Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

The table below summarizes the change in rent-to-income ratio for the 789 families involved:

Change in rent-to-income ratio as a result of relocation in private housing

[blocks in formation]

The rental rates and values for dwellings from which families were displaced by Federal-aid highways indicates that many families have low incomes. Data are available on 44,757 of the 46,597 displacements from dwellings caused by Federal-aid highway projects in the period October 23, 1962, through March 31, 1964. These data show that roughly 36 percent were displaced from dwellings that had a value below $6,000 or a rental value of less than $60 per month. An additional 47 percent were displaced from dwellings valued between $6,000 to $15,000, or having a rental rate between $60 to $110 per month. The. remaining 17 percent were displaced from dwellings in excess of $15,000 value or having rental rates in excess of $110. The following table gives a breakdown of these displacements by owner occupants and tenants in unrounded data :

Value of dwelling units occupied by owners and nonowners displaced by Federal

aid highways during the period Oct. 23, 1962, through Mar. 31, 1964

Total

Dwelling units from which displaced

Owners

Nonowners

Number

Percent

7, 813

8, 539

16, 352

36.5

Below $6,000 value or below $60 monthly rental.
Between $6,000 to $15,000 value or $60 to $110 monthly

rental..
Over $15,000 value or over $110 monthly rental.

Total..

13, 886

7,078
2, 194

5, 247

20, 964
7, 441

46.9
16.6

26, 946

17, 811

44,757

100.0

Source: Data provided by the Bureau of Public Roads.

Approximately 82 percent of the displacees in these groups were in urban areas. A breakdown of the value of dwelling units by area is shown below:

Value of dwelling units occupied in rural and urban areas by those displaced by

Federal-aid highways during the period Oct. 23, 1962, through Mar. 31, 1964

[blocks in formation]

A sizable fraction of those displaced from dwellings by Federalaid highways in both urban and rural areas were in the group having low-valued dwellings—a good indication that they also had low incomes. The percentage in this group was greater for rural areas than for urban areas, being approximately 48 percent for rural areas and approximately 34 percent for urban areas. The following table gives a breakdown of the number and percentage of dwelling units by value for urban areas and for rural areas:

Value of dwelling units occupied in rural and urban areas by those displaced

by Federal-aid highways during the period Oct. 23, 1962, through Mar. 31, 1964

Urban areas

Rural areas

Dwelling units from which displaced

Number Percent Number Percent

-

Below $6,000 value or below $60 monthly rental.
Between $6,000 to $15,000 value or $60 to $110 monthly rental.
Over $15,000 value or over $110 monthly rental.

12,489
17, 781

34. 1
48. 5
17.4

3,863 3, 183 1,071 8, 117

47.6 39.2 13.2

Total..

6, 370 36,640

100.0

100.0

Source: Data provided by the Bureau of Public Roads.

Thus, the displacement of low-income families is both an urban and a rural phenomenon, with the greatest number occurring in urban areas.

Approximately one-half of the families or individuals displaced from their dwellings did not receive moving expense payments. This fact is based on an evaluation of data on displacements from dwellings and an evaluation of moving expense payments made to displacees for the same period of time. In order to determine accurately what portion of the displacees were paid, we had to account for the fact that some persons displaced in 1 year might be paid in the following year. Likewise, some of the persons paid in 1 year might have been displaced in the previous year. In many programs, the differences appear to cancel out, i.e., those displaced in the last part of year 1 and paid in the early part of year 2 equal those displaced in the last part of year 2 and paid in the first part of year 3.

To overcome these problems of time lag between displacements and moving cost payments, we asked the agencies making more than a few moving cost payments to indicate whether the displacements and payments they reported would give a representative picture of the proportion of displacees paid for moving costs.

Most agency reports showed that the relationship between displacements and actual moving cost payments reported was representative. In two programs, urban renewal and Federal-aid highways, some modifications were necessary to make the findings representative.

There were 72,920 displacees from dwellings under direct Federal and federally assisted programs per year. Payments for moving costs for the same time period amounted to 29,995. This is roughly 41 percent. Adjustments to make the data more representative would indicate that slightly less than one-half, at the very most, received moving cost payments. The proportions of displacees paid under the programs causing most of the displacements are listed in the table below. Ünrounded data are used.

[blocks in formation]

Total.

72, 923

29, 995

41.1

+ 49.5

1 Data based on a survey of 50 local public authorities by the Urban Renewal Administration to provide representative national picture indicate that 78.4 percent of relocated families and individuals claim relocation payments.

2 Because provision for moving cost payments in the Federal-aid highway program was first authorized in 1962, it is not possible to provide a truly typical or normal percentage of displacees paid. The data here are comprised of actual payments per year (3,450) plus instances in which families still had time to file applications for payment (3,680) also on a per year basis.

: Agencies viewed these as representative and suggested no adjustment.
* An adjusted total of approximately 36,117 would result, giving an adjusted percent of 49.5.

Recently, several States created programs to pay moving costs of those displaced by Federal-aid highways. A total of 22 States had programs for paying moving costs of owners or tenants or both at the time of this writing. The remaining States had no program for paying moving costs of those displaced from dwellings by Federal-aid highways. Because of the recent State enactments, data on moving cost payments of the past do not fully reflect the proportion of displaced persons who would be covered in the future.

A review of State programs and of expected future displacements show that approximately 20,520, or some 56 percent of those to be displaced per year from dwelling units by Federal-aid highways, will not be covered by State programs for paying moving costs. The remaining 16,250, or 44 percent, will be covered. A breakdown of the approximate number and percent of future displacees covered by such moving cost payment programs is given below:

[blocks in formation]

The proportion of both owners and tenants not covered by moving cost payment programs exceeds one-half of the displacees expected under Federal-aid highway projects. Approximately 54 percent of the owners to be displaced from dwellings are not covered by moving cost payment programs. The proportion of tenants is slightly higher, being 58 percent.

For all programs, approximately 21,684 families or individuals to be displaced from dwellings per year will not be covered under moving cost payment programs. Most of these will be displacees in Federalaid highway projects. A sizeable number also will be displacees in various other direct Federal and federally assisted programs. More specific information on the agencies not having a moving cost payment program is given in chapter IX and in appendix F. A general breakdown is given here of expected displacements per year not covered by moving cost payment programs. Total displacements by agencies are expressed in unrounded data.

[blocks in formation]

Displacements for businesses under all programs totaled 10,900 per year. Nearly all of these, some 10,620, occurred under federally assisted programs. Direct Federal programs accounted for approximately 280

displaced businesses per year.

[blocks in formation]

Urban renewal and Federal-aid highway programs accounted for 95 percent of the displacements. Together these two programs accounted for 10,379 of the 10,900 businesses displaced. If we add displacements for low-rent housing, we account for 97 percent of the business displacements. Agencies causing more than a few displacements are listed below with the magnitude of their displacement. Unrounded data are used for the individual agencies.

[blocks in formation]

Displacement of businesses occurred in most programs. Therefore, programs other than for urban renewal and Federal-aid highways cannot be ignored in any modification of procedures or laws relating to business displacement.

« AnteriorContinuar »