The Art of Color: The Subjective Experience and Objective Rationale of Color

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Wiley, Jan 15, 1974 - 160 pages
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In this book, the world's foremost color theorist examines two different approaches to understanding the art of color. Subjective feelings and objective color principles are described in detail and clarified by color reproductions.

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Yeah, what the world would be without color, I wouldn't argue on that. Personal apparel and color is like presenting oneself toward the world accordingly. Itten's “subjective colors” discovery is still an unsurpassed novelty. More than two decades back I wrote a booklet or brochure about how personal apparel services can use it and, even before that, literature on the subject became visible in the market. One author applied the principles even for interior design, color-wise, especially. However, company buyers, at the fairs, shop cloth very much influenced by their own color dogma. Their customers then buy what has been provided under such foreshadowing. And the industry does all to avoid producing the colors of the season so one could use them as Itten would make it possible. The same racket reigns here as in any field in which quality is the enemy to some degree. So, one can not buy the fabrics and tailor, because the colors are mainly off “subjective colors” in that they are avoided in intricate ways. “We do not know to do such...” can be earned investigating. Even painters have probed into the possibilities and given up. The knowledge can be exploited perhaps in future, more enlightened, civilizations. Still – great to know and understand. Frank Steineck visual artist. 

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mumet >,<"

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