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met at sea.

and attempt to detain her until the brig his chair. '“Ah, well done-well done,”
could come up with her. The captain exclaimed he, “that pirate Abdalec was
consented—the launch was rigged out, a blood-thirsty hound; he ought to have
and twenty staunch seamen jumped on been crammed into one of his powder
board; they soon approached the pirate, casks, and blown to
who, undaunted, shewed them a bold “ Hush, father," interrupted Harriet,
front, in hopes of intimidating them, but "pray don't use those harsh expressions-
the true British hearts that were afloat listen to me while I finish the account.
in the launch were not to be baffled; She then read as follows:-
they brought up close alongside, every Among the pirate crew was a black,
man had his work to do,—they rushed who had received an injury from Abda-
on board the pirate, and so impetuous lec, the pirate chief, and as an opportu-
was their charge, that the murderous nity now offered to revenge himself

, he pirates threw themselves overboard, and did not let it pass, he therefore informed others rushed down below. The chief the British captain, that in an island not seized a lighted brand, and descending two days' sail from where they then lay, into the hold, was about to place it the pirates deposited all the spoil of which against a barrel of gunpowder, when they robbed the various vessels which Speedwell jumped down after him, and had fallen into their power, and for a seizing the hand which held the torch, stipulated reward, and freedom for himgrappled him tightly by the throat with self

, he would pilot them to the spot. the other. The pirate was a powerful This was agreed upon, and on reaching man, and Speedwell found he had his the island they found jewels and various match_dreadful was their strife—often merchandize, to the amount of some was the lighted torch within an inch of thousands of pounds. The captain of the powder cask—at last both fell ; the the schooner had taken possession of the pirate called to one of his crew, but he island, and had sent Lieutenants Speedwas answered by Hawser, who seeing the well and Hawser with dispatches to Eng. dangerous situation in which they were land, by the Eliza sloop, which he had placed, instantly jumped down, and seiz.

Too much praise cannot be ing the pirate by the throat, held him awarded to the enterprising Lieutenant until Speedwell extinguished the torch. Speedwell, by whose bold exertions The brig by this time had come up, and the lives of the British crew were prein a few minutes took possession of her served, for had the explosion taken place, prize and such of the pirates as remained not only would the pirates' vessel have alive. The treasures which were been blown to atoms, but the British vessel board the pirate's vessel were removed to must also have been destroyed, as she the brig, and the ill-fated lugger soon had reached within a cable's length at swamped and sunk to rise no more. the moment Hawser jumped into the

The three weeks had now nearly hold. It is expected that both Lieupassed, and Harriet's hopes had dimi- tenant Speedwell and Lieutenant Hawser nished. The hated marriage was within will be raised to the ranks of captain.” two days of its completion, when one “ So they ought-so they ought,” exmorning, on entering the breakfast par- claimed the admiral —" a couple of lour, the admiral handed her the news- brave young dogs." paper, and (as was his usual custom) “ Now, father,” said Harriet, looking directed her to read the naval intelli- stedfastly in his face, “ I claim your gence.

She listlessly took up the paper, promise." and glanced over it, when suddenly her “ My promise !—what promise ?” ineye seemed to fix on some intelligence quired he. which raised her hopes to a pitch of de- “Let me repeat your own words,” relight: she hastily conned it over—“Oh, plied she, “listen if within the time Father ! ” she joyously exclaimed, “it stated in the margin, Speedwell should is true—it is true--he will be a captain; convince me of his bravery by achieving -my dear, dear Speedwell.”

some act which may eventually raise him Hey, what the devil's in the wind to the rank of captain'-why then”now?” exclaimed the admiral.

" What then ? " inquired the ad“ Oh such good, such great news,

miral. father; only listen." She then hastily “ You would consent," rejoined Harread an account of the engagement and riet. destruction of the pirates by the Rover “ I didn't say that" schooner.”

“ But you meant it.” The old admiral raised himself up in “ Pshaw-nonsense, how do you know

on

2

what I meant,” growled the admiral ? Sir Everard started, the colour rose in “ haven't I promised Sir Everard ? and his cheek ; the old admiral started with d'ye think I can break my word to a astonishment, and whistled “ Hearts of nobleman!”

Oak,” while he beat time with his Harriet replied, “ I will marry no wooden leg. nobleman-Sir Everard will never be “ Yes,” continued Harriet, “I repeat my husband, and when you know all, it ; your hand is not free to give, because you will oppose the match as much as I another has a prior claim.” do myself."

Sir Everard stammered, and after “What the devil do you mean," in many attempts, at length in broken senquired the admiral, “what do you mean tences inquired of Harriet what she by-when I know all ?”

meant. “ You shall know in good time," re

" I mean

a promise of marriage, plied Harriet; “in the meanwhile let it granted twelve months since to a young be understood, that if the match is lady, named Melmoth. Observe, Sir broken off with Sir Everard, there shall Everard, your own hand writing”—with be no further objection to Speedwell." these words, she drew forth an open let

“Well, well— let it be so, let it be so," ter;—" at the time you made that proexclaimed the admiral ; “serve out the posal, Miss Melmoth was in affluent circoffee and be quiet.”

cumstances; but in consequence of the Breakfast was only half over when the failure of her bankers, has been lately bell sounded. The servant entered and much reduced. This, perhaps, has been said that a young lady, attended by an the cause of your breach of promise." elderly person, was inquiring for Miss “ Madam,” Sir Everard stammeredHarriet. « Oh, shew them into my " Miss Harriet (The admiral chamber,” said Harriet, “ I will attend whistled the “Rogue's March,' accomthem immediately.”

panied as usual by his wooden leg)“Now, who the devil can this young “ Miss Harriet!" continued Sir Everard, lady be ?” exclaimed the admiral. “I would gladly have kept my word

"Patience, dear father,” replied she; with Miss Melmoth, but she put it com“ in a short time you shall know all,” pletely out of my power, as she has left

"Why not now,” growled the admiral, England some months since, and I have you obstinate young hussey.'

never been able to hear any tidings of “ Don't find fault with my obstinacy, her.” father,” replied she ; “it is probable that “ Indeed,” added Harriet, “ then I obstinacy will be as good a friend to me am happy to have it in my power to give as it has been to you. I have been you an opportunity of redeeming your faithful to my dear Speedwell-you may pledge, and preserving your honour." call that obstinacy ; I refused to accept So saying she left the room, but a rich nobleman, and I have obstinately quickly returned, leading in the young persevered until I am now certain of lady. gaining my end-consequently, obstinacy “ Give me leave to introduce Miss has been my best friend.”

Melmoth,” said Harriet, as she passed The conversation was broken off by her to Sir Everard. the appearance of the servant, who an- The admiral looked at all partiesnounced Sir Everard. He entered, and twiddled his stick about, and seemed as taking his seat near Harriet, said he had it were completely out-manæuvred.. A called to remind them that the following pause ensued-a distant hum of voices day was the day appointed for the wed- broke upon their silence the bell rang ding, and that the carriage would be at violently-and soon “ Rule Britannia” the gate by ten o'clock, if they had no was heard in full chorus. objection.

“ What devils' racket is this?” exHarriet rose, and looking seriously at claimed the admiral, Sir Everard, said, “Sir, in marriage going to board us, or run us down ?the hand should be freely given, and the I think this day is full of events. I have heart should freely sanction the choice. lost a son-in-law, and my daughter has In this case as regards us both, the heart lost a husband.” has not been consulted : neither my “ No matter for that, here's another hand nor heart are free to give, because and a better for her,” exclaimed Hawser, my heart has long been another's. as he dashed into the room, followed by Neither is your hand free to give, be- Speedwell. “ My letter promised that cause it has long been promised to we would be on shore before the maranother."

riage took place, if possible, and here

" is the enemy

AND OTHER WRITERS.

DRAMA.

we are in good sailing order, and all Bring the red grape which may steep prepared for action-guns shotted, tom- Reason into slumbers deep ; pions out, and a good supply of ammuni- Bring! oh bring the primrose pale, tion,” so saying, Hawser placed a brace Blasted by the northern gale, of pistols on the table,-at sight of And the lily : wan as now, which, Sir Everard turned aside.

Love hath made my dying brow. “ How now, you scape grace dogs," See thou too, that in the wreath exclaimed the admiral, “d'ye think Cypress lurk each bud beneath. you've got aboard of the pirates again, that you come down into the cabin in this Weep thou not—though in mine eye trim!”

Life's lamp gleameth fitfully; “ Admiral, your pardon," said Speed- Sister, sister! couldst thou see well, “I come not to offend, but to claim What proud glories wait for me! the victor's bright reward.— True it is I Hist! oh hist! that lovely strain have no fortune but my sword, but while

Comes to summon me again. I've strength to raise it in my country's

Sister, on mine early grave, cause, it shall lead me on to fortune.” He will weep, who would not save. “ It shallit will my boy,” exclaimed

ALOISA. the admiral, while his eyes teemed with delight. “ Your hands my brave boys. You have acted nobly,-Speedwell, events

THE ASSUMED PLAGIARISMS have occurred which prevent Sir Ever

OF LORD BYRON, ard marrying my daughter, as you perceive he is already taken in tow by a smart-built frigate. And this by the way, will save you the trouble of shoot

BY THE AUTHOR OF “BRITAIN'S HISTORICAL ing each other-Come hither, Harriet, Your hand-Speedwell yours. ThereHeaven bless you both."-He placed their hands in each other“ To-morrow

(For the Parterre.) the parson shall do his office-Hawser my brave lad, I'm sorry I haven't got Many critics of the present age have another daughter, or you should have exalted Lord Byron to a demigod, while had her with all my heart.--But no

others have degraded him to a heartless matter, we'll dine together, and make a

fiend. Some have declared that his merry party, and then we'll fight our poetry was never equalled, and will never battles o'er again-we'll drink health be surpassed, and a few have been weak and happiness to both the new-married enough to maintain that every ninth man couples, and then success to the Navy of in England might rival his lordship in Old England.

the idle craft of verse- e-making the Edinburgh Reviewers for instance. So

much for the infallibility of criticism, that THE DEATH-CHAPLET!

criticism with which the reading public

are perpetually gulled. (For the Parterre.)

The noble Bard has been frequently

and loudly accused by certain writers, Dost thou hear! my sister fair,

too envious of his faine, of that besetting That most melancholy air,

and crying sin, termed plagiarism. Now its solemn murmurs die

Numerous poetic and bygone stores have With the midnight zephyr's sigh:

been ransacked, and the lines of ancient Summoning my soul away

and modern authors brought forward in From its weary coil of clay!

proof of this accusation : by comparing Weep not dearest, thou dost know many of which with the supposed imita. How my lot is tinged with woe. tions, the charge appears frivolous and

ungrounded ; and in defence of others, it Hasten then my sister fair,

may be urged that men in distant ages Twine for me a chaplet rare :

and countries have given birth to similar But beware that every flower

ideas, when writing or speaking on similar Is a sign of Passion's power !

subjects, without the possibility of copying Gather thou the glowing rose, each other.- We know that imputations That doth Love's sweet hopes enclose; of the same kind were poorly attempted And the deadly dark night-shade, to be cast on the poems of Chatterton, Emblem of them when they fade ! and those of Ossian, when the latter,

M. C.

translated by Macpherson, first made their folly to attempt to be a philosopher at appearance.

court, and a courtier among philosoWe have seen an old poem, little if at phers.” Whether the taunts of both all known in the present day, entitled these great authors were original, or “St. Peter's Lodge, a Serio - Comic whether either of them were borrowed Legendary Tale.”

It is utterly devoid from the other, is not very easy to deof any merit, but its opening lines are

termine; but of this we are certain, very similar to those of Lord Byron's that both have a striking resemblance to parody on Southey's Vision of Judgment, the following lines in “ La Poete Couras the following short extract will prove: tesan,” by Du Bellay, an old French “St. Peter in his easy chair

poet, who died in 1559, though it is Sits dozing, to his lodge repair

more than probable that they were never Souls made immortal : he inspects

seen by Johnson :Their passports, asks their several sects, “ Bref pour estre en cest art des preAnd after some confabulation,

miers de tonage, Shows each where lies his heavenly Sic tu veux finement jouer ton perstation.”

sonage; We do not believe his lordship has

Entre les courtesans du scavant tu ever been accused of borrowing from this

feras,

Et entre les scavans courtesan tu dull tale, and the reason may be, that

seras.” none of his critics with all their invidious research and industry, have yet alighted Homer himself has been accused of on the precious morceau. It is, howe having purloined a great portion, if not ever, possible that his lordship might the whole, of his poetic treasures from have seen it; and, like the alchymist, by the secret recesses of the Egyptian temthe magic of his genius transmuted the ples. But we are not inclined to betime-corroded and valueless metal into lieve, with Ptolemy Hephæstion, that gold.

the two great poems which bear the Be this as it may, we are of opinion name of Homer were written by Phanthat many writers accused, like Byron, tasia, a lady or priestess of Memphis, of purloining some of their brightest who had deposited them in a temple of thoughts, ought not in strict justice to Vulcan in that city, from which the be branded with the degrading stigma Grecian bard stole thèm by the aid of of being a literary thief. “ Every ob- one of the sacred scribes. Nor do we servant man,” it has been said, we forget pay much credit to the report of Dioby whom, must have remarked how dorus Siculus, who has asserted that often the same thoughts, and even the Daphni, a prophetess of Delphi, imsame modes of expression, are used by parted to Homer the principal materials persons who never were acquainted with of both his immortal poems. It is each other. This brings to our recol. however acknowledged in the Iliad and lection Dr. Johnson's celebrated sarcasm

the Odyssey, that the Aoidoi, or bards, on Lord Chesterfield,—" He may be a

often sung of the “ Tale of Troy divine.” wit among lords, but he only a lord

Herodotus says that Hesiod and Hoamong wits;" yet it is a matter of doubt

mer were the first who composed a if this speech be original, for it is known Theogeny among the Greeks, giving to that Voltaire once said to the Italian the Gods their different attributes, titles, Abbé Bettinelli, when he visited him at and honours. We know that all the Ferney, and spoke of Helvetius, who gods of Greece, with the groundwork of had presented his work “De L'Esprit” the fables of her poets, came from Egypt; to some of the royal family—“What and before the priesthood of that country That the poems of Homer, whatever however, on record, of a wonderful simiwas their origin, were primitively in the larity in the productions of different regular, connected, and epic form in authors, who have the advantage of cerwhich they have come down to us, is tain concurrent circumstances as a tesnot to be believed ; for the fact is well timony to prove their innocence of being authenticated, that until they were col- servile copyists. lected, arranged, and united into con-, It is asserted in a life of Shakspeare, sistent narratives by the order, or in the that “two musical pieces by different perage of the Pisistratidæ, they were con- sons, were sent to a musical composer, tinually sung in the different countries who found a song of ten lines the same of Greece in disjointed episodes and verbatim, save three words in each, and mutilated fragments by the Paywdoi, the authors did not know one another, or Rhapsodists, the wandering minstrels nor had ever seen the pieces.” This, by of that classic land. What folly, then, the bye, is bad English, and worse sense have not the critics committed by laying . but a very curious instance of similar down infallible rules for the Epopee, ideas arising in the minds of different drawn from the writings of Homer, and writers. Yet this is not so striking as maintaining those writings (put together what follows respecting Shakspeare and ages before any poetic rules or laws ex

had darkened its early religion, which * We do not mean to imply that the poems was that of the one only and true God, of Rowley are genuine, but that, as the works they were but the innocent symbols of of Chatterton, they are original. Those who

the arts and sciences, the seasons, and are well versed in British antiquities cannot, we should imagine, doubt for a moment of the

the different appearances of the heavens. authenticity of Ossian. His manners and cus- Now, as Homer is believed to have viwill venture to affirm that no one, had these sited and resided long in Egypt, it is been sporious, would have dared to introduce highly probable that he there found a in them the sports of hawking: an amusement great

of the story, and the in the Celtic ages unknown to Europe, except principal characters in his Iliad, which, in the British Isles, where the Romans found it to their astonishment, practised in great per

in honour to his own country, he translated to Greece.

fection.

Brandt the Dutch poet. isted) to be the invariable and eternal

Gerard Brandt was born at Amsterdam standard by which all future epic poems in 1626. He wrote a tragedy, entitled should be judged.

“ The Dessembling Torquatus:" the Virgil has been denounced as the king scene of this piece is laid at Rome, but it of plagiarists! La Harpe accuses him, has not the least adherence to the history, and it must be confessed in numerous manners, customs, or names of the instances, but too justly, of imitating Romans. Upon this play Van Kampen Homer, not only in his plot, or fable, observes, " There is a remarkable resembut also in his battles, machinery, inci- blance in it to Hamlet. Shakspeare dents, and similes. He likewise charges has drawn from an old northern tradition him with having borrowed whole pas- by Saxo Grammaticus. Brandt's idea sages from the elder poets Ennius, seems to be entirely original. Torquatus Accius, Luevius, and Pacuvius; nor did is at Athens, like Hamlet at Wittenberg, even those of his own age escape the pursuing his studies, while his father depredations of this literary plunderer. (Manlius) is murdered at Rome by his

Milton, also, has not escaped the cen- own brother (Noron) who espouses the sure of the critic for boldly gathering widow (Plaucina). Who does not here many flowers planted in the Aonian immediately recognise Claudius, Gergroves by other bards, and twining trude, Hamlet, and the murdered king them with the immortal wreaths that of Shakspeare? Torquatus says too, adorn his own brows. It is certain at the commencement : that he is greatly indebted for his strange Hast thou, O heaven! e'er seen a wretch account of the battle of the angels in

like me? heaven to the war of the Titans against Perfidious, joyless uncle, traitoroủs slave! the gods, in Hesiod. Lauder has ma- How dar'dst thou thus my warlike father liciously pointed out many instances of slay, Milton's imitations in his minor poems. And stain my mother's fame. It has been likewise asserted that he The ghost of Manlius appears to his owes some of his beauties to a refine- son, and incites him to avenge his death. ment on Silvester, and that bombastic Torquatus feigns madness like Hamlet. author Du Bartas, of whom Dryden The object of his affections (Juliana) is says,

also introduced. But the most striking “ Nor, like Du Bartas, bridle up the point of resemblance is in the scene where floods,

the heroes of both tragedies reproach And periwig with snow the bald- their mothers. Noron, being greatly pate woods.

afraid of his nephew, cunningly introThis writer was translated by Silvester, duces his wife (Placina) into a chamber whose bold but barbarous style, and where Torquatus is, after having conwretched taste, could only be equalled cealed one of his councillors under a by that of his original. Warburton has couch, for the purpose of hearing whepointed out “the Cave of Death,” by ther he would openly avow:his suspicions Du Bartas, as the prototype of Milton's to his mother. Torquatus, aware of this, " Il Penseroso."

suddenly despatches him, and reproaches There are some curious instances, his mother for her immodesty, who after

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