanciful heads of the water- massacre of the Armagnacs, and the
spouts which hung over the streets, and English in Paris -- for two big tears
whose strange outlines were silvered over trickled down his wasted cheek.
by the bright beams of a cloudless moon. But the night air blew freshly and
At this moment the glare of torches was coldly on his face and through his moist
thrown upon the opposite wall, on which hair. He withdrew slowly, and as if
a crowd of figures was reflected, while regretfully, from the window, and walk-
the two queens came out of the hotel, by ing with hasty steps, he endeavoured to
the great gate, beneath the window remove the chill which made his knees
where Charles the sixth was standing. shake, and his teeth chatter, while his
It was a mournful spectacle--that vacil_ brain was burning with the fever of the
lating and unsteady light with its red mind. He descended the steps of the
blaze, the hurried movements of the stone staircase, and long wandered about
men-at-arms, whose horses reared and in the great gallery, the living shadow of
caracoled among the litters, the pages but a king, in the midst of the deserted
half - awakened, the two women in palace of kings.
mourning, and all this sadly and anx- He felt the cold which chilled him ;
iously in the dead of night. And a he called, and his boarse and broken
little above, as if the presiding genius of voice was repeated by the echoes of the
the picture, the large pale visage of the vaulted roof, as if in mockery : nobody
monarch, ever and anon disclosed as the came. His few attendants gladly shifted
resin torches shed their flickering light, upon one another the charge of adminis-
as if it were enframed in the empty ob- tering to the wants of a monarch who
scurity of the immense window, like a had fallen in evil days.
dark and gloomy portrait of Rembrandt. sad change," murmured the poor prince,

At the moment when the litter moved " that a king of France should die of cold
onward, Catharine cast a glance of long in his own palace, and that of all those
and eternal adieu upon the palace in who eat the bread of his house and table,
which the days of her infancy had glided there should not be found one who be-
carelessly by, amid the crimes and mis- stows a thought upon him."
fortunes of her family; her eyes met
those of her father, strained fixedly upon

MONEY.
her -- there was no madness in his
gaze. She put her hand to her heart; Alas what a thing is Poverty
the king extended his towards her.

Among the fallen on evil days :

"Tis crime, and fear, and infamy,
“ God bless you, my child,” said he, And houseless want; in frozen ways
in a weak and trembling voice, but it Wandering ungarmented; and pain,
was heard; and the litters, and the men-.

And worse than all, that inward stain,

Foul self-contempt, which drowns in sneers at-arms disappeared rapidly in the dis

Youth's starlight smile, and makes its tears tance, and soon the sound of their foot- First like hot gall, iben dry for ever! steps, and then the Aickering blaze of the torches, as they were shaken by the “ Riches are not happiness," say many wind, were lost in silence and darkness. old prosers generally “well-to-do” in

Charles the sixth stopped long at the the world-granted; neither is Poverty great window, like one of the stone directly and absolutely misery! but if she sculptures on the front of the palace. be not, she is near akin--she is the Perhaps in looking upon the serene and “ mother of miseries," and has, in truth, starry sky, he caught a reminiscence of as swarming and illfavoured a progeny, his own fair youth, and his reign, so of all shapes and sizes, as can well be auspiciously commenced-four years of conceived, from full-grown evils down to happiness, then thirty years of misery! small petty annoyances. As it often hapLife must have been a heavy burden for pens, the junior portion of her offspring this hapless prince, to whom there came, are the worst to be endured. They have

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