Grammatical Synthesis: The Art of English Composition

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C. Scribner, 1870 - 356 páginas
 

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Página 352 - At thirty man suspects himself a fool ; Knows it at forty, and reforms his plan; At fifty chides his infamous delay, Pushes his prudent purpose to resolve; In all the magnanimity of thought Resolves, and re-resolves; then dies the same.
Página 139 - Out of whose womb came the ice? and the hoary frost of heaven, who hath gendered it?
Página 195 - Almighty's form Glasses itself in tempests: in all time, Calm or convulsed — in breeze, or gale, or storm. Icing the pole, or in the torrid clime Dark-heaving; — boundless, endless, and sublime; The image of eternity, the throne Of the Invisible: even from out thy slime The monsters of the deep are made; each zone Obeys thee; thou goest forth, dread, fathomless, alone.
Página 60 - Let all the ends thou aim'st at be thy country's, Thy God's, and truth's; then if thou fall'st, O Cromwell, Thou fall'st a blessed martyr!
Página 198 - Natura fieret laudabile carmen, an arte, Quaesitum est : ego nee studium sine divite vena, Nee rude quid possit video ingenium ; alterius sic 410 Altera poscit opem res et conjurat amice.
Página 2 - When I came to my castle, for so I think I called it ever after this, I fled into it like one pursued.
Página 351 - T is not in folly not to scorn a fool, And scarce in human wisdom to do more. All promise is poor dilatory man, And that through every stage. WHen young, indeed, In full content, we sometimes nobly rest Un-anxious for ourselves; and only wish, As duteous sons, our fathers were more wise.
Página 310 - Crafty men contemn studies, simple men admire them, and wise men use them ; for they teach not their own use ; but that is a wisdom •without them, and above them, won by observation. Read not to contradict and confute, nor to believe and take for granted, nor to find talk and discourse, but to weigh and consider. Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested...
Página 324 - I have not loved the world, nor the world me ; I have not flattered its rank breath, nor bowed To its idolatries a patient knee, Nor coined my cheek to smiles, nor cried aloud In worship of an echo; in the crowd They could not deem me one of such: I stood Among them, but not of them...
Página 221 - Puritans were men whose minds had derived a peculiar character from the daily contemplation of superior beings and eternal interests. Not content with acknowledging, in general terms, an overruling Providence, they habitually ascribed every event to the will of the Great Being, for whose power nothing was too vast, for whose inspection nothing was too minute.

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