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OCCUPATION. 1877. Previously. Total.

1877. Previously. Tolai. Bakers

1... 22... 23 Machinists ....... 8... 105... 113 Barbers...

1... 29... 30 Marble workers.... 0... 5... 5 Basket er. 0... 1... 1 Masons....

4... 74... 78 Bell hanger.

1... 1 Mend'r of china ware 0... 1... 1 Blacksmiths.. 7... 51... 58 Merchants....

0... 3... 3 Bleachers.. 5... 5 Mill hands.

21... 55... 76 Boiler makers. 0... 11... 11 Moulders..

3... 41... 44 Bookkeepers..

3...
15... 18 Musicians..

1... 7... 8 Boot fitters..

0...

2 Music teachers. 0... 2... 2 Box makers..

0... 6...
6 Painters.....

10...

93... 103 Brakemen.. 17... 23 Pedlers

2... 21... 23 Brass workers. 0... 3... 3 Photographers

1... 4... 5 Brokers.... 1... 1... 2 Physicians.

0... 3... 3 Butchers. 0... 16... 16 Plumbers

2 Confectioner.

Clerks.....

1...

0... 1...
1 Preacher...

0...

1... 1 Cabinet makers 1... 12... 13 Printers.

0... 19... 19 Carpenters..

5... 104... 109 Quarrymen... 1... 3... 4 Cigar makers 0... 8... 8 Sailors

2... 37... 39 0... 25... 25 Saloon keepers.

0... 2... Clothes cleaner... 0... 1... 1 Sail makers..

1... 8... Comb maker... 0... 1... 1 School teachers.

2... Cooks....

54... 57 Seamstresses.... 1... 19... 20 Coopers.

0... 6... 6 Servants and waiters 33... 45... 78 Curriers.

0...
5... 5 Ship carpenters.... 0..

6 Cutler... 0... 1... 1 Ship riggers....

0...

3... 3 Draughtsmen... 1... 4...

5 Shoemakers...

2... 69...

71 Dress makers... 9... 23... 32 Silver polishers.. 1... 6... 7 Dyers... 0... 11... 11 Soldier...

0... 1... 1 Engineers. 2... 19... 21 Spinners...

49... 52 Farmers..

5...

50... 55 Steam pipe workers 0... 2... 2 File cutters.

0... 3... 3 Stonecutters.... 1. 12... 13 Firemen

0... 2... 2 Stucco worker..... (... 1... 1 Gardeners.. 1... 12... 13 Tailors...

3... 50... 53 Gas fitters.

0... 11...
11 Tanner..

0... 1...

1 Grocers..

0...
2 Teamsters..

7... 74... $1 Hair drawer.... 0... 1... 1 Tinsmiths.

1... 6... 7 Hair dresser..

1 Traders....

2... 2 Harness makers.... 0... 11... 11 Washers and ironers 7... 31... 38 Hatter. 0... 1... 1 Weavers...

14...

64... 78 Hostlers...

9... 83... 92 Wheelwrights.... 0... 2... 2 House servants.. 19... 242... 261 Whitewashers. 0... 9... 9 Housewives,. 12... 153... 165 Wool sorters.

4... 4 Jewelers

5... 84... 89 Wool spinner...... 0... 1... 1 Laborers 157...1365...1522 Unknown.

1... 35... 36 Lawyers....

0...

2 Leather japanner... 0... 1...

1 Total.... .377 3459 3836

a es esas

3...

6...

3...

2...

0...

1...

0...

0...

2...

January...
February.
March...
April..
May...
June.
July...

TIME OF COMMITMENT. 1877. Previously. Total.

1877. Previously. Total ... 17.... 219.... 236 August..... 39.... 394.... 433 24...

154... 178 September.. 36.... 375.... 411 26.... 229 255 October...

40.... 334.... 374 35.... 182.... 217 November.

297.... 320 287.... 315 December....

285.... 321 38.... 334.... 372 35.... 369.... 404

Total ...... 377....3459 3836

23

28..

36....

OFFENCES FOR WHICH COMMITTED,

Being common drunkards...

vagrants......
common prostitutes.
railers and brawlers.
sturdy beggars...

common cheats and swindlers.
Neglect to support families..
Larceny.....
House breaking.
Revelling.
Assault...
Night walking..
Obstructing officer....
Maintaining common nuisance.
Intent to commit rape...
Transferred from Providence Reform School..
Wilfully escaping..
Malicious mischief..

Total.....

1877. Previously.
205.... .2212...
84.

625.
42.

217. 2..

51.... 13.

60. 0..

2. 4.

58. 0.

14.. 0.

5. 0.

4. 1...

4.
0.

4.
0..... 1...
0..... 1.
0.

1.
0...

1... 26.

198. 0..

1.

Tota .2417

709 259 53 73

2 62 14 5 4 5 4 1 1 1

1 224

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PLACES FROM WHICH COMMITTED. 1877. Previously. Total.

1877. Previously. Total. Providence......263....2250....2513 Warren.... 5.... 24.... 29 North Providence 0. 271.... 271 East Greenwich.. 2.

10....

12 Pawtucket ...... 17.... 168.... 185 West Greenwich. 0.... 1.... Newport.... 19.... 159.... 178 South Kingstown 3.... 26.... 29 Woonsocket.....

13.... 139. 152 North Kingstown 0... 5.... Johnston, 3.... 68.... 71 Scituate....

0.... 5.... Bristol...

9.
56 Glocester

0.. 2.. 2 East Providence.. 11.... 61.... 72 Tiverton..

0....

2 Cranston... 3.... 48. 51 Exeter..

0.... 2. 2 Lincoln..

4.... 46.... 50 Barrington... 0.... 1... 1 Warwick.. 4.... 27.... 31 Foster....

0.... 1.... 1 Burrillville 10... 31. 41 Richmond.

0....

3. 3 Smithfield... 4.... 24.... 28 Hopkinton... 1....

0....

1 Westerly.

4...

26.... 30 Coventry

2.... 12....

14

Total ...... 377 3459 3836

47....

2...

66

TERMS OF SENTENCE.

1877. Preriously. Three months.....

0...... 2... Six

286. .2578.. Eight

0..... 109. Nine

3... 65.. Ten

1.

50. Eleven

0...

1.: Twelve

532. Fifteen “

1.

3. Sixteen “

0..... 1.. Eighteen months..

5.

17. Two years......

13..

44. Two years, 5 months and six days.

0.

1. Two years and six months....

0...

1.. Three years.......

5

54.. Three years and six months..

0.

1.

Total.

2 2864 109 68 51

1 595

4 1 22 57 1

63.

59 1

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Apples.....

40 bbls. Beef.

5184 lbs. Barley, for fodder...

64 tons. Beans, white.....

414 bush. shell.

6 Beets, sugar..

475 mangel wurtzel... 28} tons. Butter......

7014 lbs. Corn-field, in the ear... 1,000 bush. sweet,

180 green..

..18,484 ears. fodder.

15 tons. Cabbage..

Hay, clover, second crop, 134 tons. Hides...

574 lbs. Melons.

2,500 Milk,

.13,612 gals. Millet...

64 tons. Oats, for fodder.. Onions....

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..10,000 lbs. Carrots..

435 bush. Chickens.

199 lbs. Cucumbers.

25 bush. Eggs...

173 doz.
70 tons.

339 bush. Peas, green..

18 Pigs—sold for $335.50... 47 Potatoes..

2,018 bush. Rye.....

125 Rye straw.

4 tons. Tallow

402 lbs. Turkeys..

1081 Tomatoes..

200 bush. Turnips, round.

1,0871 French..

495 Veal...

609 lbs.

Hay.

Report of the Chaplain of the State Farm.

To the Board of State Charities and Corrections:

GENTLEMEN:—The sphere of work that you have committed to me, embracing the duties of Chaplain to the Workhouse and House of Correction, and to the Almshouse, furnishes abundant opportunity for the exercise of faith and patient endurance, in the endeavor to benefit the inmates.

The confirmed inebriates, the vicious and vagrant classes, in the former insti. tution, and the infirm and diseased occupants of the latter, cannot be regarded as the most hopeful subjects for Christian effort. The direct moral or religious culture of the dangerous or unfortunate classes, must always be attended with serious difficulties. Men that have been gravitating downward from their earliest history, becoming tainted by evil associations, indulging in habits of idleness, intoxication and vice, breaking away from the wholesome restraints of home and friends, and, in many cases, leading the lives of outlaws and criminals, need all the combined influences of legal restraint, of healthful daily toil, of medical supervision, and of moral and religious instruction, to purify the springs of life and change the character.

The chapel services have been maintained with regularity, on Sundays, in the Workhouse. The quiet behavior and good attention manifested on these occasions, would indicate some desire to be benefited. If but a few are saved from the power of habits that have so strongly fortified themselves in their hearts and lives, we should not despair of reaching cases that may now seem hopeless.

Miss Grace Blaisdell has contributed valuable help in performing on the organ, thus aiding in a part of the services in which many of the inmates are well pleased to participate.

Measures, kindred to those used last year, for securing secular instruction in the common branches, have resulted in similar good. A number, who had grown up in ignorance, have acquired the first rudiments of education. The chapel has furnished sufficient accommodation for the various classes, and the officers, together with some of the inmates, have entered into the details of instruction with much interest. About one quarter of those committed here can neither read nor write. It is worthy of consideration, whether it is not due to the wel

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