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Unwillingly to school: And then, the lover;
Sighing like furnace, with a woful ballad
Made to his mistress' eye-brow. Then, a soldier;
Full of strange oaths, and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honour 1) and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon's mouth: And then, the justice;
In fair round belly, with good capon lined,
With eyes severe, and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws and modern 3) instances,
And so he plays his part: The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slipper'd pantaloon;
With spectacles on nose, and pouch on side;
His youthful hose well saved, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound: Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness, and mere oblivion;
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans every thing.

(As you like it. Act II.)

On Study.

Study is like the heaven's glorious sun,

That will not be deep-search'd with saucy looks;
Small have continual plodders ever won,

Save base authority from other's books.
These earthly godfathers of heaven's lights,

That give a name to every fixed star,
Have no more profit of their shining nights

Than those that walk, and wot not what they are.
Too much to know, is to know nought but fame;
And every godfather can give a name.

(Love's Labour's Lost. Act 1.)

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The Mind alone valuable.

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For 'tis the mind that makes the body rich;
And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds,
So honour peereth ) in the meanest habit,
What! is the jay more precious than the lark,
Because his feathers are more beautiful ?
Or is the adder better than the eel,
Because his painted skin contents the eye?
O, no, good Kate; neither art thou the worse
For this poor furniture and mean array.

(Taming of the Shrew. Act IV.)

Vanity of Human Nature.
These our actors,
As I foretold you, were all spirits, and
Are melted into air, into thin air:

And, like the baseless fabric of this vision, 1) Violent. 2) Trite, common. 3) Appeareth.

The cloud - capp'd towers, the gorgeous palaces,
The solemn temples, the great globe itself,
Yea, all which it inherit shall dissolve;
And, like this insubstantial pageant faded ),
Leave not a rack 2) behind. We are such stuff
As dreams are made of, and our little life
Is rounded with sleep.

(Tempest. Act IV.)

Music.

If music be the food of love, play on,
Give me excess of it; that surfeiting,
The appetite may sicken, and so die.
That strain again; it had a dying fall:
0, it came o'er my ear like the sweet south,
That breathes upon a bank of violets,
Stealing, and giving odour.

(Twelfth Night. Act I.)

Perfection admits of no Addition.

To gild refined gold, to paint the lily,
To throw a perfume on the violet,
To smooth the ice, or add another hue
Unto the rainbow, or with taper - light
To seek the beauteous eye of heaven to garnish ?),
Is wasteful, and ridiculous excess.

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In this the antique and well- noted face
Of plain old form is much disfigured:
And, like a shifted wind unto a sail,
It makes the course of thoughts to fetch about:
Startles and frights consideration;
Makes sound opinion sick, and truth suspected,
For putting on so new a fashion'd robe.

(King John. Act IV.)

Sun-rising after a dark Night.
Know'st thou not,
That when the searching eye of heaven is hid
Behind the globe, and lights the lower world,
Then thieves and robbers range about unseen,
In murders, and in outrage, bloody here;
But when from under this terrestrial ball,
He fires the proud tops of the eastern pines,
And darts his light through every guilty hole,
Then murders, treasons, and detested sins,
The cloak of night being pluck'd from off their backs,
Stand bare and naked, trembling at themselves ?

1) Vanished. 2) A body of clouds in motion; but it is most probable that the author wrote track. 3) Decorate.

Vanity of Power.
No matter where; of comfort no man speak:
Let's talk of graves, of worms, and epitaphs;
Make dust our paper, and with rainy eyes
Write sorrow on the bosom of the earth.
Let's choose executors, and talk of wills :
And yet not so,

for what can we bequeath,
Save our deposed bodies to the ground?
Our lands, our lives, and all are Bolingbrokes,
And nothing can we call our own but death,
And that small model of the barren earth
Which serves as paste and cover to our bones,
For heaven's sake, let us sit upon the ground
And tell sad stories of the death of kings:
How some have been deposed, some slain in war;
Some haunted by the ghosts they have deposed;
Some poison'd by their wives, some sleeping kill'd;
All murder'd : For within the hollow crown
That rounds the mortal temples of a king
Keeps Death his court: and there the antic sits,
Scoffing his state, and grinning at his pomp;
Allowing him a breath, a little scene,
To monarchize, be fear'd, and kill with looks;
Infusing him with self and vain conceit,
As if this flesh, which walls about our life,
Were brass impregnable; and, humour'd thus,
Comes at the last, and with a little pin
Bores through his castle wall, and farewell king!
Cover your heads, and mock not flesh and blood
With solemn reverence; throw away respect,
Tradition, form, and ceremonious duty,
For you have but mistook me all this while:
I live with bread like you, feel want, taste grief,
Need friends : subjected thus,
How can you say to me - I am a king?

( King Richard II. Act III.)
Hotspur's Impatience for the Battle.
Let them come;
They come like sacrifices in their trim,
And to the fire-eyed maid of smoky war,
All hot and bleeding, will we offer them:
The mailed Mars shall on his altar sit,
Up to the ears in blood. I am on fire,
To hear this rich reprisal is so nigh,
And yet not ours: Come, let me take my horse ,
Who is to bear me, like a thunderbolt,
Against the bosom of the prince of Wales :
Harry to Harry shall, hot horse to horse,
Meet, and ne'er part, till one drop down a corse.
0, that Glendower were come!

(First Part of King Henry IV. Act 1V.)

Apostrophe to Sleep.
Sleep, gentle sleep,
Nature's soft nurse, how have I frighted thee,

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That thou no more wilt weigh my eyelids down,
And steep my senses in forgetfulness?
Why rather, sleep, liest thou in smoky cribs,
Upon uneasy pallets stretching thee,
And hush'd with buzzing night-flies to thy slumber;
Than in the perfumed chambers of the great,
Under the canopies of costly state,
And lulld with sounds •of sweetest melody?
O thou dull god, why liest thou with the vile
In loathsome beds; and leavest the kingly couch,
A watch - case, or a common 'larum bell?
Wilt thou upon the high and giddy mast
Seal up the ship - boy's eyes, and rock his brains
In cradle of the rude imperious surge;
And in the visitation of the winds,
Who take the ruffian billows by the top,
Curling their monstrous heads, and hanging them
With deafening clamours in the slippery clouds,
That, with the hurly '), death itself awakes ?
Canst thou, '0 partial sleep! give thy repose
To the wet sea - boy, in an hour so rude;
And, in the calmest and most stillest night,
With all appliances and means to boot,
Deny it to a king?

(Second Part of King. Ilenry IV.

Act III.)

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The Commonwealth of Bees.
So work the honey bees;
Creatures, that, by a rule in nature, teach
The art of order to a peopled kingdom.
They have a king, and officers of sorts 2):
Where some, like magistrates, correct at home;
Others, like merchants, venture trade abroad;
Others, like soldiers, armed in their stings,
Make boot upon the summer's velvet buds;
Which pillage they with merry march bring home
To the tent-royal of their emperor;
Who, busied in his Majesty, surveys
The singing masons building roofs of gold;
The civil 3) citizens, kneading up the honey;
The poor me anic porters cr ng in
Their heavy burdens at this narrow gate;
The sad-eyed justice, with his surly hum,
Delivering o'er to executors 4) pale
The lazy yawning drone.

( King Henry V. , Act I.)

Night.
The gaudy, blabbing, and remorseful") day
Is crept into the bosom of the sea;
And now loud - howling wolves arouse the jades

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That drag the tragic melancholy night;
Who with their drowsy, slow, and flagging wings
Clip dead men's graves, and from their misty jaws
Breathe foul contagious darkness in the air.

(Second Part of King Henry VI. Act IV.).

tell me.

7

Clarence's Dream.
What was your dream, my lord? I pray you ,
Clar. Methought that I had broken from the Tower,

And was embark'd to cross to Burgundy:
And, in my company, my brother Gloster;
Who from my cabin tempted me to walk
Upon the hatches; thence we look'd toward England,
And cited up a thousand heavy times,
During the wars of York and Lancaster,
That had befallen us. As we paced along
Upon the giddy footing of the hatches,
Methought that Gloster stumbled; and, in falling,
Struck me, that thought to stay him, overboard,
Into the tumbling billows of the main.
O Lord! methought, what pain it was to drown!
What dreadful noise of water in mine ears!
What sights of ugly death within mine eyes!
Methought I saw a thousand fearful wrecks;
A thousand men, that fishes gnaw'd upon;
Wedges of gold, great anchors, heaps of pearl,
Unestimable stones, unvalued jewels,
All scatter'd in the bottom of the sea.
Some lay in dead men's skulls; and, in those holes
Where eyes did once inhabit, there were crept
(As 'twere in scorn of eyes) reflecting gems,
That woo'd the slimy bottom of the deep,
And mock'd the dead bones that lay scatter'd by.

(King Richard III. Act I.)

Description of Cleopatra sailing down the Cydnus.

The barge she sat in, like a burnish'd throne,
Burn'd on the water: the poop was beaten gold;
Purple the sails, and so perfumed, that
The winds were love-sick with them: the oars were silver;
Which to the tune of flutes kept stroke, and made
The water which they beat to follow faster,
As amorous of their strokes. For her own person,
It beggar'd all description: she did lie
In her pavillon, (cloth of gold, of tissue,)
O’er - picturing that Venus, where we see,
The fancy out-work nature: on each side her,
Stood pretty dimpled boys, like smiling Cupids,
With diverse - colour'd fans, whose wind did seem
To glow the delicate cheeks which they did cool,
And what they undid, did *).

0, rare for Antony!

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Agr.

1) Added to the warmth they were intended to diminish.

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