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not the deadly stings and matured ma. broken; it is to be omitted in family lignancy of the elder evils, but are more celebrations, and roam about invitationfretful, teazing, irritating, and annoying; less at Christmas; it is to have to put and are that set of imps that are perpe- up with equivocal nods and recognitions tually pestering men in middling circum- in the streets—to have your friends look stances, or rather, on the borders or into print-shop windows as you approach, confines thereof, but whom an increas- and suddenly bring their admiration of ing deficiency of, and an increasing the engraver's skill to a period as soon as necessity for, the circulating medium, you have passed by; it is to feel all deis gradually dragging down to that class licate sensibilities, all free generous feelof “despisable vagabonds,” as Cooper's ings, all aspiring thoughts checked and houskeeper calls them--the poor. Be crushed within you by a petty but overnot afraid ye men of millions; I am not bearing necessity; it is to have to suffer about to make any draughts upon your the greatest misfortunes and the most sympathy; I am not about to attempt contemptible vexations; to have family to draw, a-la-Banim, any fearful, loath- affections and social friendships uprooted some, haggard picture of poverty and and destroyed, and to be obliged to be its effects. Such pictures do little good, uncomfortably careful of coats, hats, and and much harm. They have the ten- other habiliments. It is to live “a man dency to sear and render callous the forbid;" or it is to become an exile from feelings, rather than excite pity, or open your native land--a wanderer in foreign the well-springs of divine charity. and unhealthy climes, hunting for the Besides, the superlative is not my line; yellow indispensable, until you are of the positive or comparative is quite high the colour of the metal you are in quest or low enough for one who neither of; until the temper becomes soured, the deals in celestial bliss nor ineffable woe, feelings deadened, the heart indurated, but is content to peddle in the small and the liver in an improper state. How ware of mere troubles and inconveniences.. beautifully has Leyden portrayed his

To want money is to want “honour, own fate and feelings, and those of thoulove, obedience, troops of friends;" it is sands of others, in that pure gem of to want respect and sympathy, and the poetry, the “ Address to an Indian Gold ordinary courtesies of society, besides, Coin” occasionally victuals. The possession or

“For thee-for thee, vile yellow slave! non-possession of it makes the difference I left a heart that loved me true; whether life has to be an enjoyment or

I cross'd the tedions ocean wave,

To roam in climes unkind and new; a task; whether it has to be a walk over

The cold wind of the stranger blew a smooth, verdant lawn, amid fragrant Chill on my wither'd heart-the grave, flowers, and aromatic shrubs, and all Dark and untimely, met my view things that minister pleasure to the

And all for thee! vile yellow slave !" senses; or å wearisome up-hill journey To lack money is to lack a passport or through thorns and briars, and other admission ticket into the pleasant places ungracious impediments. It makes the of God's earth—to much that is glorious difference whether you have to go and wonderful in nature, and nearly all bounding exultingly along like the free, that is rare, and curious, and enchantfull-blooded courser, or wend your way ing, in art; or if you do travel about in wearily and slow like the laden and de- a small way, it is to bave that most miserspised pack-horse.

able, rascally, intrusive, and disagreeable To want money, in a high state of of all companions-economy, yoked to civilization, is to be a kind of slave; it you; to be under a continual restraint is, at least, to be dependent on the whims from his presence; to feel unable to and caprices of others, instead of indulg- give your mind cheerfully and freely up ing in all the pleasant eccentricities or to the scene before you ; and in the conoriginalities to which your temperament templation of a magnificent view, or a may prompt you; it is to have to rise piece of hoar antiquity, to have the soon when you wish to lie late, and go wretch whisper in your ear the probable to bed early in order to be enabled so cost of your pleasurable sensations; to do; it is to have to live in unwhole- it is to have a continual contest carried some and anti-respectable neighbour- on in your sensorium between pleasure hoods, and mix in daily communion and prudence; it is to submit to small with people whose ways are not your inconveniences and petty insults at inns ways; it is to be a drudge, a hack, a ma- for the accommodation of travellers, chine, worked for the profit and advan- where above all places on earth the men tage of others until the springs are of money shine out with the most resplen

dent glory, and the unmonied become have not as yet been sufficiently noticed the most truly insignificant; it is, in fact, by the faculty. It causes a gradual and to have all your enjoyments diminished considerable accumulation of bile, which and annoyances aggravated ; to have lies lurking in the system, until the inci. pleasure almost transmuted into pain, or vilities of friends, or the importunities of at least, to have “such shadow of vexa- creditors, cause it to become completely tion” thrown over it as materially to vitiated or inspissated; after which a change its complexion; and when all is man, especially one predisposed to meover-journey done and expenses paid - lancholy and contemplation, looks at it is to feel a sort of mean remorse as you every thing on earth through a pair of reckon up your past expenditure, and yellow spectacles. The unhappy patient ponder over the most probable remedial becomes saturated, body and mind, with ways and means for the future.

jaundice; he shuns the society of his The two things most difficult of dis- fellow men, buttons his coat up to his covery, next to the passage round the chin, pulls his hat over his eyes, deposits north pole, are talent in a poor man and his hands in the pockets of his smalldulness in a rich one; therefore, to want clothes, and takes extraordinarily long money, is to want wit, humour, elo. walks into the country. But even the quence, in fact capacity of every kind, or, fair face of nature becomes changed; at the best, if they be not altogether the barrenness of his pockets throws a denied, to have such a duty levied upon sterility over the landscape, deducting them-such an oppressive drawback- "the glory from the grass and splendour that the rich man with inferior wares, is from the flower.” The blossoming of able to beat the poor one whenever they the earth is no longer pleasant to his come into competition. For instance, sight, or the music of the merry warblers the most casual observer of men and of the woods delightful to his ear. His manners mast have noticed that in com- “ heart is out of joint,” and all nature pany a joke from a man of 50001. per seems to be filled with unpleasing comannum, elicits more admiration, and pro- parisons between his own state and hers. duces infinitely more hilarity and good He stalks about with lowering brow humour, than ten equally as good from and upturned lip, an unpleasant

discord a man worth 5001. Oh! it is perfectly amid the universal harmony and fitness wonderful, the raciness and point that an of things. At this juncture, let intelli. abundance of temporalities impart to a gence arrive of a heavy legacy left him rather dull saying. Besides, a jest from by some appropriately defunct distant a man in the receipt of a contemptible relative-and lo! the change! It is as income, by some strange fatality changes a dark cloud passing from the sun. its nature, and becomes little better than Monsieur Il Penseroso becomes L'Allesheer impertinence. It is that sort of gro in a twinkling. He draws his hands thing which grave gentlemen and pru- from the extensive vacuum in which dent matrons designate by the word they have been dangling, takes the yellow "unbecoming." Now all this, though spectacles from his eyes, raises the hat visible to the meanest capacity, might from his brow, unbuttons his coat, and puzzle a philosopher; he would be as turns, with a feeling of leisurely enjoy. unable to comprehend it as he would the ment, to welcome the fresh spring breeze. curious sympathy which exists between The song of birds and the odour of flowers sterling wit and superfine cloth, that are again grateful to his senses. The mutually assist and set off each other. rivulet ripples once more pleasantly to Many a quaint conceit and rare piece of his ear, and the cheerful song of the pleasantry has altogether lost its effect lark finds a corresponding echo in his and fallen pointless in consequence of own bosom. He indulges no longer in the speaker's garments not being of that speculations on the vanity and insuffitexture, or possessed of that freshness ciency of things, but hies homeward which is altogether desirable. The moral, cheerful, free, enfranchised, independent. good reader, to be deduced from all this is He orders an approved cookery book,

that you bé not petulant and acrimo- lies a bed and studies it, and marvels, in nious because these things are so, but that, a short time, how melancholy ever gained if endowed with a “money-making dis- a footing in this mighty pleasant world. position,” you assiduously cultivate it, Oh money, money !~ marvellous indeed and then you will not need care whether are the changes thou canst produce. these things are so or not.

Would that I were a Bank Director ! The want of money too, I am inclined

WILLIAM Cox. to think, produces physical changes which

3

DRAMATIC ANACHRONISMS.

“ Wherefore wait the priests,

And suffer Hymen's holy fire to languish?
BY J. FITZGERALD PENNIE.

Nomore, my sister, let the gownmen talk,

And mark out right and wrong.” (For the Parterre.)

" Does not the turtle

When Venus and the coming spring A curious article, of great length, invite, might be written on the glaring ana- Choose out his mate himself ?" chronisms of our dramatic poets. Out of

" Art thou not pleased the thousand and one which might be To see the tyrant beauty kneel before collected, we shall give the following thee, striking specimens.

Unasked, a prize for which like Grecian The scene of “The Queen of Corinth," Helen, a tragic comedy, by Beaumont and The great ones of the earth might Fletcher, is of course laid in Greece, strive." and something of the manners of the The Hamlet of Shakspeare, is allowed ancient Grecians is given in the follow- to be the Amleth of Saxo Grammaticus, ing lines :

the celebrated historian of Denmark. “ MERIONE.- All I remember is only This Amleth was the ninth king of the this, going to Vesta's temple to give the Cimbri, and the birth of Christ is supgoddess my last virgin prayers.'

posed to have taken place just after the But in Act 3, scene 1, we have a reign of Frotho, the twenty-third king most egregious anachronism.

of that portion of Scandinavia. But “ NEANTHES.- A plague on him for a whether this chronology be exactly corfustian dictionary! On my conscience rect or not it matters little, as the Danes this is the Ulyssean traveller that sent were not converted to Christianity till home his image riding upon elephants the tenth century; yet our immortal to the Great Mogul.”

poet gives the following lines to Mar. This Ulyssean traveller was Thomas cellus, one of the characters in his Coryate, who pilgrimized on foot more Hamlet. miles than any person, either before or “ And why such daily cast of brazen after him, has done. He travelled to cannon, the East Indies on foot, and died at And foreign mart for implements of war; Surat in 1617. The work to which the Why such impress of shipwrights whose dramatist alludes, was entitled “ Thomas

sore task Coryate, Traveller for the English Wits, Does not divide the Sunday from the greeting. From the Court of the Great week ?" Mogul, resident at the town of Asmere, “ It faded on the crowing of the cock, in Easterne India. Printed by W. Jag- Some say that ever 'gainst that season gard and Henry Featherston, 1616.” It has in the frontispiece, a representation Wherein our Saviour's birth is celebrated, of the author riding on an elephant. This bird of dawning singeth all night

The era of Rowe's “ Royal Convert," long, was about twenty years after the con- And then they say no spirit dare stir quest of Kent, by Hengist, ages before abroad.” the Saxons were christianized, and when

“Sleeping within mine orchard, they were as utterly ignorant of the My custom always of the afternoon, Greek and Roman Mythology, as they Upon my secure hour thy uncle stole.” were of the inhabitants that dwelt in the That Danish kings planted gardens

Yet Rowe, forgetful of all pro- and orchards and slept in them, at the priety, seems to have wished to make his period of the supposed action of this Anglo-Saxons as learned as himself, by play, no one can believe. It is utterly putting in their mouths the following out of keeping with the manners of those absurd allusions:

Scandinavian savages ; nor is it less br Whate'er the poets dreamt of their absurd to make Hamlet's father an Elysium,

orthodox Roman Catholic, and a deOr what the saints believe of the first scriber of the punishments of purgatory. paradise,

“I am thy father's spirit, When nature was not yet deformed by Doomed for a certain term to walk the winter,

night, But one perpetual beauty crowned the And for the day confined to fast in fires, year,

Till the foul crimes done in my days of Such have we found them still, still, still nature, the same."

Are burnt and purged away.”

comes

moon.

After this comes the wild Pagan

I hate and curse you ! Dane's deep regret for the loss of the Contemn your deilies, spurn at their last rights of the Romish church.

powers, “ Thus was I, sleeping, by a brother's And when I meet your Mahomet gods hand

I'll swinge them, Of life, of crown, of queen at once dis- And with those hearts that serve my patched.

God, demolish Cut off even in the blossoms of my sin,

Your shambles of wild worship.” Unhousell’d, unanointed, and unknell’d.The governor, under the disguise of a

Moor priest, as he is called, says, For so we read the line, written, “un

“ The gods' displeasure is gone out ; be housel'd, disappointed, unaneld;" a line which has hitherto puzzled all Shak. And ere it fall do something to appease

quick, speare's commentators, and which must

them; ever remain unintelligible nonsense, un- You know the sacrifice.less our reading be correct. The housel,

“ Do that the gods command you.” (from the old Saxon word husel), or

Amusia. — Let the gods glut themsacrement, extreme unction, and the

selves with Christian blood, tolling of the knell, being the last rites It will be asked again, and so far folof the ancient church, Hamlet's father,

lowed, represented as a good Catholic, might So far revenged, and with such holy reasonably regret their loss by his sudden,

justice, secret, and violent death.

The passing Your gods of gold shall melt and sink knell was originally the signal for all

before it, who heard it, to pray for the soul of some

Your altars and your temples shake to departing neighbour, and was not rung

nothing !" after death, as the custoin is in the present

How such scholars as Beaumont and day."

Fletcher could be so ignorant of the Beaumont snd Fletcher, in their " Island Princess,” lay the scene in religion of the Mahometans, as to make

them worshippers of images and false India, and make the king, governor; gods, and sacrificers of human victims is and princess, Mahometans. It is well somewhat surprising; but that such was known that the religion of this sect is

the fact, the above quotations clearly strictly of the Unitarian creed, as far as

and

prove, a reference to the play itself respects the Deity.

“ There is one God, will prove it still more forcibly. and Mahomet is his Prophet,” is a

In Shakspeare's Cymbeline, we find sentence eternally in the mouths of his

the following lines : believers. Yet our authors make this

“ She hath been reading late Moorish princess to say,

The tale of Tereus; here the leaf's “ The sun and moon we worship, those turned down are heavenly,

Where Philomel gave up

I have And their bright influencé we believe.” enough.” Amusia.—I looked you should have

“ The chimney said, make me a Christian,

Is south the chamber, and the chimneyI looked you should have wept, and knelt, piece

Chaste Dian bathing : never saw I figures Washed off your rust of ignorance with So likely to report themselves

-the roof o'th' chamber, Pure and repentant from those eyes; With golden cherubims is frettedI looked

Posthumus meets at Rome, in the Ye should have brought me your chief house of his friend Philario, with a god ye worship,

Dutchman, a Frenchman and a Spaniard He that you offer human blood and life to, in the days of Cymbeline, who we find And made a sacrifice of him to memory; in Scene í. Act III. was the nephew of Beat down his altars, ruined his fair Cassibelan. temples.

“ Famous in Cæsar's praises, no whit less

Than in his feats deserving it.”

That the ancient Britons of this period, * En passant, we cannot forget to remark that the introduction of a set of players, at the

had either chimneys, ornamented with court of a wild and firocious king of Den- sculptured mantelpieces of exquisite mark, even anterior to the Christian era, was

workmanship, or ceilings fretted with never equalled for its improbability, by any poet Hebrew cherubirn, or mythological roof an age before or since the days of Shakspeare.

mances written on leaves like a modern

and wept,

waters

But we

book, to be dogeared at pleasure, no one Titian, in a picture of the Presentation in the present day believes.

of Christ to the Jews, introduced Spanish might swell this article by quoting si- pages, and over the shields of the Roinilar absurd anachronisnis from almost man soldiers has placed the Austrian every Dramatic poet in the English lan- eagle. Tintoretto, in a painting on guage; we shall however, give at present, scripture history, has armed the Jewish only two or three other specimens, and soldiers with firelocks and fusees; and the next shall be from Beaumont and Paul Veronese has introduced Switzers, Fletcher's “ Queen of Corinth.”

Levanters, and other modern costumes NEANTHES—“ He looks as like a fellow into Our Lord's Supper. He has so that I have seen accommodate gentlemen offended against good taste and history, with tobacco in our theatres.

in these anachronisms, that his paintings “strokes his beard have been justly called “the beautiful Which now he puts in the posture of a T, masquerades.” To these may be added, The Roman T : your T beard is the the splendid and enchanting creations of fashion,

the pencil of Martin, whose eastern archiAnd two-fold doth express th’enamoured tecture has no more affinity to the Bacourtier,

bylonian, than it has to the Chinese, as As full as your fork-craving traveller." may be clearly perceived from the draw

The idea of tobacco being smoked in ings of the remains of the Casa or palace, the classical theatres of Greece, can only amidst the mounds of ancient Babylon, be matched by the preposterous whim of whose still-existing ruins closely resemsupposing the fashionable English beards ble those of a Norman baronial castle. of our authors' time, worn by the beaus After all, none of these anachronisms of Greece, while the ridicule attempted equal that of the Spanish painter, who to be thrown on the introduction of the in his picture of the sacrifice of Isaac, use of forks into this country, in a play, represents Abraham about to shoot his the scene of which lies in ancient Greece, son on the altar with a horse-pistol, or out-herods Herod. As a parallel to this those of Brughel in his celebrated Adoranonsense, we shall quote two other pas. tion of the Magi, in which the Ethiopian sages from the same drama.

king, dressed in a surplice and boots "and now of late with spurs, brings for a present the He did enquire of Ephesus for his age, golden model of a modern ship! But the church-book being burnt with Dian's temple,

RESULT OF SUPERSTITIOUS TERROR. He lost his aim.”

The following distressing incident oc“ Has he familiarly curred some time ago to a couple of Disliked your yellow starch, or said your ladies, sisters, members of a respectable doublet

family in Norfolk. Was not exactly Frenchified ?"

One night the door of their sleeping Warburton says, yellow starch was in- room opened, and by the sound of light vented by one Turner, a tire-woman, footsteps they were convinced of the enwho afterwards was amongst the miscre- trance of some person into the chamber. ants concerned in the murder of Sir At the same time the curtains at the Thomas Overbury, for which she was foot of their bed were hastily undrawn, hanged at Tyburn, and would die in a and a female figure resembling that of a yellow ruff of her own invention ; which servant who happened to be ill the made yellow starch so odious, that it im. house, appeared, and throwing up her mediately went out of fashion.

arms, with a groan or strange gutIf we go back to the old Romances of tural sound, immediately vanished. Exthe Middle Ages, such as Kyng Alesa- ceedingly alarmed, the ladies sought unde, Richard Ceur de Lion, Amadis de only to shut out from their sight a repeGaul, Troilus and Cressid, The Chroni- tition of the vision by concealing their cle of the Cid, the Geste of Kyng Horn, heads beneath the bed clothes : and so Iwain and Gawin, and a thousand others they lay till next morning; when, upon of the Norman-Anglo poets, and the rising, they were shocked to behold celebrated Troubadours, we shall find the lying cold and dead, at the feet of their confusion of chronology, manners, and bed, the unfortunate invalid, who, without customs still more remarkable. But it doubt, finding herself worse in the night, must be acknowledged that the poets had made her way into the ladies' chamhave not erred more glaringly in these ber, and there, unable to ask for the things, than the most celebrated painters medicine, or assistance she required, of a more refined and critical age- expired in the attempt.

LONDON: Published by Effingham Wilson, Junior, 16, King William Street, London Bridge, Where communications for the Editor (post paill) will be received.

(Printed by Manning and Smithsoni, Ivy Lane.)

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